Lifehacker: Find Ethical Open-Source Alternatives To Almost Every App or Service With This List

Lifehacker: Find Ethical Open-Source Alternatives To Almost Every App or Service With This List. “We love the convenience and feature-rich nature of the apps and products big corporations can offer you, but we’re also proponents of personal autonomy and control over your online experience. However, it’s one thing to just turn your back on the big corporations; it’s another to do so mindfully and ethically.” A commenter mentions that the list is somewhat UK-centric.

OPEnS Hub: Real-time Data Logging, Connecting Field Sensors to Google Sheets (ScholarsArchive@OSU)

ScholarsArchive@OSU: OPEnS Hub: Real-time Data Logging, Connecting Field Sensors to Google Sheets. “In Earth science, we must often collect data from sensors installed in remote locations. Retrieving these data and storing them can be challenging. Present options include proprietary commercial dataloggers, communication devices, and protocols with rigid software and data structures that may require ongoing expenses. While there are open-source solutions that include telemetry, such as EnviroDIY’s Mayfly, none presently generate real-time, remotely accessible workbooks (EnviroDIY, 2018). The Openly Published Environmental Sensing (OPEnS) Lab developed the OPEnS Hub, a new approach to using low-power, open-source hardware and software to achieve real-time data logging from the field to the web.”

Google Open Source Blog: Open sourcing Science Journal iOS

Google Open Source Blog: Open sourcing Science Journal iOS. “Google’s Science Journal app enables you to use the sensors in your mobile devices to perform science experiments. We believe anyone can be a scientist anywhere. Science doesn’t just happen in the classroom or lab—tools like Science Journal let you see how the world works with just your phone. From learning about sound and motion to discovering how atmospheric pressure works, Science Journal helps you understand and measure the world around you. We’re extremely excited to announce that we’re open sourcing this powerful science tool.”

NiemanLab: The New York Times has released an open-source tool to let you manage all your internal knowledge more easily

NiemanLab: The New York Times has released an open-source tool to let you manage all your internal knowledge more easily. “The means for creating (and maintaining) a documentation site — or a style guide, or a knowledge base, or any other set of information frequently used as a reference — have shifted back and forth over time. Blogging software! Wikis! Flat files! Database-driven! Google Docs! GitHub Pages! Dropbox Paper! Notion! The number of options — and the degree to which their selection sometimes come down to one person’s aesthetic choice or workflow preference — has left the job of keeping updated documentation a bit of a mess. Into this muddle steps The New York Times, which faced the same set of questions and built an internal tool called Library to address them. “

Google Blog: Introducing Season of Docs

Google Blog: Introducing Season of Docs. “Google Open Source is delighted to announce Season of Docs, a new program which fosters the open source contributions of technical writers. Season of Docs brings technical writers and open source projects together for a few months to work on open source documentation. 2019 is the first time we’re running this exciting new program.”

EurekAlert: An all-in-one cyber toolkit for criminal investigations

EurekAlert: An all-in-one cyber toolkit for criminal investigations . “FileTSAR is available free to law enforcement. The project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. The Purdue toolkit brings together in one complete package the top open source investigative tools used by digital forensic law enforcement teams at the local, state, national and global levels.”

calc.exe is now open source; there’s surprising depth in its ancient code (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: calc.exe is now open source; there’s surprising depth in its ancient code. “Microsoft’s embrace and adoption of open source software has continued with the surprising decision to publish the code for Windows Calculator and release it on GitHub under the permissive MIT license.”