Column: New data tool shows disparities in arts education across Oklahoma (Tulsa World)

Tulsa World: Column: New data tool shows disparities in arts education across Oklahoma. “Data available through the Oklahoma Arts Education Dashboard, a new tool created by Quadrant Arts Education Research, shows 45% of students in Oklahoma have no access to arts education in their school…. These figures and more are available through the dashboard, recently developed through a partnership of the Oklahoma Arts Council, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahomans for the Arts, and Kirkpatrick Foundation.”

KOCO: Federal grant funds COVID-19 vaccine program for homebound Oklahomans

KOCO: Federal grant funds COVID-19 vaccine program for homebound Oklahomans. “The vaccine is being issued to the most vulnerable and unable to get the shot on their own. The partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Human Services, the State Department of Health and Native American tribes in our state is helping with vaccine access. Until August, homebound individuals had no pathway to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Now, the most compromised can get vaccinated from the safety of their home.”

The Oklahoman: Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt says he has no plans to get COVID-19 booster shot

The Oklahoman: Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt says he has no plans to get COVID-19 booster shot. “Despite state health officials recommending all eligible Oklahomans get a COVID-19 booster shot, Gov. Kevin Stitt says he doesn’t plan on getting another inoculation. Stitt said Monday he hasn’t received a booster shot nor does he plan on getting another jab. ‘I’m perfectly healthy, and my doctor hasn’t told me I need to get it,’ said Stitt, who was the first governor to contract COVID-19. Stitt said he experienced mild symptoms when he had the virus last summer.”

ArmyTimes: Oklahoma Guard goes rogue, rejects COVID vaccine mandate after sudden change of command

ArmyTimes: Oklahoma Guard goes rogue, rejects COVID vaccine mandate after sudden change of command. “The new commander of the Oklahoma National Guard has declared the organization will not enforce the Defense Department’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate on its troops, according to local media outlets. Army Brig. Gen. Thomas Mancino was announced as the state’s new adjutant general Wednesday, though he has not yet been confirmed by the state Senate, according to a press release from Gov. Kevin Stitt’s office.”

KFOR: Patients overdosing on ivermectin backing up rural Oklahoma hospitals, ambulances

KFOR: Patients overdosing on ivermectin backing up rural Oklahoma hospitals, ambulances. “Dr. [Jason] McElyea said patients are packing his eastern and southeastern Oklahoma hospitals after taking ivermectin doses meant for a full-sized horse, because they believed false claims the horse de-wormer could fight COVID-19. ‘The ERs are so backed up that gunshot victims were having hard times getting to facilities where they can get definitive care and be treated,’ he said.”

News on 6: Local Nonprofit Launches New Statewide Early Childhood Job Board

News on 6: Local Nonprofit Launches New Statewide Early Childhood Job Board. “A Tulsa nonprofit has launched a new online job board designed to help childcare facilities across the state find qualified workers. The new database allows job seekers to find an opportunity and childcare facilities to find the right candidates…. The database is free for employers to post open positions and for people looking for a job in childcare.”

NonDoc: Newly digitized OU Daily archives offer a window into university’s identity

NonDoc: Newly digitized OU Daily archives offer a window into university’s identity . “The University of Oklahoma’s student newspaper, long called The Oklahoma Daily and now simply The OU Daily, put out its first issue in 1897, making it one of the oldest publications in the state. Since its founding, the publication has chronicled the university’s greatest triumphs, its lighter moments and its most turbulent chapters. Now, that history is being fully archived and made available online through the Carl Albert Center’s Gateway to Oklahoma History portal.”

CNBC: Black Wall Street was shattered 100 years ago. How the Tulsa race massacre was covered up and unearthed

CNBC: Black Wall Street was shattered 100 years ago. How the Tulsa race massacre was covered up and unearthed. “At the turn of the 20th century, the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma, became one of the first communities in the country thriving with Black entrepreneurial businesses….On May 31, 1921, a white mob turned Greenwood upside down in one of the worst racial massacres in U.S. history. In the matter of hours, 35 square blocks of the vibrant Black community were turned into smoldering ashes. Countless Black people were killed — estimates ranged from 55 to more than 300 — and 1,000 homes and businesses were looted and set on fire.”

OKC Fox: Supply chain database created to help Oklahoma manufacturers

OKC Fox: Supply chain database created to help Oklahoma manufacturers. “Governor Kevin Stitt is looking to help Oklahoma manufacturers find resources during critical times. The first part of ‘Supply Chain Oklahoma’ is an online database called ‘Connex Oklahoma.’ The database will allow manufactures to connect with alternate suppliers, explore production capabilities and view their supply chains visually.”

KFOR: Library of Congress agrees to change subject heading from ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ to ‘Tulsa Race Massacre’

KFOR: Library of Congress agrees to change subject heading from ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ to ‘Tulsa Race Massacre’. “A task force at the University of Oklahoma has spearheaded an effort to change how the Library of Congress catalogs the Tulsa Race Massacre. Officials say Library of Congress Subject Headings are extremely important and are often used to find important resources on topics when searching online library catalogs. Following a proposal by a task force at the University of Oklahoma Libraries, the Library of Congress agreed that the term ‘Tulsa Race Riot’ was not completely accurate.”