Washington Post: United States is ‘out of the pandemic phase,’ Fauci says

Washington Post: United States is ‘out of the pandemic phase,’ Fauci says. “While infections are still spreading — with an average of over 50,000 new cases per day as of Tuesday — the country is far from the peaks of the pandemic, when daily counts surpassed 1 million. Restrictions, too, are easing as many Americans appear to be putting the pandemic behind them. Masking requirements have been lifted across most of the country, and officials stopped enforcing a federal mask mandate in transportation settings after a judge struck down the requirement.”

New York Times: Is This What Endemic Disease Looks Like?

New York Times: Is This What Endemic Disease Looks Like?. “For months, some American and European leaders have foretold that the coronavirus pandemic would soon become endemic. Covid-19 would resolve into a disease that we learn to live with. According to several governors, it nearly has. But we are still in the acute phase of the pandemic, and what endemic Covid might look like remains a mystery. Endemic diseases can take many forms, and we do not know yet where this two-year-old disease will fall among them.”

The Conversation: A computer science technique could help gauge when the pandemic is ‘over’

The Conversation: A computer science technique could help gauge when the pandemic is ‘over’. “In early 2022, nearly two years after Covid was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, experts are mulling a big question: when is a pandemic ‘over’? So, what’s the answer? What criteria should be used to determine the ‘end’ of Covid’s pandemic phase? These are deceptively simple questions and there are no easy answers.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian Collects COVID-19 Artifacts in Pandemic’s Second Year

Smithsonian: Smithsonian Collects COVID-19 Artifacts in Pandemic’s Second Year. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History continues to document how communities and individuals across the U.S. have coped with the health and safety challenges of a global pandemic, protested hate crimes, raised funds for charity and reimagined work, culture and education. As the nation enters the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic and with a death toll nearing 1 million, the museum has added numerous artifacts to its collections, responded to more than 500 donation offers and is conducting several oral history projects, including one focused on the Latina/o COVID-19 experience in New York City and another on educational equity and digital access in Washington, D.C.”

Associated Press: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed after two years?

Associated Press: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed after two years?. “More countries are shifting toward a return to normal and learning to live with the virus. Safe, effective vaccines have been developed and there’s better understanding of how to treat people sickened by the virus. Two years after the pandemic began, questions remain about the coronavirus. But experts know a lot more about how to keep it under control.”

Associated Press: How will pandemic end? Omicron clouds forecasts for endgame

Associated Press: How will pandemic end? Omicron clouds forecasts for endgame . “Pandemics do eventually end, even if omicron is complicating the question of when this one will. But it won’t be like flipping a light switch: The world will have to learn to coexist with a virus that’s not going away. The ultra-contagious omicron mutant is pushing cases to all-time highs and causing chaos as an exhausted world struggles, again, to stem the spread. But this time, we’re not starting from scratch.”

Wired: The Pandemic Might Have Redesigned Cities Forever

Wired: The Pandemic Might Have Redesigned Cities Forever. “IT WAS EASY to find tragedy in the second year of the Covid-19 pandemic. Vaccines became widely available and proved to be remarkably effective at keeping people out of hospitals, but some people wouldn’t get their shots—mostly Republicans. Broader uptake of vaccines could have averted 163,000 deaths between June and November alone. That’s tragedy. But you could find hope in 2021, too. It was literally in the air. The virus—and specifically the understanding that as an aerosol it spread more easily in poorly ventilated spaces—changed something fundamental about urban life.”

‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022 (WBNS)

WBNS: ‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022. “Over 2020 and 2021, we’ve seen the pattern of waves. When cases increase, we see the number of hospitalizations go up as well. Unfortunately, when there’s an increase in hospitalizations, the number of deaths has gone up. Eventually the waves peak, crest, and the numbers decrease again. With omicron, we are going to see more cases. However, as more people get vaccines and boosters, will that be enough to ease the hospitalizations and deaths?”

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients . “A University of Winnipeg researcher is developing an online research tool to help Indigenous communities and families find missing tuberculosis patients who were sent to Manitoba hospitals and sanatoriums but never came home. Anne Lindsay is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Winnipeg and will be working with the university’s Manitoba Indigenous Tuberculosis History Project on the initiative.”

New York Times: How Does This End?

New York Times: How Does This End?. “Among the Covid experts I regularly talk with, Dr. Robert Wachter is one of the more cautious. He worries about ‘long Covid,’ and he believes that many people should receive booster shots. He says that he may wear a mask in supermarkets and on airplanes for the rest of his life. Yet Wachter — the chair of the medicine department at the University of California, San Francisco — also worries about the downsides of organizing our lives around Covid. In recent weeks, he has begun to think about when most of life’s rhythms should start returning to normal. Increasingly, he believes the answer is: Now.”

CNN: Global Covid-19 cases surpass 250 million

CNN: Global Covid-19 cases surpass 250 million. “More than 250 million cases of Covid-19 have been reported globally, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. This grim milestone comes about a year and eight months since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic in March 2020. The first 50 million cases were reported over the first eight months — a full year ago, on November 7, 2020 — and there have been about 50 million new cases reported about every three months since then.”

Associated Press: COVID-19′s global death toll tops 5 million in under 2 years

Associated Press: COVID-19′s global death toll tops 5 million in under 2 years. “The global death toll from COVID-19 topped 5 million on Monday, less than two years into a crisis that has not only devastated poor countries but also humbled wealthy ones with first-rate health care systems. Together, the United States, the European Union, Britain and Brazil — all upper-middle- or high-income countries — account for one-eighth of the world’s population but nearly half of all reported deaths. The U.S. alone has recorded over 745,000 lives lost, more than any other nation.”

Poynter: Why does the delta variant seem to rise and decline in two-month waves?

Poynter: Why does the delta variant seem to rise and decline in two-month waves?. “Let’s not bury the lead: Many of the important indicators about the pandemic are positive. The number of new cases, hospitalizations and even deaths are declining in most places. But this post is about what we are learning about this virus. As everyone suspected, the delta variant acted in the United States similar to how it acted in other countries — with two and a half months of increase then a steep decline.”