National Cancer Institute: BRCA Exchange aggregates data on thousands of BRCA variants to inform understanding of cancer risk

National Cancer Institute: BRCA Exchange aggregates data on thousands of BRCA variants to inform understanding of cancer risk. “A global resource that includes data on thousands of inherited variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is available to the public. The BRCA Exchange was created through the BRCA Challenge, a long-term demonstration project initiated by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) to enhance sharing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 data. The resource, available through a website and a new smartphone appExit Disclaimer, allows clinicians to review expert classifications of variants in these major cancer predisposition genes as part of their individual assessment of complex questions related to cancer prevention, screening, and intervention for high-risk patients.”

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Searchable Database Provides AHRQ-Funded Articles

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Searchable Database Provides AHRQ-Funded Articles. “More than 4,600 recently published articles on nurse-patient partnerships, compliance with infection control practices in home health care, and racial/ethnic differences in end-of-life cancer than 4,600 Agency-supported articles are now available in the AHRQ Research Studies database.”

Cancer. gov: Researchers create record-sized, integrated cellular cancer database

Cancer .gov: Researchers create record-sized, integrated cellular cancer database. “An international team of researchers have created a powerful new database that consolidates data on a record number of cancer drugs and cell lines. The freely available tool, called CellMinerCDB, can be used to explore connections between drugs and various features of cancer, such as genetic mutations, cell signatures, DNA methylation and more.”

Science Daily: Skin cancer rates in England far higher than previously thought, according to new database

Science Daily: Skin cancer rates in England far higher than previously thought, according to new database . “Data from the newly established UK skin cancer database, the largest database of its kind in the world, has revealed that there are over 45,000 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) every year in England, 350 per cent more than previous estimates suggested. Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer.”

Georgia Tech: Open Source Machine Learning Tool Could Help Choose Cancer Drugs

Georgia Tech: Open Source Machine Learning Tool Could Help Choose Cancer Drugs. “The selection of a first-line chemotherapy drug to treat many types of cancer is often a clear-cut decision governed by standard-of-care protocols, but what drug should be used next if the first one fails? That’s where Georgia Institute of Technology researchers believe their new open source decision support tool could come in. Using machine learning to analyze RNA expression tied to information about patient outcomes with specific drugs, the open source tool could help clinicians chose the chemotherapy drug most likely to attack the disease in individual patients.”

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals. “One of the world’s top breast cancer doctors failed to disclose millions of dollars in payments from drug and health care companies in recent years, omitting his financial ties from dozens of research articles in prestigious publications like The New England Journal of Medicine and The Lancet.”

STAT News: IBM’s Watson supercomputer recommended ‘unsafe and incorrect’ cancer treatments, internal documents show

STAT News: IBM’s Watson supercomputer recommended ‘unsafe and incorrect’ cancer treatments, internal documents show. This article is paywalled. “Internal IBM documents show that its Watson supercomputer often spit out erroneous cancer treatment advice and that company medical specialists and customers identified ‘multiple examples of unsafe and incorrect treatment recommendations’ as IBM was promoting the product to hospitals and physicians around the world.”