University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts. “Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients.”

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free. “The long-standing debate over open access to research results has been marked by a geographic divide. In Europe, some public funders have launched a high-profile open-access initiative, dubbed Plan S, that would ultimately require grantees to publish only in journals that immediately make papers free to all. But in the United States, federal agencies have stuck to a decade-old policy that allows grantees to publish in journals that keep papers behind a paywall for up to 1 year. Now, the divide is starting to blur, with one prominent U.S. research program starting to require immediate open access to the peer-reviewed publications it funds.”

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons

StateScoop: Crowdsourced environment data gets a home on Louisville Data Commons. “The ‘Louisville Data Commons’ repository, announced by the University of Louisville on Tuesday, is an open-data website that will incorporate data contributions from residents and researchers to keep track of the city’s environmental and health-related measurements. The community-gathered data will be available for research for a minimum of one year, according to the site, while some larger, frequently updated data sets will be available indefinitely.”

BBC: Facebook uses AI to map Thailand’s roads

BBC: Facebook uses AI to map Thailand’s roads. “Facebook has used artificial intelligence (AI) to map 300,000 miles of previously unmapped roads in Thailand and made the results available to the public. The project had been completed in 18 months, less than half the time it would have taken 100 mapping experts to do it manually, Facebook said.”

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database

UKAuthority: TfL launches Cycling Infrastructure Database. “Transport for London (TfL) has launched the Cycling Infrastructure Database for the city, describing it as the largest of its kind. It contains the location of more than 240,000 pieces of infrastructure such as cycle lanes and parking spaces, and has been made available to all of London’s boroughs and released as open data for third party developers.”

Nature: The plan to mine the world’s research papers

Nature: The plan to mine the world’s research papers. “Carl Malamud is on a crusade to liberate information locked up behind paywalls — and his campaigns have scored many victories. He has spent decades publishing copyrighted legal documents, from building codes to court records, and then arguing that such texts represent public-domain law that ought to be available to any citizen online. Sometimes, he has won those arguments in court. Now, the 60-year-old American technologist is turning his sights on a new objective: freeing paywalled scientific literature. And he thinks he has a legal way to do it.”