Los Angeles Times: In UC’s battle with the world’s largest scientific publisher, the future of information is at stake

Los Angeles Times: In UC’s battle with the world’s largest scientific publisher, the future of information is at stake. “Boiled down to dollars and cents, the battle between the University of California, the nation’s premier producer of academic research, and Reed Elsevier, the world’s leading publisher of academic journals, can seem almost trivial. UC is paying almost $11 million this year for subscriptions to some 1,500 Elsevier journals. That’s not much when measured against the university’s core budget of $9.3 billion. But in fact it’s a very big deal — big enough for the university to consider dropping the subscriptions entirely when its current five-year contract with Elsevier expires on Dec. 31. Scores of town hall meetings for UC faculty to discuss the ongoing negotiations between UC and Elsevier have been scheduled across the system as the deadline approaches. What faculty are likely to hear, in the words of Jeff MacKie-Mason, the university librarian at UC Berkeley, is that ‘we’re pretty far apart at this point.'”

People and plants: Working together for the planet (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: People and plants: Working together for the planet . “Plants, People, Planet, a cross-disciplinary Open Access journal, launches today with its first issue. Plants, People, Planet will publish peer-reviewed articles, opinion and review that focuses on the connections between plant science and society. The new journal aims to celebrate everything new, innovative and exciting in plant sciences that is relevant to society and peoples’ daily lives.”

Undark: A Request to Streamline Federal Document Purges Has Researchers on Edge

Undark: A Request to Streamline Federal Document Purges Has Researchers on Edge. “Of course, document archiving — and destruction — is routine at all federal agencies, and only between 1 and 3 percent of federal records are ever retained permanently. Maintenance typically follows a set schedule, whereby records — both digital and paper — are retained for a set period of time before being shredded, mulched, or, in the case of electronic documents, simply erased or made unreadable. In this case, however, the [Department of the Interior] is seeking permission from the National Archives to consolidate pre-existing schedules into what the National Archives calls ‘big buckets,’ meaning requests for eliminating records could be made in larger groups.”

Technical .ly: Cypher Philly, a project born from a meetup, wants to unlock the power of open data

Technical .ly: Cypher Philly, a project born from a meetup, wants to unlock the power of open data. “For Cypher Philly founder Jess Mason, the copious amounts of open data produced every year by OpenDataPhilly needed another layer that could maximize their potential impact. It’s why he set out — alongside cofounder Jason Cox and about 40 volunteers — to build an application that can connect the dots between data sets meant for transparency and higher government efficiency.”

The Verge: Google, Apple, and Uber must share mapping data with rivals, says UK data group

The Verge: Google, Apple, and Uber must share mapping data with rivals, says UK data group. “Tech companies like Google, Apple, and Uber should be forced to share mapping data with rivals firms and the public sector, the UK government has been advised by a data advocacy group.”

EurekAlert: New open access database for medieval literature

EurekAlert: New open access database for medieval literature . “Norse World is a new database which will make it easier for researchers to study perceptions of the surrounding world in Medieval Scandinavian literature. The new tool is a digital resource aimed at researchers in fields such as language history and philology, comparative literature, manuscript studies and digital humanities. It will be freely available to both researchers and the public.”

TechCrunch: Flickr’s new business model could see works deleted from Creative Commons

TechCrunch: Flickr’s new business model could see works deleted from Creative Commons . “Following yesterday’s series of announcements about Flickr’s plans to revamp its site under its new owners, SmugMug, one major concern has been raised: its decision to now limit free accounts to 1,000 photos may impact the number of photos available through Creative Commons.”