The Verge: YouTube will reportedly halt targeted ads for videos that appeal to kids

The Verge: YouTube will reportedly halt targeted ads for videos that appeal to kids. “YouTube is ‘finalizing plans’ to end targeted advertising on its main site for uploaded videos that children are likely to watch, according to a new report from Bloomberg. The move could be meant to appease regulators at the Federal Trade Commission who have examined whether YouTube has violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) through data collection and a failure to protect young users on the platform.”

New York Times: Facebook’s New Tool Lets You See Which Apps and Websites Tracked You

New York Times: Facebook’s New Tool Lets You See Which Apps and Websites Tracked You. “The company introduced a new tool that lets people better see and control the information that Facebook has gathered about their browsing habits outside the social network. The tool, Off-Facebook Activity, allows users to view the hundreds of sites and apps that share data and customer information with Facebook. They can then erase the data it they want.” Not available in the US yet, unfortunately, but if you’re in Ireland, South Korea, or Spain, you’re in luck.

Engadget: Twitter bans advertising from state-controlled news outlets

Engadget: Twitter bans advertising from state-controlled news outlets. “Twitter announced today that it will no longer accept advertising from state-controlled news outlets. Those accounts will still be able to use the platform, but not its advertising. The change comes after China’s state-backed media outlet Xinhua sponsored ads attacking Hong Kong protestors.”

Instagram ‘fact’ pages make money through misinformation; IG and FTC say they don’t necessarily violate policies (Poynter)

Poynter: Instagram ‘fact’ pages make money through misinformation; IG and FTC say they don’t necessarily violate policies. “If you’ve been on Instagram lately, you’ve probably come across some pretty wild ‘facts.’ Like this one from @diplyfacts, which says, ‘Lack of sleep can cause your brain to eat itself.’… Some of these posts go viral, gaining hundreds of thousands of likes and shares. While some of the content might seem inconsequential, there’s one glaring problem with these posts: Many of their handles include the word ‘fact,’ when they simply aren’t.”

CNN: Websites that peddle disinformation make millions of dollars in ads, new study finds

CNN: Websites that peddle disinformation make millions of dollars in ads, new study finds. “As the United States gears up for another presidential election, aware of the role online disinformation played in 2016, the business of publishing false or extremist content online remains a lucrative one. At least $235 million in revenue is generated annually from ads running on extremist and disinformation websites, according to a new study from the Global Disinformation Index provided exclusively to CNN ahead of its September release.” Lying is more lucrative than telling the truth? Now there’s a thought that’ll make your mouth sour.

BloombergQuint: DOJ Scrutinizes Google Advertising, Search in Antitrust Probe

BloombergQuint: DOJ Scrutinizes Google Advertising, Search in Antitrust Probe. “The Justice Department is scrutinizing Google’s digital advertising and search operations as authorities gear up a broad antitrust review of the market power of giant internet companies, according to people familiar with the matter.”

The Atlantic: Instagram Wants Memers to Like It Again

The Atlantic: Instagram Wants Memers to Like It Again. “Today, the company is announcing that it’s looking to hire its first-ever strategic-partnerships manager specifically to focus on meme accounts and what the company calls ‘digital publishers,’ social-based media companies including @TheShadeRoom, @OverheardLA, @CommentsbyCelebs, and @Betches.”