Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI

Fast Company: These portraits were painted to confuse facial recognition AI. “How do you have to distort a face so that facial recognition algorithms no longer see a face–and evade the technology that has become so pervasive in our world? That was the question the Seoul-based artistic duo Shin Seung Back and Kim Yong Hun posed to a group of 10 different painters. The result is their series Nonfacial Portrait, a striking collection of painted portraits that evade the algorithms.”

Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Barefaced cheek: Rubens nudes fall foul of Facebook censors. “Rubens nudes have entranced those visiting the world’s great art galleries for some 400 years. Contemporaries on whom the Flemish master is said to have had a profound impact include Van Dyck and Rembrandt … but none of this has passed muster with Facebook’s censors.”

Galway Daily: Amazing new database with pics of 18th and 19th Century Ireland launched

Galway Daily: Amazing new database with pics of 18th and 19th Century Ireland launched. “How was Ireland depicted in illustrations produced by travellers from 1680 to 1860? A new database of images drawn from travel accounts answers this question. Based on years of research by a group of investigators at NUI Galway led by Professor Jane Conroy, Ireland Illustrated is now available to view online.”

Radio Praha: National Gallery’s App Reveals Hidden Medieval Secrets

Radio Praha: National Gallery’s App Reveals Hidden Medieval Secrets. “The National Gallery in Prague has launched its first mobile application, called Hidden Secrets of Medieval Paintings. It offers visitors an interactive viewing of selected panel paintings, which are on display in the Convent of St. Agnes of Bohemia, and uncovers some interesting facts about their origin as well as some secrets hidden under the top layer.”

State of the art: Museum takes hi-tech look at Vermeer (Phys .org)

Phys.org: State of the art: Museum takes hi-tech look at Vermeer . “This really is state of the art research. Experts at the Mauritshuis museum in The Hague are using the latest technology to take a long, hard look at one of their most prized paintings, Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” and they are inviting the public in to watch. For two weeks starting Monday, experts are pointing a battery of high-tech machines at the 17th-century masterpiece of a young woman whose enigmatic gaze has earned her the nickname of the Dutch Mona Lisa.”

Amit Agarwal: How to Make Pixel Paintings with Google Spreadsheets

Useful for a given value of useful, but hey, weekend! From Amit Agarwal, who has just been fire this week: How to Make Pixel Paintings with Google Spreadsheets. “If you would like to create your own spreadsheet art but don’t have the time to carefully paint every cell manually, here’s a simple workaround for you. You can take any photograph, vector art, or any other image and use a Google Script to convert that bitmap image into spreadsheet art.”

New York Times: In Picasso’s Blue Period, Scanners Find Secrets He Painted Over

New York Times: In Picasso’s Blue Period, Scanners Find Secrets He Painted Over. “Bits of color were peeking out through cracks in the dark shades of ‘La Miséreuse accroupie,’ a 1902 painting by a young Pablo Picasso during his ‘Blue Period.’ That was not surprising. X-ray images taken a quarter- century ago had shown that Picasso had painted this work, known in English as ‘The Crouching Woman,’ over another artist’s landscape.”