ZDNet: IBM’s new tool lets developers add quantum-computing power to machine learning

ZDNet: IBM’s new tool lets developers add quantum-computing power to machine learning. “IBM is releasing a new module as part of its open-source quantum software development kit, Qiskit, to let developers leverage the capabilities of quantum computers to improve the quality of their machine-learning models. Qiskit Machine Learning is now available and includes the computational building blocks that are necessary to bring machine-learning models into the quantum space.”

Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low-quality networks (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low-quality networks. “In a bid to put an end to the all-too-familiar choppy, robotic voice calls that come with low bandwidth, Google is open-sourcing Lyra, a new audio codec that taps machine learning to produce high-quality calls even when faced with a dodgy internet connection.”

GlobeNewswire: Crate. io Open Sources the Entire Codebase of CrateDB – the Database Purpose Built for Machine Data (PRESS RELEASE)

GlobeNewswire: Crate.io Open Sources the Entire Codebase of CrateDB – the Database Purpose Built for Machine Data (PRESS RELEASE). “Crate.io, developer and supplier of CrateDB, the purpose-built database optimized for machine data use cases, today announced that CrateDB is now a fully open source database solution. With today’s release of CrateDB 4.5, all enterprise features of the database are available under the Apache 2.0 open source license for the self-deploy Community edition.”

BellingCat: Launching an Open Source Aircraft Database for Venezuela

Thanks to Tish W. for the heads-up! BellingCat: Launching an Open Source Aircraft Database for Venezuela . “In January 2020, I started an open database of aircraft registered in Venezuela. Using open source flight tracking data and helpful tips from aircraft tracking enthusiasts, the database now includes details on approximately 240 aircraft. The vast majority of these aircraft are registered in Venezuela, but some are foreign-registered with some connection to the country (more on that later).”

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words

Wired: AI and the List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words. “COMEDIAN GEORGE CARLIN had a list of Seven Words You Can’t Say on TV. Parts of the internet have a list of 402 banned words, plus one emoji, 🖕. Slack uses the open source List of Dirty, Naughty, Obscene, and Otherwise Bad Words, found on GitHub, to help groom its search suggestions. Open source mapping project OpenStreetMap uses it to sanitize map edits. Google artificial intelligence researchers recently removed web pages containing any of the words from a dataset used to train a powerful new system for making sense of language.”

TechCrunch: Google open sources Tilt Brush VR software as it shuts down internal development

TechCrunch: Google open sources Tilt Brush VR software as it shuts down internal development . “…the folks at Google announced they had ended active development of Tilt Brush, a VR painting app that was one of virtual reality’s early hit pieces of software. The app allowed users to use virtual reality controllers as brushes to construct digital sculptures and environments. While the company will not be pushing any new updates to the app, they did announce that they will be open sourcing the code on github for developers to build their own experiences and customizations.”

Ghacks: NeeView is an open source image viewer that displays two images simultaneously like pages from a book

Ghacks: NeeView is an open source image viewer that displays two images simultaneously like pages from a book . “Most image viewer programs allow you to view one image at a time. I’m not talking about thumbnails, but a larger view of the pictures. If you want to browse your photo directories and view two images simultaneously, you should try NeeView.”

Found via Reddit: LinkAce

Found via Reddit: LinkAce. From the front page: “LinkAce is a self hosted archive to store and organize links of your favorite websites. Search through them with the help of tags and lists. The content stays available with the help of automated backups and monitoring.” Note that it is a self-hosted Web app, so you’ll need access to a server and some tech chops to use LinkAce. It’s free and open source.

ZDNet: Linux Mint introduces its own take on the Chromium web browser

ZDNet: Linux Mint introduces its own take on the Chromium web browser. “Linux Mint is a very popular Linux desktop distribution. I use the latest version, Mint 20, on my production desktops. That’s partly because, while it’s based on Debian Linux and Ubuntu, it takes its own path. The best example of that is Mint’s excellent homebrew desktop interface, Cinnamon. Now, Mint’s programmers, led by lead developer, Clement ‘Clem’ Lefebvre, have built their own take on Google’s open-source Chromium web browser.”

FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…) (Internet Archive Blog)

Internet Archive Blog: FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…). “I have never been more encouraged and thankful to Free and Open Source communities. Three months ago I posted a request for help with OCR’ing and processing 19th Century Newspapers and we got soooo many offers to help. Thank you, that was heart warming and concretely helpful– already based on these suggestions we are changing over our OCR and PDF software completely to FOSS, making big improvements, and building partnerships with FOSS developers in companies, universities, and as individuals that will propel the Internet Archive to have much better digitized texts.”

Columbia University: New Tool Detects Unsafe Security Practices in Android Apps

Columbia University: New Tool Detects Unsafe Security Practices in Android Apps. “Computer scientists at Columbia Engineering have shown for the first time that it is possible to analyze how thousands of Android apps use cryptography without needing to have the apps’ actual codes. The team’s new tool, CRYLOGGER, can tell when an Android app uses cryptography incorrectly—it detects the so-called ‘cryptographic misuses’ in Android apps. When given a list of rules that should be followed for secure cryptography—guidelines developed by expert cryptographers and organizations such as NIST and IETF that define security standards to protect sensitive data—CRYLOGGER detects violations of these rules.”