Medical University of South Carolina: AI tool studied as way to provide cancer risk assessment in low-resource communities

Medical University of South Carolina: AI tool studied as way to provide cancer risk assessment in low-resource communities. “Originally designed as a type of social network provided through an app, ItRunsInMyFamily has evolved into a simple informatics tool that uses artificial intelligence and social networking to collect family health history from patients. Participants complete a short 10-minute questionnaire easily accessible through a website. The free survey, which was built by cancer and informatics experts, using the most current health care guidelines and models, helps individuals do a comprehensive hereditary risk assessment.”

EurekAlert: New open-source software judges accuracy of computer predictions of cancer genetics

EurekAlert: New open-source software judges accuracy of computer predictions of cancer genetics. “Because simple clinical methods to test for genetic variation are vulnerable to missing a lot of cell-to-cell variability, recent computer tools have been developed to predict and characterise genetic diversity within clinical tumour samples. However, there is no existing common benchmarking approach to determine the most accurate computational methods. The study, published in Nature Biotechnology, developed open-source software that can be used to judge the accuracy of computer predictions and establish this benchmark.”

Weill Cornell Medicine: Scientists Build the First Global Database and Roadmap for CAR Therapy Clinical Trials

Weill Cornell Medicine: Scientists Build the First Global Database and Roadmap for CAR Therapy Clinical Trials. “Weill Cornell Medicine scientists have built the first global database of clinical trials testing a rapidly expanding approach to cancer treatment that involves genetically modifying immune cells to recognize specific targets on a patient’s cancer cells and attack them. By analyzing the approach, called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapies, the scientists designed a ‘therapeutic roadmap’ that identifies all current therapies as well as additional cancers that can be treated with them.”

Research Brief: Discovering how people with breast cancer use Facebook for support (University of Minnesota)

University of Minnesota: Research Brief: Discovering how people with breast cancer use Facebook for support. “Many people turn to social networks, such as Facebook, to connect with friends and family during times of crisis. A study by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health recently analyzed the activity of breast cancer survivors on Facebook during their treatment and found while they posted more, they made relatively few requests for help.”

New York University: Combination of Artificial Intelligence & Radiologists More Accurately Identified Breast Cancer

New York University: Combination of Artificial Intelligence & Radiologists More Accurately Identified Breast Cancer. “An artificial intelligence (AI) tool—trained on roughly a million screening mammography images—has identified breast cancer with approximately 90 percent accuracy when combined with analysis by radiologists.”

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: $3.7 million supports crowdsourced database of cancer genomics

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis: $3.7 million supports crowdsourced database of cancer genomics. “The database’s name is CIViC, which stands for Clinical Interpretations of Variants in Cancer. According to its founders, it is the only entirely open-source online resource for querying tumor mutations — like a Wikipedia for cancer genomics. Comparing CIViC to Wikipedia — an online encyclopedia maintained by volunteers — the Griffiths, who are twin brothers, designed a system that allows anyone to create an account and contribute information to the database. Experts in the field serve as editors, curating data that is incorporated into the system. It is also free for anyone to use.”

University of Arkansas: Study Co-authored by UAMS Doctor Shows Benefit of Facebook Patient Support Groups in Rare Cancer Research

University of Arkansas: Study Co-authored by UAMS Doctor Shows Benefit of Facebook Patient Support Groups in Rare Cancer Research. “An article co-authored by Jerad Gardner, M.D., at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) demonstrates the ability to use international Facebook patient support groups to rapidly reach large numbers of rare cancer survivors.”