Google LatLong: Street View goes to the “top of the world”

Google LatLong: Street View goes to the “top of the world”. “Here at Parks Canada, we have a lot to say about Quttinirpaaq National Park. We could tell you it’s the northernmost park in Canada, or that it lies roughly 500 miles (800 kilometers) from the North Pole. We could tell you it’s home to 4000-year-old archeologist sites or that it’s the second-largest national park in the country. But, we don’t need to tell you anymore. Now we can show you, with our new Street View collection.”

Philly Voice: Philly becomes first U.S. city to map urban trails on Google Street View

Philly Voice: Philly becomes first U.S. city to map urban trails on Google Street View. “After a yearlong process covering more than 400 miles, Philadelphia is officially the first city in the United States to have its urban trail system mapped on Google Street View, the Fairmount Park Conservancy and Parks & Recreation announced Wednesday.”

University of California Santa Barbara: Nature Stories

University of California Santa Barbara: Nature Stories “Scientists and historians alike are reaping scholarly dividends from a massive effort to collect, describe and archive land-use records and historical materials of all kinds from across the University of California Natural Reserve System (NRS). Seeking to inform the future by preserving the past, the NRS History & Archive Project is the brainchild of UC Santa Barbara environmental historian Peter Alagona…. The big goal of the ongoing project is to inventory, preserve and promote the use of documents and other materials related to the history of the NRS and the 39 sites — 750,000 acres in total — that it encompasses throughout California.”

San Francisco Gate: Saving historic American Indian trail trees

An old article, but the resource is new-to-me: Saving historic American Indian trail trees. “The pecan tree, more than 300 years old, stands out from the others in a forested area of Dallas, a 25-foot segment of its trunk slightly bowed and running almost parallel to the ground before jutting high into the sky. It, like numerous others across the country known as Indian marker trees or trail trees, was bent in its youth by American Indians to indicate such things as a trail or a low-water creek crossing.”

Bay Nature: Identify Anything, Anywhere, Instantly (Well, Almost) With the Newest iNaturalist Release

Bay Nature: Identify Anything, Anywhere, Instantly (Well, Almost) With the Newest iNaturalist Release. “A new version of the California Academy of Sciences’ iNaturalist app uses artificial intelligence to offer immediate identifications for photos of any kind of wildlife. You can observe anywhere and ask the computer anything. I’ve been using it for a few weeks now and it seems like it mostly works. It is completely astonishing. One iNaturalist user compared it to getting your hands on a real-life Star Trek tricorder.”

Public Technology: Ordnance Survey releases database of every green space in England, Scotland, and Wales

Public Technology: Ordnance Survey releases database of every green space in England, Scotland, and Wales. “Ordnance Survey (OS) has created a database and a digital map of every green space and outdoor recreation facility in England, Scotland, and Wales. The organisation has created ‘comprehensive map of Great Britain’s green spaces’ which can be accessed via its OS Maps app and online service. “

Alabama Launches New Site for Canoe Trails (PRESS RELEASE)

Just discovered South Carolina’s new Web site for its water trails and now learn that Alabama has a site for its canoe trails (PRESS RELEASE). “The Alabama State Lands Canoe Trails website showcases more than 170 miles of trail located along the Bartram Canoe Trail in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta and the Perdido River Canoe Trail, allowing paddlers the opportunity to explore the state’s unique natural resources with more ease than ever. The Bartram Canoe Trail offers the option of camping on floating platforms and pile-supported camp shelters or primitive land-based sites with trail access starting from the 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center or at one of many local landings; the Perdido River Canoe Trail offers land-based shelters and allows for primitive camping at several sandbars.”