Ars Technica: Widely used open source software contained bitcoin-stealing backdoor

Ars Technica: Widely used open source software contained bitcoin-stealing backdoor. “A hacker or hackers sneaked a backdoor into a widely used open source code library with the aim of surreptitiously stealing funds stored in bitcoin wallets, software developers said Monday. The malicious code was inserted in two stages into event-stream, a code library with 2 million downloads that’s used by Fortune 500 companies and small startups alike.”

BetaNews: Looking for an open source password manager? Give Bitwarden a spin

BetaNews: Looking for an open source password manager? Give Bitwarden a spin. “Everyone needs a password manager to surf the web safely — they enable you to set virtually crack-proof passwords for all your online accounts, plus store a range of other sensitive data too, all locked behind a single master password. If you’re unsatisfied with your current offering, or looking to support an open source alternative, then look at 8bit Solutions LLC’s Bitwarden 1.10.0 and Bitwarden for mobile 1.19.4.”

Microsoft: we’ve got your back, Linux, here are 60,000 patents to protect you (Neowin)

Neowin: Microsoft: we’ve got your back, Linux, here are 60,000 patents to protect you . “Microsoft loves Linux. And it really wants to prove it. In lieu of a wedding ring, the company has decided to show its dedication to open-source software by joining the Open Innovation Network (OIN), a community designed to protect Linux and other open-source software from legal liability. As part of its grand gesture, the company is also planning on making 60,000 of its patents public, and making them available to the OIN.”

The Register: Microsoft open-sources Infer.NET AI code just in time for the weekend

The Register: Microsoft open-sources Infer.NET AI code just in time for the weekend . “The sharing of Microsoft’s toys continued today with the open-sourcing of its model-based machine-learning framework, Infer.NET. A team at Microsoft’s research centre in Cambridge, UK, kicked off development of the framework in 2004, and it was released for academic use in 2008. In Microsoft’s brave new world of AI, the technology has found itself evolving into a machine-learning engine and creeping into Office and Azure as well as gaming applications on Xbox.”

BetaNews: Microsoft re-open-sources early versions of MS-DOS on GitHub

BetaNews: Microsoft re-open-sources early versions of MS-DOS on GitHub. “Back in 2014, Microsoft gave the source code for MS-DOS 1.25 and MS-DOS 2.0 to the Computer History Museum. Now — in a move it describes as ‘re-open-sourcing’ — the company has pushed the code to GitHub for all to see.” I am feeling old and creaky.

BetaNews: Tim Berners-Lee launches open source project Solid to decentralize the web and place users in control of data

BetaNews: Tim Berners-Lee launches open source project Solid to decentralize the web and place users in control of data. “Tim Berners-Lee is famous for inventing the world wide web, and now he’s ready to take things to the next level with an ambitious open source project called Solid. Noting that the web has become ‘an engine of inequity and division’, Berners-Lee wants to restore the power and agency of individuals online and move the balance of power away from ‘powerful forces who use it for their own agendas’.”

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections

Yale News: Online search tool ‘lifting a veil’ on Yale’s collections. “Archives at Yale, a new software tool launched in early September, allows students, faculty, and other researchers to search more precisely across and within more than 5,000 collections held by 10 Yale libraries and museums. The new tool is based on a widely used open-source web application — which means that Yale’s investment in developing it will benefit other libraries and museums around the world. “