Phys .org: Can I mix those chemicals? There’s an app for that!

Phys .org: Can I mix those chemicals? There’s an app for that!. “Improperly mixed chemicals cause a shocking number of fires, explosions, and injuries in laboratories, businesses, and homes each year. A new open source computer program called ChemStor developed by engineers at the University of California, Riverside, can prevent these dangerous situations by telling users if it is unsafe to mix certain chemicals.”

Wired: An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things

Wired: An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things. “End-to-end encryption is a staple of secure messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal. It ensures that no one—even the app developer—can access your data as it traverses the web. But what if you could bring some version of that protection to increasingly ubiquitous—and notoriously insecure—Internet of Things devices?”

Georgia Tech: Ivan Allen College Archive Project Receives Nearly $100,000 from NEH

Georgia Tech: Ivan Allen College Archive Project Receives Nearly $100,000 from NEH. “The Ivan Allen Archive Project at the Georgia Institute of Technology has received a two-year, $99,991 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to fund the integration of large-scale text processing and data visualization capabilities into the open-source Omeka platform. The grant, announced Jan. 14 by the NEH, will fund further refinement of an existing suite of plug-ins developed by Georgia Tech faculty and students that enables machine-assisted data analysis and social network graphing. The eventual goal is to release the extended toolkit for use by academic and community researchers free of charge.”

EurekAlert: New open-source software judges accuracy of computer predictions of cancer genetics

EurekAlert: New open-source software judges accuracy of computer predictions of cancer genetics. “Because simple clinical methods to test for genetic variation are vulnerable to missing a lot of cell-to-cell variability, recent computer tools have been developed to predict and characterise genetic diversity within clinical tumour samples. However, there is no existing common benchmarking approach to determine the most accurate computational methods. The study, published in Nature Biotechnology, developed open-source software that can be used to judge the accuracy of computer predictions and establish this benchmark.”

Science Blog: Simplifying How Scientists Share Data

Science Blog: Simplifying How Scientists Share Data. “…often, sharing that data with other scientists – or with peer-reviewed journal editors, or funders – is difficult. The software might be proprietary, and prohibitively expensive to purchase. It might take years of training for a person to be able to manage and understand the software. Or the company that created the software might have gone out of business. A research team has developed an open-source data-management system that the scientists hope will solve all of those problems.”

Medium: Google’s Monopoly is Stifling Free Software

Medium: Google’s Monopoly is Stifling Free Software. “Google has an undeniable monopoly on search, and a near-monopoly on web browsing software via Chrome and its forks. And even alternative browsers such as Mozilla’s Firefox reference Google’s Safe Browsing service to decide on the trustworthiness of downloads. Stopping the spread of malware is a laudible goal, but a consequence of this is directly harming free and open source software developers from being able to release their software without paying expensive certificate authority rent-seeking fees.”