Techdirt: It’s Time For The Academic World To See The Positive Side Of Negative Results

Techdirt: It’s Time For The Academic World To See The Positive Side Of Negative Results. “Techdirt has written many times about the need to move from traditional academic publishing to open access. There are many benefits, including increasing the reach and impact of research, and allowing members of the public to read work that they have often funded, without needing to pay again. But open access is not a panacea; it does not solve all the problems of today’s approach to spreading knowledge. In particular, it suffers from the same serious flaw that afflicts traditional titles: a tendency to focus on success, and to draw a veil of silence over failure.”

Society of Architectural Historians: Society of Architectural Historians and UVA Press Launch Open-Access SAH Archipedia

Society of Architectural Historians: Society of Architectural Historians and UVA Press Launch Open-Access SAH Archipedia. “SAH Archipedia contains histories, photographs and maps for over 20,000 structures and places, and showcases the richness and diversity of architecture and landscapes throughout the U.S. Building entries include scholar-written, peer-reviewed narrative histories, photographs, precise geospatial coordinates using Google Maps/OpenStreetMap, and structural and descriptive metadata that includes semantic tags for architects and firms, periods, styles, materials and types.”

PR Newswire: Macmillan Learning Launches a Search Engine Designed for Supplemental OER (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Macmillan Learning Launches a Search Engine Designed for Supplemental OER (PRESS RELEASE). “Macmillan Learning announced the availability of Intellus Search, a new search engine designed to make it simpler for instructors to discover free and relevant supplemental materials. While nearly three quarters of professors require textbooks for their courses, a recent study from the Babson Group found many also require supplemental materials like articles/case studies (47%) and videos (28%). Intellus Search offers hundreds of educator-selected OER (Open Educational Resources) per course.”

StateTech Magazine: Cities Support Open-Data Programs to Improve the Lives of Citizens

StateTech Magazine: Cities Support Open-Data Programs to Improve the Lives of Citizens. “Citizens like to know what’s happening around them, and Philadelphia’s open-data program provides the means by which residents can view data by their address. Anyone with a computer in an open-data city can find information on isolated incidents and also chronic issues that impact the community. In her three years with the program, Kistine Carolan, Philadelphia’s open-data program manager, has seen open-data government incorporated in academic research, business activity and civic engagement. Nonprofits have conducted open-data program evaluations, and journalists cite it in their reporting, she adds.”

Science: More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature

Science: More than 700 German research institutions strike open-access deal with Springer Nature. “A consortium of more than 700 German research institutions and libraries today announced an agreement with publisher Springer Nature to make it simpler for authors to publish their papers open access. The agreement is the largest national open-access deal to date, but it doesn’t allow authors to publish open access in Nature or its sister journals.”

University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

University of Alberta: First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts. “Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients.”

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free

Science: In departure for NIH, Cancer Moonshot requires grantees to make papers immediately free. “The long-standing debate over open access to research results has been marked by a geographic divide. In Europe, some public funders have launched a high-profile open-access initiative, dubbed Plan S, that would ultimately require grantees to publish only in journals that immediately make papers free to all. But in the United States, federal agencies have stuck to a decade-old policy that allows grantees to publish in journals that keep papers behind a paywall for up to 1 year. Now, the divide is starting to blur, with one prominent U.S. research program starting to require immediate open access to the peer-reviewed publications it funds.”