Never mind the naysayers: Emoji are a vital part of online communication (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Never mind the naysayers: Emoji are a vital part of online communication. “The emergence of emoticons and emoji has been driven by rapid technological changes as the Internet became a dominant force for global mass communication. It has brought along with it the usual handwringing from change-averse elders about how their usage is destroying language. But far from being a unique feature of the Internet era, [Philip] Seargeant argues that human beings have long sought to find these kinds of visual shortcuts to indicate tone.”

Phys .org: Trump’s Twitter communication style shifted over time based on varying communication goals

Phys .org: Trump’s Twitter communication style shifted over time based on varying communication goals. “While many journalists and academics have analysed the topics and sentiment of Trump’s tweets, the range of different rhetorical strategies and discursive styles deployed by Donald Trump is not well studied. The authors of the study downloaded the corpus of tweets sent from the @realDonaldTrump Twitter account from 2009 and 2018 preserved in the Trump Twitter Archive. By analysing patterns of grammatical co-occurence, the authors were able to identify four general style variations of Trump’s tweets: 1) conversational; 2) campaigning; 3) advisory; 4) engaged, and to observe how these stylistic patterns shifted over time.”

USA Today: Grammarly’s latest tool will tell you if your text comes across too harshly

USA Today: Grammarly’s latest tool will tell you if your text comes across too harshly . “Called Tone Detector, the tool will encourage you to consider rephrasing an email when your intended message may get lost on the reader. It will tell you how your message may sound to the person you’re sending it to.”

The Next Web: This blank Google doc restored our faith in humanity

The Next Web: This blank Google doc restored our faith in humanity. “This week, one of our writers wrote about how he trolled a spammy person by jumping into their bad PR pitch which was unfortunately sent in a public Google doc. We turned their blockchain pitch into a truly Avante Garde and crowd-sourced art project. We were inspired by the results and immediately began to think of other ways we could use crowdsourcing to avoid doing work.”

Dark side of fandom: Study on Blue Jays fan tweets argues sports aren’t always unifying (National Post)

National Post: Dark side of fandom: Study on Blue Jays fan tweets argues sports aren’t always unifying. “After sifting through thousands of tweets about the Toronto Blue Jays, a researcher in Regina is challenging the notion that fandom has a magical ability to unite people. It was a notion peddled constantly during the Jays’ electrifying reign as a playoff contender in 2015 and 2016 – beer commercials, politicians in ball caps, all heralding the official Blue Jays slogan: Come Together. But according to University of Regina PhD candidate Katie Sveinson, Blue Jays fans on Twitter give a starker portrait.”

FreeCodeCamp: We just released 3 years of freeCodeCamp chat history as Open Data — all 5 million messages of it

FreeCodeCamp: We just released 3 years of freeCodeCamp chat history as Open Data — all 5 million messages of it. “This dataset is a record of activity from freeCodeCamp’s most popular chatroom, the general chatroom, which the Gitter team has told me is the most active room on all of Gitter. The dataset contains posts from learners, bots, moderators, and contributors between December 31, 2014 and December 9, 2017.”

WUSF: USF Alum Builds Bridges With The ‘Un-Facebook’

WUSF: USF Alum Builds Bridges With The ‘Un-Facebook’ . “While social media platforms like Facebook use algorithms to push users towards people and groups that share the same ideas and beliefs, a new platform co-created by a University of South Florida alum encourages communication between people of different mindsets. ‘It’s breaks you out of that echo chamber, that bubble,’ said Will Cohen, one of the brains behind the website Bridges. ‘You’re actually able to connect with others and experience other different forms of opinions and ideologies.'”