A Day Care and a Dog Rescue Benefit: On Facebook, They Were Political Ads (New York Times)

New York Times: A Day Care and a Dog Rescue Benefit: On Facebook, They Were Political Ads. “What do a day care center, a vegetarian restaurant, a hair salon, an outdoor clothing maker and an investigative news publisher have in common? To Facebook, they looked suspiciously like political activists.”

BBC News: Children exposed to horror film ads on YouTube

BBC News: Children exposed to horror film ads on YouTube. “Children were left distressed after seeing ads for a horror film on YouTube, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has revealed. Three parents contacted the ASA after their children saw ads for Insidious: The Last Key – rated 15 in the UK. One ad for the film was shown before videos of songs from Frozen, instructions for building a Lego fire station and a clip from the cartoon PJ Masks.”

ProPublica: Facebook’s Screening for Political Ads Nabs News Sites Instead of Politicians

ProPublica: Facebook’s Screening for Political Ads Nabs News Sites Instead of Politicians. “One ad couldn’t have been more obviously political. Targeted to people aged 18 and older, it urged them to ‘vote YES’ on June 5 on a ballot proposition to issue bonds for schools in a district near San Francisco. Yet it showed up in users’ news feeds without the ‘paid for by’ disclaimer required for political ads under Facebook’s new policy designed to prevent a repeat of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Nor does it appear, as it should, in Facebook’s new archive of political ads.”

Lifehacker: How Internet Ads Follow You Around

Lifehacker: How Internet Ads Follow You Around. “Internet ads are so invasive that we can’t blame you for thinking that Facebook is listening to you talk. It’s probably not, but it is helping ad networks track you across the internet and across your apps. Tech public policy expert Chris Yiu recently tweeted 14 different ways that ads follow you around the internet, even when you’re logged out, in incognito, using a different browser, or on a new device.”

BuzzFeed: Facebook Just Launched An Excruciatingly Difficult Tool To Rate Advertisers

BuzzFeed: Facebook Just Launched An Excruciatingly Difficult Tool To Rate Advertisers. “Facebook rolled out a new tool Tuesday that allows you to leave feedback about vendors and your shopping experiences after clicking on a business ad. There’s a teeny problem though: The tool is buried within a series of Facebook menus.”

Recode: The podcast business is still teeny tiny. Which is great news for podcasts.

Recode: The podcast business is still teeny tiny. Which is great news for podcasts.. “Do you like podcasts? Me too. It’s sort of nuts to imagine a time before podcasts, right? Podcasts are the future. Podcasts podcasts podcasts. You know who’s not sold on podcasts? At all? Advertisers. They’re spending close to nothing on podcasts.”

Digital Content Next: Facebook’s political ad disclosures are a train wreck in progress

Digital Content Next: Facebook’s political ad disclosures are a train wreck in progress. “So far… the disclosure rules at Facebook are not just a work in progress, but more of a train wreck in progress, as flaws with Facebook’s new rules are already emerging. The social giant was supposed to archive all political ads publicly but missed some, and critics have complained that they aren’t giving enough information about how the ads are targeted. And some many publishers are getting caught up in the rules and can’t boost their own political stories on Facebook without jumping through hoops. An effort by the News Media Alliance to get publishers whitelisted has started, but so far Facebook doesn’t have plans to do that. It’s clear that more overarching, consistent rules across social media and the web — not just from Facebook and other tech giants — are needed to monitor political ads on the internet.”