Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam

Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam. “The U.S. federal court system rakes in about $145 million annually to grant access to records that, by all rights, belong to the public. For such an exorbitant price—it can cost hundreds of dollars a year to keep up with an ongoing criminal case—you might think the courts would at least make it easy to access basic documents. But you’d be wrong. The millions of dollars the courts have reaped in user fees have produced a website unworthy of the least talented of Silicon Valley garage programmers; 18 years since its online birth, PACER remains a byzantine and antiquated online repository of legal information.”

Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam

Politico: The Federal Courts Are Running An Online Scam. “…I’m here to tell you that PACER—Public Access to Court Electronic Records—is a judicially approved scam. The very name is misleading: Limiting the public’s access by charging hefty fees, it has been a scam since it was launched and, barring significant structural changes, will be a scam forever.”

Courthouse News Service: Bill Would Make Online Access to Federal Court Records Free

Courthouse News Service: Bill Would Make Online Access to Federal Court Records Free (YAY!) “House lawmakers introduced a bipartisan bill Wednesday that would remove online paywalls and make federal court records free to the public. PACER, as the Public Access to Court Electronic Records system is otherwise known, currently charges between 10 cents and $3 for most searches, page views and PDF document downloads.”

New York Times: Attacking a Pay Wall That Hides Public Court Filings

New York Times: Attacking a Pay Wall That Hides Public Court Filings. ” The federal judiciary has built an imposing pay wall around its court filings, charging a preposterous 10 cents a page for electronic access to what are meant to be public records. A pending lawsuit could help tear that wall down.”

Free Law Project: Uploading PACER Dockets and Oral Argument Recordings to the Internet Archive

Free Law Project: Uploading PACER Dockets and Oral Argument Recordings to the Internet Archive. “Part of our mission at Free Law Project is to share this information and to ensure its long-term distribution and preservation. A great way to do that is to give it to a neutral third party so that no matter what happens, the information will always be available. For years, we have been lucky to partner with the Internet Archive for this purpose and today we are pleased to share two pieces of news about how we give them information.”

Free Law Project: Announcing PACER Docket Alerts for Journalists, Lawyers, Researchers, and the Public

Free Law Project: Announcing PACER Docket Alerts for Journalists, Lawyers, Researchers, and the Public. “Today we are thrilled to announce the general availability of PACER Docket Alerts on CourtListener.com. Once enabled, a docket alert will send you an email whenever there is a new filing in a case in PACER.”

Los Angeles Times: Judge orders L.A. Times to alter story about Glendale cop, sparking protest from newspaper

Los Angeles Times: Judge orders L.A. Times to alter story about Glendale cop, sparking protest from newspaper. “A federal judge on Saturday ordered the Los Angeles Times to remove information from an article that described a plea agreement between prosecutors and a Glendale police detective accused of working with the Mexican Mafia, a move the newspaper decried as highly unusual and unconstitutional. The agreement was supposed to have been filed under seal, but it was mistakenly made available on PACER, a public online database for federal court documents.”