Satellite Journalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts

SatelliteJournalism: Best practices for working with satellite data — what I learned from the experts. “Satellites orbiting the earth are collecting vast amounts of data about our planet — much of it openly available to the public. For reporters, this offers unique opportunities for original investigations and visual storytelling. But how do you get started? And what should you be looking out for? I spoke to four journalists who regularly work with satellite data about how to start, best practices and most importantly — mistakes to avoid.”

NPR: The FBI Keeps Using Clues From Volunteer Sleuths To Find The Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters

NPR: The FBI Keeps Using Clues From Volunteer Sleuths To Find The Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters. “As rioters made their way through the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, many of them livestreamed their actions and posted photos and videos on social media. That steady stream of content created an enormous record of evidence that law enforcement needed to sift through to build cases against the accused. Now, more than 575 federal criminal complaints have been filed, and a striking pattern has emerged: Time and time again, the FBI is relying on crowdsourced tips from an ad hoc community of amateur investigators sifting through that pile of content for clues.”

Learn how to enhance your investigative reporting in platforms: Register for new Knight Center course (Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas)

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas: Learn how to enhance your investigative reporting in platforms: Register for new Knight Center course. “‘Investigative reporting in platforms: How to dig into social accounts, images, ads, and messaging apps’ runs from Sept. 6 to Oct. 10, 2021. Craig Silverman and Jane Lytvynenko, two leading experts on online disinformation, fake news, and digital investigations, will teach the five-week course, which also focuses on workflows and organization for the information you’ll gather.” It’s not free, but $95 for a five-week class like that sounds like a bargain.

Tools for Reporters: Who did that website belong to?

Tools for Reporters: Who did that website belong to?. “You may already be familiar with WHOIS, the directory of website registrants. Under ICANN rules, you have to have contact info registered for a domain, and that contact info used to be public. Sadly, that changed in 2018 and much of the information is now redacted. But! A tool called WHOIS History Search came to the rescue.” There’s a certain amount of free searching you can do but getting details will cost you.

The Verge: How to find the documents behind big legal cases

The Verge: How to find the documents behind big legal cases. “Earlier this year, I spent a month covering the trial for a dispute between Apple and Epic. The case was one of the biggest antitrust suits in recent memory, and it brought to light revelations about both companies and the larger tech industry, often in the form of legal filings. I (and other reporters) try to pick out the most relevant details from these filings for readers. But sometimes, the documents are worth checking out in their own right. A site called CourtListener makes that easier than it might sound — if you know how to look.”

‘Sedition Hunters’: Meet The Online Sleuths Aiding The FBI’s Capitol Manhunt (HuffPost)

HuffPost: ‘Sedition Hunters’: Meet The Online Sleuths Aiding The FBI’s Capitol Manhunt. “They call themselves sedition hunters, and they have receipts. They’re members of a loosely affiliated network of motivated individuals and pop-up volunteer organizations with names like Deep State Dogs and Capitol Terrorists Exposers that developed after the Jan. 6 attack to identify the Trump supporters who organized the Capitol riot and brutalized the law enforcement officers protecting the building.”

Global Investigative Journalism Network: Tips for Using the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine in Your Next Investigation

Global Investigative Journalism Network: Tips for Using the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine in Your Next Investigation. “There are many ways journalists, researchers, fact checkers, activists, and the general public access the free-to-use Wayback Machine every day. Several thousand articles have been written about us, or reference our services. In fact, in GIJN’s My Favorite Tools series wrap for 2020, several leading investigative journalists identified it as a mainstay of their work. Following is an introduction for reporters interested in trying out the Wayback Machine for their next investigation.”

Huffington Post: The Hidden Hand Of Facial Recognition In The Capitol Insurrection Manhunt

Huffington Post: The Hidden Hand Of Facial Recognition In The Capitol Insurrection Manhunt. “Facial recognition tools use one or more pictures of an individual to pull their biometric facial characteristics, and run them against an often gargantuan database of photos to find possible matches. In criminal justice matters, this can help create a narrowed pool of suspects. This software is not always accurate, though ― and its use bears serious implications for privacy, freedom of expression and other civil liberties.”

HuffPost: Citizen Sleuths Launch A Slick New Website To Hunt Down Capitol Insurrectionists

HuffPost: Citizen Sleuths Launch A Slick New Website To Hunt Down Capitol Insurrectionists. “The website… was built by a small team of volunteer software developers, using the work of open-source investigators looking into the deadly Capitol attack. The site features a color-coded timeline that reflects the time of day, and allows users to click around on a map of the Capitol and pull up any video evidence from a particular location and time frame. Users can even track an individual suspect’s movements over the course of Jan. 6.”

NiemanLab: After the Capitol riots, platforms, archivists, conspiracists, and investigators collide

NiemanLab: After the Capitol riots, platforms, archivists, conspiracists, and investigators collide. “Some of the entries in our 2021 predictions package proved gloomily prescient this week as a mob stormed the Capitol, incited by Trump’s baseless claims that he won the election. ‘A lot of America slipped into conspiracy thinking during this pandemic, and they got there from yoga Instagrams and NFL forums and private church choir Facebook groups that were systematically invaded by QAnon and anti-vax recruiters,’ NBC’s Ben Collins had written in his prediction. ‘It’s going to be a rude awakening in the next few months as we find out which of our friends got sucked into truly astonishing tales of New World Orders and Great Resets that helped them cope — and just so happen to be spectacularly wrong.’”

Wired: Open-source sleuths are already unmasking the Capitol Hill mob

Wired: Open-source sleuths are already unmasking the Capitol Hill mob. “While the mob was still in the Capitol building multiple groups, including Bellingcat, started to scrape everything being posted – a vast digital archive of the riots. Reddit users created a 12GB tranche of videos, Bellingcat’s spreadsheet has more than 100 examples of streams or videos and a database by search engine and data archive Intelligence X has more than 1,300 files totalling 83GB.”

The Daily Swig: GHunt OSINT tool sniffs out Google users’ account information using just their email address

The Daily Swig: GHunt OSINT tool sniffs out Google users’ account information using just their email address . “GHunt lets individuals, or security experts, analyze a target’s Google ‘footprint’ based just on an email. The open source intelligence, or OSINT, tool can extract the account owner’s name and Google ID, YouTube channel, and active Google services, including Photos and Maps. GHunt can also reveal public photos, phone model, make, firmware and installed software, and potentially, the user’s physical location.”