New York Times: How to Grieve for Online Friends You Had Never Met in Person

New York Times: How to Grieve for Online Friends You Had Never Met in Person. “More than ever before, we are using our smartphones and technology to form meaningful relationships with virtual strangers, both in romance and friendship; we celebrate one another’s successes, share our individual struggles, and despite geographical limitations, these bonds often span years. But what happens when the person on the other side of the screen dies?”

University at Buffalo: Your Facebook friends don’t mean it, but they’re likely hurting you daily

University at Buffalo: Your Facebook friends don’t mean it, but they’re likely hurting you daily . “Social media sites often present users with social exclusion information that may actually inhibit intelligent thought, according to the co-author of a University at Buffalo study that takes a critical look not just at Facebook and other similar platforms, but at the peculiarities of the systems on which these sites operate. The short-term effects of these posts create negative emotions in the users who read them, and may affect thought processes in ways that make users more susceptible to advertising messages.”

Megan Squire: Deep dive into data sheds light on toxic online commmunities (Elon University)

Elon University: Megan Squire: Deep dive into data sheds light on toxic online commmunities. “For her work in the area of open online communities and open source software, Squire has generated international acclaim as a global leader in the area. In 2004, Squire launched FLOSSmole, an online effort to gather, share and analyze data from free and open source software projects that has offered insight into how computer programmers interact with each other and online communities.”

Nieman Lab: Public or closed? How much activity really exists? See how other news organizations’ Facebook Groups are faring

Nieman Lab: Public or closed? How much activity really exists? See how other news organizations’ Facebook Groups are faring. “We analyzed the data of about 30 groups — as large as 40,000 members and as small as 300, from international organizations to local publishers. About half were public groups (so anyone can join) and half were closed (users have to answer screening questions to gain entry); some were pop-ups and others have been around for years. Most of the data we have is from July 2017 to July 2018, or from the group’s start date til then if the group was created in the past year. With so many variables we can’t quite make definitive claims, but here’s our attempt to generalize some of the data.”

University of Utah: Following Twitter Conversations Around Hacked Diabetes Tools To Manage Blood Sugar

University of Utah: Following Twitter Conversations Around Hacked Diabetes Tools To Manage Blood Sugar. “The diabetes online community is leading grassroots efforts focused on accelerating the development, access and adoption of diabetes-related tools to manage the disease. Researchers at University of Utah Health examined the community’s online Twitter conversation to understand their thoughts concerning open source artificial pancreas (OpenAPS) technology. The results of this study are available online in the September 10 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology.”

CNET: How Reddit helped me tackle my biggest insecurity

CNET: How Reddit helped me tackle my biggest insecurity. “Like many preteens going through puberty, I had acne. And like many preteens suffering from the problem, I was mortified by it. Starting when I was 12, each new blistering breakout made me anxious to go outside (let alone attend school), talk to my classmates and meet new people. While my skin cleared up a bit once I emerged from the universally awkward hell known as adolescence, I still have leftover facial scarring and intermittent breakouts that make me apprehensive to appear in photos or CNET videos without makeup. But recently, I’ve begun to embrace this lingering insecurity. And surprisingly, it all stems from Reddit, a site many consider to be the most toxic place on the internet because of the infamous vitriol and trolling by some of its millions and millions of anonymous users.”

New York Times: Fringe Figures Find Refuge in Facebook’s Private Groups

New York Times: Fringe Figures Find Refuge in Facebook’s Private Groups. [Alex] Jones built his Facebook audience on pages — the big public megaphones he used to blast links, memes and videos to millions of his followers. In recent months, though, he and other large-scale purveyors of inflammatory speech have found refuge in private groups, where they can speak more openly with less fear of being punished for incendiary posts.”