Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system (South China Morning Post)

South China Morning Post: Tech war: Chinese database software vendor shrugs off sanctions risk on using open-source code from Oracle’s MySQL system. “A Chinese software vendor has brushed aside speculation that its enterprise product, which uses code from Oracle Corp’s MySQL open-source relational database management system, faces the risk of sanctions amid simmering tensions between Washington and Beijing.”

University of Missouri: MU professor says Google v. Oracle case leaves fair use ‘muddy’

University of Missouri: MU professor says Google v. Oracle case leaves fair use ‘muddy’. “After more than a decade of litigation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2021 that Google did not violate copyright laws by including 11,500 lines of code from Java (which is owned by Oracle) in its own Android operating system. It was the first time the court updated fair use precedents since 1994 and one of the few cases specifically addressing how these laws intersect with software development. Now, new research from Gary Myers, Earl F. Nelson Professor of Law at the University of Missouri School of Law, is urging another look at the consequences of the Supreme Court’s decision. He said the ruling could introduce uncertainty when deciding how new software can build on what came before.”

WIRED: The TikTok-Oracle Deal Would Set 2 Dangerous Precedents

WIRED: The TikTok-Oracle Deal Would Set 2 Dangerous Precedents. “The main concern US politicians have raised about TikTok is that because it’s owned by the China’s ByteDance, the Chinese government could conceivably access any American data held by the company. The other big concern has been security risk. This deal would address both. Under the agreement, Oracle would store TikTok data for US users, ensure that data is not transferred to ByteDance, and be responsible for protecting user data from cybersecurity threats.”

JD Supra: Supreme Court Finds Google’s Copying of Oracle’s APIs a Fair Use

JD Supra: Supreme Court Finds Google’s Copying of Oracle’s APIs a Fair Use. “A recent Supreme Court decision has finally put an end to the longstanding fight between Oracle and Google concerning Google’s use of Oracle’s copyrighted Java Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). The Supreme Court’s decision held that, contrary to the decision by the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals which was discussed in our previous alert, Google’s use of Oracle’s APIs was protected by the copyright defense of Fair Use. This decision is likely to create greater opportunities for developers to use copyrighted API code.” The Google/Oracle conflict has been going on for a long time and if you weren’t paying attention back in 2008, you might find yourself a bit in the weeds. This is a good overview/explainer.

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software

CNBC: Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software. “The Supreme Court on Monday sided with Google against Oracle in a long-running copyright dispute over the software used in Android, the mobile operating system. The court’s decision was 6-2. Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who was not yet confirmed by the Senate when the case was argued in October, did not participate in the case.”

BNN Bloomberg: Oracle’s Hidden Hand Is Behind the Google Antitrust Lawsuits

BNN Bloomberg: Oracle’s Hidden Hand Is Behind the Google Antitrust Lawsuits. “With great fanfare last week, 44 attorneys general hit Google with two antitrust complaints, following a landmark lawsuit the Justice Department and 11 states lodged against the Alphabet Inc. unit in October. What’s less known is that Oracle Corp. spent years working behind the scenes to convince regulators and law enforcement agencies in Washington, more than 30 states, the European Union, Australia and at least three other countries to rein in Google’s huge search-and-advertising business. Those efforts are paying off.”

Reuters: Tech companies tied to U.S. lawsuit against Google get more time to propose protective order

Reuters: Tech companies tied to U.S. lawsuit against Google get more time to propose protective order. ” Microsoft Corp…Oracle Corp…and other companies that have provided information to the U.S. government for its antitrust lawsuit against Alphabet’s Google… were granted more time on Wednesday to propose a protective order for their confidential data.”

Supreme Court takes on Google vs. Oracle: The biggest software development case ever (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Supreme Court takes on Google vs. Oracle: The biggest software development case ever. “Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic and other issues, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) will finally hold oral arguments in Google v. Oracle on Oct. 7, 2020. This case will decide, without exaggeration, the future of software development and billions of dollars.”

TechCrunch: The TikTok deal solves quite literally nothing

TechCrunch: The TikTok deal solves quite literally nothing . “After debasing the idea of free commerce in the U.S in the name of a misplaced security concern, stringing along several multi-billion dollar companies that embarrassed themselves in the interest of naked greed, and demanding that the U.S. government get a cut of the profits, the TikTok saga we’ve been watching the past few weeks finally appears to be over. A flurry of announcement late Saturday night indicate that the TikTok deal was actually a politically-oriented shakedown to boost the cloud infrastructure business of key supporters of the President of the United States.”

CNN: Trump says he has approved a deal for purchase of TikTok

CNN: Trump says he has approved a deal for purchase of TikTok. “President Donald Trump said Saturday he has approved a deal between TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, and Oracle (ORCL), temporarily averting a ban on TikTok in US app stores. The Commerce Department confirmed in a statement Saturday evening that it would delay — by one week — restrictions that were originally to take effect on Sunday.”

Deutsche Welle: ByteDance to pursue partnership with Oracle to avoid US sale of TikTok

Deutsche Welle: ByteDance to pursue partnership with Oracle to avoid US sale of TikTok. “Chinese tech company ByteDance will seek a partnership deal with US tech company Oracle Corp, sources familiar with the negotiations said Monday, hoping for a workaround that will avoid a forced sale of TikTok in the US. Instead of the expected buyout of the video-sharing app’s US operations, the latest proposal would see Oracle become ByteDance’s tech partner, taking over management of TikTok’s US user data and storing it in Oracle’s cloud servers.”

The Verge: As Google heads to the Supreme Court, Oracle takes aim at its industry allies

The Verge: As Google heads to the Supreme Court, Oracle takes aim at its industry allies. “For almost 10 years, Google and Oracle have been fighting over a set of Android APIs, and for almost that long, conventional wisdom has been that the tech industry is on Google’s side. But as the case moves to the Supreme Court for the second time, Oracle is taking aim at that idea — and calling out Google’s allies one by one.”

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight

ZDNet: Google garners support from tech industry in Supreme Court API copyright fight. “Submitting a joint ‘friend of the court’ brief on Monday — a legal document that offers information that has a bearing on the issues of a court case — Mozilla, Medium, Cloudera, Reddit, along with others, have pleaded for SCOTUS to reverse the Federal Court’s decision and allow for APIs to continue to be free from copyright, or at least be available for fair use.”

Ars Technica: Oracle copied Amazon’s API—was that copyright infringement?

Ars Technica: Oracle copied Amazon’s API—was that copyright infringement?. “Early this year, the Supreme Court will hear an important case that will determine the legal status of application programming interfaces under copyright law. If the high court sides with Oracle in its multibillion-dollar lawsuit against Google’s Android platform, it could stifle competition and entrench dominant technology firms—possibly including Google itself.”