Quartz: The EPA just revealed that staffers destroyed files under audit

Quartz: The EPA just revealed that staffers destroyed files under audit . “Employees at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) destroyed records they knew were being audited, a new memo posted to a government database reveals.”

MuckRock: MuckRock gives a state-by-state look at your public records law

MuckRock: MuckRock gives a state-by-state look at your public records law. “There are 50 state records laws (51 counting Washington D.C.) all with different statutes, exemptions, and limitations that dictate what you can get from your state and local agencies. With the rules of access differing across the board, MuckRock provides an easy way to keep track of them all through our interactive database showcasing the best, the worst, and the confusing parts of state records law.”

Maps and data freedom: How one man wants to put historic maps of Ottawa… on the map (Apt 613)

Apt 613: Maps and data freedom: How one man wants to put historic maps of Ottawa… on the map. “With a little more effort, Bryan [Frankfurth] believes, all this kind of information could be open and transparent. As part this, he has started Free the Pixels, an initiative to encourage Library and Archives to make Canada’s records of its collective history and culture to become more accessible for everyone, as part of the government’s commitment to open data and information. Bryan believes this will not only make it easier for Canadians to learn and enjoy about their own history, but it would also open up opportunities for research, innovation, and creativity.”

Google Blog: Doing our part to share open data responsibly

Google Blog: Doing our part to share open data responsibly. “This past weekend marked Open Data Day, an annual celebration of making data freely available to everyone. Communities around the world organized events, and we’re taking a moment here at Google to share our own perspective on the importance of open data. More accessible data can meaningfully help people and organizations, and we’re doing our part by opening datasets, providing access to APIs and aggregated product data, and developing tools to make data more accessible and useful.”

Phys .org: All publicly funded Australian research could soon be free for you, the taxpayer, to read

Phys .org: All publicly funded Australian research could soon be free for you, the taxpayer, to read. “What happens to research that is funded by taxpayers? A lot ends up in subscription-only journals, protected from the eyes of most by a paywall. But a new initiative known as Plan S could change that. Plan S focuses on making all publicly funded research immediately fully and freely available by open access publication.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing. “Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year. There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?”

University of Maryland School of Medicine: UMSOM Scientists Call for Unrestricted Usage of Public Genome Data

University of Maryland School of Medicine: UMSOM Scientists Call for Unrestricted Usage of Public Genome Data. “Researchers at the Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for open access to genome data, stating that unrestricted usage is needed for progress in combatting the world’s most serious diseases. Scientific progress relies on unconditional access to data that is hosted in open and accessible repositories, a group of genomic research leaders that included top IGS faculty stated in an article published in Science. They noted that while there are valid concerns and misconceptions about the rights of data producers, what is needed are clear, unambiguous guidelines for data usage.”