Rolling Stone: Extremists Shared TikTok Videos on How to Access White House via Tunnels, Feds Say

Rolling Stone: Extremists Shared TikTok Videos on How to Access White House via Tunnels, Feds Say. “Domestic extremists used TikTok, an app best known for short videos and viral dances, to spread information about bringing guns to the January 6th Capitol attack and accessing the White House through tunnels, according to a Homeland Security briefing.”

Business Insider: Pictures of Swastikas temporarily replaced Wikipedia pages for Jennifer Lopez, Ben Affleck

Business Insider: Pictures of Swastikas temporarily replaced Wikipedia pages for Jennifer Lopez, Ben Affleck. “Dozens of Wikipedia pages were temporarily replaced with pictures of Swastikas Monday morning. The changes, which were only in place for a few minutes before the pages reverted to their usual contents, removed all the text and images from the pages and replaced them with a bright red background and large Swastika image, which is also the German Nazi Party’s flag.”

Engadget: Homeland Security may use companies to find extremism on social media

Engadget: Homeland Security may use companies to find extremism on social media. “The Department of Homeland Security might not rely solely on in-house systems to spot extremist threats on social media. Intelligence officer and initiative leader John Cohen told the Wall Street Journal in an interview that Homeland Security is looking at hiring companies to analyze social networks for signs of impending terrorism and other extremist violence. The department had been studying social media before, but the outside partners would help “dramatically” expand these efforts, Cohen said.”

Daily Beast: Trump’s Favorite Dictator Fueling New Pro-Hitler Movement

Daily Beast: Trump’s Favorite Dictator Fueling New Pro-Hitler Movement. “The movement’s digital goosestepping is being led by a small handful of Nazis claiming connections to the Egyptian Armed Forces on Telegram, who are also attempting to build a community on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. At the center of the network is a branded, cloud-based storage drive being shared across a series of Telegram channels as well as Facebook pages and profiles, containing 16,922 multilingual pieces of Nazi footage, photos, text, and Holocaust denial videos, all meticulously ordered in 416 folders. Repeated calls to the Egyptian military’s media office went unanswered.”

Ars Technica: If YouTube’s algorithms radicalize people, it’s hard to tell from the data

Ars Technica: If YouTube’s algorithms radicalize people, it’s hard to tell from the data. “…there has been a steady stream of stories about how the process has radicalized people, sending them down an ever-deepening rabbit hole until all their viewing is dominated by fringe ideas and conspiracy theories. A new study released on Monday looks at whether these stories represent a larger trend or are just a collection of anecdotes. While the data can’t rule out the existence of online radicalization, it definitely suggests that it’s not the most common experience. Instead, it seems like fringe ideas are simply part of a larger self-reinforcing community.”

Reuters: Facebook and tech giants to target attacker manifestos, far-right militias in database

Reuters: Facebook and tech giants to target attacker manifestos, far-right militias in database. “A counterterrorism organization formed by some of the biggest U.S. tech companies including Facebook and Microsoft is significantly expanding the types of extremist content shared between firms in a key database, aiming to crack down on material from white supremacists and far-right militias, the group told Reuters.”

Opinion: This San Francisco-based website is neo-Nazis’ favorite to spread their hatred (SF Gate)

SF Gate: Opinion: This San Francisco-based website is neo-Nazis’ favorite to spread their hatred. “For the past decade, Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) research has been exposing the Internet Archive’s enabling of Al-Qaeda, ISIS and other jihadi propaganda efforts and its function as a database for their distribution of materials, recruitment campaigns, incitement of violence, fundraising and even daily radio programs. We wrote that ISIS liked the platform because there was no way to flag objectionable content for review and removal — unlike on other platforms such as YouTube. Today, the Internet Archive enables neo-Nazis and white supremacists in the same ways, and its terms of use still deny responsibility for content uploaded to it.”

Homeland Security Today: One Year After Facebook Takes Steps to Remove Boogaloo Content, Movement Resurfaces on Platform

Homeland Security Today: One Year After Facebook Takes Steps to Remove Boogaloo Content, Movement Resurfaces on Platform. “In June 2020, Facebook announced that it had taken down hundreds of groups and pages on its platform associated with the violent anti-government boogaloo movement, one of several major purges of extremist material by Facebook that year to address extremists’ use of its platform…. However, in recent months, several new boogaloo pages have emerged on Facebook, hiding among libertarian groups and pages that also share memes advocating for violence.”

Daily Beast: YouTube Permanently Bans Right Wing Watch, a Media Watchdog Devoted to Exposing Right-Wing Conspiracies

Daily Beast: YouTube Permanently Bans Right Wing Watch, a Media Watchdog Devoted to Exposing Right-Wing Conspiracies. “According to Right Wing Watch, their appeal of the suspension was also denied by YouTube, which again claimed that the watchdog group—which monitors disinformation, conspiracies, and violent rhetoric from far-right media outlets and personalities—was in violation of its guidelines and terms of service. Meanwhile, many of the far-right extremists merely exposed by RWW remain on the platform.”