Washington Post: An Olympic gold medalist said she was ‘brave’ for not wearing a mask. It was not well-received.

Washington Post: An Olympic gold medalist said she was ‘brave’ for not wearing a mask. It was not well-received.. “Olympic gold medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings apologized Monday for leaving some people ‘upset’ by an Instagram post in which she described going shopping without a face mask, saying she was advocating for individual freedom amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.”

Tokyo Olympics: Coronavirus risk raises questions over 2021 Games (BBC)

BBC: Tokyo Olympics: Coronavirus risk raises questions over 2021 Games. “For some athletes, today was the last chance to take part in the Tokyo Olympics. They are too old, too exhausted or too financially stretched to wait for another year, after the pandemic forced its postponement. One of them is 35-year-old Tetsuya Sotomura. When I met him on a sweltering afternoon earlier this week he was still hard at it in a converted factory building in a north Tokyo suburb, flying high into the air, spinning and tumbling on a massive trampoline.”

New York Times: Take Coronavirus More Seriously, Say Olympic Rowers Who Got It

New York Times: Take Coronavirus More Seriously, Say Olympic Rowers Who Got It. “Emily Regan, an Olympic gold medalist from Williamsville, N.Y., who was among those infected, wrote a post on Facebook this month highlighting how debilitating the disease could be, even for some of the world’s best athletes who have incredibly powerful and efficient lungs…. ‘The narrative that has been going around in some places is that you won’t get the virus if you’re young and strong, or if you get it, it won’t be bad, but we’re perfect examples of how that is totally not true,’ Regan said. She added: ‘Look what the virus still did to us. It knocked us down pretty hard.'”

Washington Post: World’s fastest blind athlete and his running partner try to stay in sync as they remain apart

Washington Post: World’s fastest blind athlete and his running partner try to stay in sync as they remain apart. “The relationship between David Brown and Jerome Avery is as unique as they come in the sports world. Avery has been by Brown’s side for all of his most successful moments. They have been literally tethered together as they have sprinted down the track, legs pumping and arms swinging in perfect rhythm. Brown, 27, is the fastest blind sprinter on the planet and the first to run 100 meters in under 11 seconds. Avery, 41, serves as his eyes on the track. As Brown’s running guide, Avery sprints right next to him in training and competitions, escorting him from the starting blocks to the finish line…. Over the past four years, the two have been preparing for the Tokyo Paralympics, but their training has been upended by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Social distancing guidelines recommend they remain at least six feet apart, which is difficult when the string that connects them on the track is less than a foot long.”

NBC Sports: Olympic champion short track speed skater banned 1 year for social media post

NBC Sports: Olympic champion short track speed skater banned 1 year for social media post. “Csaba Burjan, an Olympic short track speed skating relay gold medalist for Hungary, has been banned one year for a social media post. In early December, an Instagram photo on Burjan’s account showed a line of people at a Chinese airport with an expletive, according to Hungarian and Chinese reports.”