International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: The inside story of how the Offshore Leaks Database became a go-to resource on offshore finance

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: The inside story of how the Offshore Leaks Database became a go-to resource on offshore finance. “After steadily expanding the database since 2013 with information from 2016’s Panama Papers project and four other leaks, ICIJ today releases the last batch of data, which includes new data on more than 9,000 offshore companies, foundations and trusts, from the Pandora Papers, the massive leak from 14 so-called offshore service providers that powered last year’s largest-ever journalism collaboration of the same name. As we close the final chapter of the Pandora Papers in the Offshore Leaks Database, we share what it took to bring it to life — and why it has become an essential tool in the global fight to dismantle offshore secrecy.

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: ICIJ releases new Pandora Papers data from two offshore service providers

International Consortium of Investigative Journalists: ICIJ releases new Pandora Papers data from two offshore service providers. “With the addition of more than 15,000 companies, foundations and trusts, ICIJ’s Offshore Leaks database now has information on more than 800,000 entities registered in secrecy jurisdictions coming from five different investigations.”

Financial Post: Google’s ‘Dutch Sandwich’ manoeuvre shielded $19.2 billion from taxes in 2016

Financial Post: Google’s ‘Dutch Sandwich’ manoeuvre shielded $19.2 billion from taxes in 2016. “Alphabet Inc.’s Google moved 15.9 billion euros (US$19.2 billion) to a Bermuda shell company in 2016, saving at least US$3.7 billion in taxes that year, regulatory filings in the Netherlands show. Google uses two structures, known as a ‘Double Irish’ and a ‘Dutch Sandwich,’ to shield the majority of its international profits from taxation. The setup involves shifting revenue from one Irish subsidiary to a Dutch company with no employees, and then on to a Bermuda mailbox owned by another Ireland-registered company.”

Business Insider: How a nerdy Swedish database startup with $80m in funding cracked the Paradise Papers

Business Insider: How a nerdy Swedish database startup with $80m in funding cracked the Paradise Papers. “Emil Eifrem was driving home from his goddaughter’s fifth birthday party in Gothenburg, Sweden, when his phone started buzzing. A stream of notifications alerted him to the Paradise Papers, a massive leak which showed how the world’s richest people use offshore havens to shield their wealth. ‘I switched seats with my wife,’ he said. ‘We turned on the radio, and as I’m sitting in the car I’m pulling up my laptop, trying to hotspot. I knew what my Monday would be like.’ Over the next 24 hours, Eifrem knew he’d be fielding a bunch of interview requests about the leaks.”