CNET: Turn Grandma’s memories into a podcast with the Saga app

CNET: Turn Grandma’s memories into a podcast with the Saga app. “The new Saga audio app is a way for families to record and save the life stories of loved ones. The app, released generally Tuesday, sends weekly prompts to the people you choose, asking a question like ‘How did you meet grandpa?’ or ‘What was your journey to America like?’ From there, the family member records answers by dialing a special phone number. The stories are automatically shared with you and your family on the app, regardless of location. The best part? No smartphone needed.”

Edinburgh News: Glasgow woman, 94, rescued after not eating for five days during lockdown because she was ‘too scared’ to leave flat

Edinburgh News: Glasgow woman, 94, rescued after not eating for five days during lockdown because she was ‘too scared’ to leave flat. “The Glasgow woman, who lived on the top floor of a tenement block, was discovered on March 23rd by a mobile food support project of the Salvation Army, a Christian Church and charity, and by Govan housing association. Tracy Bearcroft, a major in the Govan Salvation Army, told the Guardian she had ‘no one to get anything for her’ and was ‘too frightened to go out,’ adding: ‘At first it was very scary for a lot of old folk, who didn’t want to go out because they thought they would catch (Covid-19) immediately and have to go to hospital.'”

USA Today: 103-year-old Massachusetts woman beats coronavirus, celebrates with Bud Light

USA Today: 103-year-old Massachusetts woman beats coronavirus, celebrates with Bud Light. “Shelley Gunn describes her Polish grandmother, Jennie Stejna, as having a feisty spirit. Stejna certainly displayed that spirit as the 103-year-old woman recently survived a bout with the coronavirus.”

Associated Press: White House goal on testing nursing homes unmet

Associated Press: White House goal on testing nursing homes unmet. “Nearly two weeks ago the White House urged governors to ensure that every nursing home resident and staff member be tested for the coronavirus within 14 days. It’s not going to happen. A review by The Associated Press found that at least half of the states are not going to meet White House’s deadline and some aren’t even bothering to try.”

New York Times: They Survived the Worst Battles of World War II. And Died of the Virus.

New York Times: They Survived the Worst Battles of World War II. And Died of the Virus.. “The question of what went wrong at the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home will be with Massachusetts for a long time. With scarce protective gear and a shortage of staff, the facility’s administrators combined wards of infected and uninfected men, and the virus spread quickly through a fragile population. Of the 210 veterans who were living in the facility in late March, 89 are now dead, 74 having tested positive for the virus. Almost three-quarters of the veterans inside were infected. It is one of the highest death tolls of any end-of-life facility in the country.”

Coronavirus investigation: DeSantis’ ‘whack-a-mole’ approach fails the frail in nursing homes (Palm Beach Post)

Palm Beach Post: Coronavirus investigation: DeSantis’ ‘whack-a-mole’ approach fails the frail in nursing homes. “COVID-19 fatalities linked to elder care centers comprise nearly half of the deaths in Florida and the percentage rises every day. Yet nursing homes and ALF residents and staff comprise only 2 percent of the state’s population. Between April and May, the death toll at nursing homes and ALFs increased nearly 600 percent. By Thursday, COVID-19 deaths of residents and staff had topped 1,000. Mary Mayhew, secretary for the Agency for Health Care Administration, said way back on March 16 that ‘timely testing for our elderly and medically frail is mission critical.’ But it took a month after the first Florida cases bubbled up on March 1 before the administration even tried to get a grip on outbreaks by ordering elder-care homes to report their COVID cases to the state.”

AP count: Over 4,500 virus patients sent to NY nursing homes (AP)

AP: AP count: Over 4,500 virus patients sent to NY nursing homes. “More than 4,500 recovering coronavirus patients were sent to New York’s already vulnerable nursing homes under a controversial state directive that was ultimately scrapped amid criticisms it was accelerating the nation’s deadliest outbreaks, according to a count by The Associated Press. AP compiled its own tally to find out how many COVID-19 patients were discharged from hospitals to nursing homes under the March 25 directive after New York’s Health Department declined to release its internal survey conducted two weeks ago. It says it is still verifying data that was incomplete.”