Getty: Use Augmented Reality to Explore a Virtual Museum Gallery from Home

Getty: Use Augmented Reality to Explore a Virtual Museum Gallery from Home. “The Getty Museum is partnering with Google Arts & Culture to launch a new exhibition in Pocket Gallery, an immersive exhibition feature within the Google Arts & Culture app that uses augmented reality to open up a life-size virtual space that you can literally step inside using your smartphone…. Getty’s exhibition is called Better Together: Join the Crowd in Celebrated European Paintings, and is inspired by the social gatherings so many of us are missing during the pandemic. The exhibition features four virtual rooms to explore, and each room displays about seven to ten paintings around a theme: City Life, Music and Merriment, A Breath of Fresh Air, and Around the Table.”

Apollo Magazine: It’s deepfake karaoke, Old Master style

Apollo Magazine: It’s deepfake karaoke, Old Master style. “A new tool goes a step further than those AI animations of portrait paintings that have been doing the rounds: the recently launched Wombo.Ai app, which transforms still images into singing videos. By the end of last week, some 15 million Wombo videos had been created – among them, of course, some delightfully expressive footage of historical artworks serenading the internet.”

Google Blog: India’s mini-masterpieces brought to life with AI and AR

Google Blog: India’s mini-masterpieces brought to life with AI and AR. “Miniature paintings are among the most beautiful, most technically-advanced and most sophisticated art forms in Indian culture. Though compact (about the same size as a small book), they typically tackle profound themes such as love, power and faith. Using technologies like machine learning, augmented reality and high-definition robotic cameras, Google Arts & Culture has partnered with the National Museum in New Delhi to showcase these special works of art in a magical new way.”

Tufts Now: The Case of the Reappearing Art

Tufts Now: The Case of the Reappearing Art . “On the rolling plateau along the border between Turkey and Armenia stand the ruins of the Cathedral of Ani, a magnificent building constructed between 989 and 1001 AD, along with many other long-abandoned churches in Ani, which was once called the City of 1,001 churches. Now thousand-year-old paintings are coming to life again on the cathedral’s walls, thanks to Christina Maranci, Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Professor of Armenian Art and Architecture at Tufts.”

Google Blog: Portraits of healthcare heroes on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Portraits of healthcare heroes on Google Arts & Culture. “In March, the UK locked down the country to contain the spread of COVID-19. For many this led to a heightened period of dread and anxiety, but also creativity and heroism. During lockdown artist Tom Croft created #portraitsforNHSheroes to galvanize artists across the country to celebrate workers on the frontline. Tom collaborated with the charity Paintings in Hospitals to give the collection a more permanent home, as it closely aligns with the values and ethos of their mission to improve health through art. As a result of the collaboration, Google Arts & Culture created an online exhibition of over 700 contemporary portraits that were submitted as part of Tom’s #portraitsforNHSheroes initiative.”

CNET: See Rembrandt’s The Night Watch in ‘hyper resolution’ as 44.8-gigapixel photo

CNET, from mid-May (still catching up): See Rembrandt’s The Night Watch in ‘hyper resolution’ as 44.8-gigapixel photo. “A museum in the Netherlands has published the largest, most detailed photograph ever of Rembrandt’s famed 1642 painting The Night Watch, making it possible for anyone to zoom in on the masterpiece in exquisite detail…. It’s 44.8 gigapixels (44,804,687,500 pixels) and made up of 528 exposures divided into 24 rows of 22 pictures stitched together with the help of neural networks.”

Forbes: New Art Scanning Method Offers 3-D Image Of Painting’s Brush Strokes

Forbes: New Art Scanning Method Offers 3-D Image Of Painting’s Brush Strokes . “As tempting as it may be, you can’t touch a painting in a museum. And now that many museums are closed, you’re even further from seeing the close-up detail in brush strokes that can tell you so much about how the art was created. But now, a collaboration between artists and researchers at Penn State and the New Jersey Institute of Technology have come closer to developing a method that makes it possible to scan a sizeable section of a painting and turn it into a 3-D model that maintains the fine brush stroke pattern details.”

Inverse: A.I. Gahaku Turns Your Selfie Into An Oil Painting Masterwork

Inverse: A.I. Gahaku Turns Your Selfie Into An Oil Painting Masterwork. “Ready for your close-up? AI Gahaku is an online A.I. tool that’s going viral, promising to produce impressive selfies that make you look like an oil painting. The service promises to take images and apply one of 10 different styles, complete with museum description that makes the work seem ideal for the next gallery exhibition.”

KCUR: All Of Missouri Painter George Caleb Bingham’s Work Will Soon Be Free To The World Online

KCUR: All Of Missouri Painter George Caleb Bingham’s Work Will Soon Be Free To The World Online. “Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham shaped the way the nation saw life on the frontier. His work spanned politics, civil war discord and rowdy riverboatmen, and his genre paintings of 19th century river life are in many major national art collections. Within the next three years, all of Bingham’s nearly 600 known paintings will be accessible online and freely available to the public.”

Ars Technica: How AI helps unlock the secrets of Old Master and modernist paintings

Ars Technica: How AI helps unlock the secrets of Old Master and modernist paintings . “X-rays are a well-established tool to help analyze and restore valuable paintings because the rays’ higher frequency means they pass right through paintings without harming them. X-ray imaging can reveal anything that has been painted over a canvas or where the artist may have altered his (or her) original vision. But the technique has its limitations, and that’s where machine learning can prove useful. Two papers this fall illustrated the use of AI to solve specific problems in art analysis and conservation: one to reconstruct an underpainting in greater detail, and the other to make it easier to image two-sided painted panels.”

Buddhistdoor: Freer and Sackler Galleries Launch Digital Catalogue of Goryeo Buddhist Art

Buddhistdoor: Freer and Sackler Galleries Launch Digital Catalogue of Goryeo Buddhist Art. “South Korea’s Cultural Heritage Administration and the US-based Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery have launched a new website titled Goryeo Buddhist Painting: A Closer Look, showcasing Buddhist art from Korea’s Goryeo dynasty. The new online catalogue serves as a digital repository for all Goryeo-era art currently held in the collections of museums in the United States.”

New York Times: Art Disappears in Private Hands. Can Social Media Resurface It?

New York Times: Art Disappears in Private Hands. Can Social Media Resurface It . “Collecteurs, based out of the New Museum’s NEW INC., a cultural incubator, is a public benefit corporation with a stated mission to bring artwork into the light — at least, the light of the internet. Its founders are Jessica and Evrim Oralkan, married collectors who became overwhelmed by the size of their own trove of art. They were struggling to manage it, and share it with the public.”

Islamic Painted Page: Growing a Database (Asian and African Studies Blog)

New-to-me and recently updated, from the Asian and African Studies Blog: Islamic Painted Page: Growing a Database. “Since its launch in 2013, Islamic Painted Page (IPP) has grown into a major online database of Islamicate arts of the book, with over 42,000 references to paintings, illuminations and bindings from over 270 collections around the globe – of which the British Library is one of the most important…. The website enables users to search by picture description, collection, accession number, date, place of origin, manuscript title or author, or publication – or any combination of these.”

Mona Lisa frown: Machine learning brings old paintings and photos to life (TechCrunch)

TechCrunch: Mona Lisa frown: Machine learning brings old paintings and photos to life. “Machine learning researchers have produced a system that can recreate lifelike motion from just a single frame of a person’s face, opening up the possibility of animating not just photos but also paintings. It’s not perfect, but when it works, it is — like much AI work these days — eerie and fascinating.”