From cut-out confessions to cheese pages: browse the world’s strangest books (The Guardian)

The Guardian: From cut-out confessions to cheese pages: browse the world’s strangest books. “Edward Brooke-Hitching grew up in a rare book shop, with a rare book dealer for a father. As the author of histories of maps The Phantom Atlas, The Golden Atlas and The Sky Atlas, he has always been ‘really fascinated by books that are down the back alleys of history’. Ten years ago, he embarked on a project to come up with the ‘ultimate library’. No first editions of Jane Austen here, though: Brooke-Hitching’s The Madman’s Library collects the most eccentric and extraordinary books from around the world.”

Antiques Trade Gazette: ILAB president announces launch of missing books database following re-election

Antiques Trade Gazette: ILAB president announces launch of missing books database following re-election. “Australian book dealer Sally Burdon said she will use her second term as [International League of Antiquarian Booksellers] president to consolidate changes and launch a new missing books register following the international book trade association’s recent election.”

Fine Books & Collections: Discover the UK’s Historic Books

From a month ago and I just found it. Fine Books & Collections: Discover the UK’s Historic Books . “Discover Historic Books was put together during UK lockdown this year by the team behind the Unlocking The Archive project, a collaboration between the University of East Anglia (UEA), the National Trust’s Blickling Estate property, and Norfolk Library and Information Service. Visitors to the website can explore ancient books such as Daniel Heinsius’ 1629 In Praise of the Ass (Laus asini) and A History of Lapland by John Scheffer (1674) using interactive hotpoints to explain the text and all the nuts and bolts of the physical books, from Renaissance typefaces to yapp edges and printers’ marks.”

New Online: A Digital Treasure Trove of Rare Books (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: New Online: A Digital Treasure Trove of Rare Books. “There is a mystique surrounding libraries with old, rare books, and the Library of Congress is no exception. Just think of all the dark and vast vaults of the Rare Book and Special Collections Division that are closed to the public and imagine what undiscovered treasures they hold. Now, thanks to the digital age, the stacks are open and searchable—everyone can access these untold treasures through our newly released web portal.”