Associated Press: How will pandemic end? Omicron clouds forecasts for endgame

Associated Press: How will pandemic end? Omicron clouds forecasts for endgame . “Pandemics do eventually end, even if omicron is complicating the question of when this one will. But it won’t be like flipping a light switch: The world will have to learn to coexist with a virus that’s not going away. The ultra-contagious omicron mutant is pushing cases to all-time highs and causing chaos as an exhausted world struggles, again, to stem the spread. But this time, we’re not starting from scratch.”

Wired: The Pandemic Might Have Redesigned Cities Forever

Wired: The Pandemic Might Have Redesigned Cities Forever. “IT WAS EASY to find tragedy in the second year of the Covid-19 pandemic. Vaccines became widely available and proved to be remarkably effective at keeping people out of hospitals, but some people wouldn’t get their shots—mostly Republicans. Broader uptake of vaccines could have averted 163,000 deaths between June and November alone. That’s tragedy. But you could find hope in 2021, too. It was literally in the air. The virus—and specifically the understanding that as an aerosol it spread more easily in poorly ventilated spaces—changed something fundamental about urban life.”

‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022 (WBNS)

WBNS: ‘Decoupling’: The COVID-19 trend doctors hope to see in 2022. “Over 2020 and 2021, we’ve seen the pattern of waves. When cases increase, we see the number of hospitalizations go up as well. Unfortunately, when there’s an increase in hospitalizations, the number of deaths has gone up. Eventually the waves peak, crest, and the numbers decrease again. With omicron, we are going to see more cases. However, as more people get vaccines and boosters, will that be enough to ease the hospitalizations and deaths?”

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients . “A University of Winnipeg researcher is developing an online research tool to help Indigenous communities and families find missing tuberculosis patients who were sent to Manitoba hospitals and sanatoriums but never came home. Anne Lindsay is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Winnipeg and will be working with the university’s Manitoba Indigenous Tuberculosis History Project on the initiative.”

New York Times: How Does This End?

New York Times: How Does This End?. “Among the Covid experts I regularly talk with, Dr. Robert Wachter is one of the more cautious. He worries about ‘long Covid,’ and he believes that many people should receive booster shots. He says that he may wear a mask in supermarkets and on airplanes for the rest of his life. Yet Wachter — the chair of the medicine department at the University of California, San Francisco — also worries about the downsides of organizing our lives around Covid. In recent weeks, he has begun to think about when most of life’s rhythms should start returning to normal. Increasingly, he believes the answer is: Now.”

CNN: Global Covid-19 cases surpass 250 million

CNN: Global Covid-19 cases surpass 250 million. “More than 250 million cases of Covid-19 have been reported globally, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. This grim milestone comes about a year and eight months since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic in March 2020. The first 50 million cases were reported over the first eight months — a full year ago, on November 7, 2020 — and there have been about 50 million new cases reported about every three months since then.”

Associated Press: COVID-19′s global death toll tops 5 million in under 2 years

Associated Press: COVID-19′s global death toll tops 5 million in under 2 years. “The global death toll from COVID-19 topped 5 million on Monday, less than two years into a crisis that has not only devastated poor countries but also humbled wealthy ones with first-rate health care systems. Together, the United States, the European Union, Britain and Brazil — all upper-middle- or high-income countries — account for one-eighth of the world’s population but nearly half of all reported deaths. The U.S. alone has recorded over 745,000 lives lost, more than any other nation.”

Poynter: Why does the delta variant seem to rise and decline in two-month waves?

Poynter: Why does the delta variant seem to rise and decline in two-month waves?. “Let’s not bury the lead: Many of the important indicators about the pandemic are positive. The number of new cases, hospitalizations and even deaths are declining in most places. But this post is about what we are learning about this virus. As everyone suspected, the delta variant acted in the United States similar to how it acted in other countries — with two and a half months of increase then a steep decline.”

Washington Post: The covid endgame: Is the pandemic over already? Or are there years to go?

Washington Post: The covid endgame: Is the pandemic over already? Or are there years to go?. “Innumerable predictions over the course of the pandemic have come up lame. Some scientists have sworn off soothsaying. But as they learn more about the coronavirus that bestowed covid-19 on mankind, they build models and make projections and describe the hurdles that remain before people can pull off the masks and go about their lives. The good news is there is some fuel for optimism.”

Route Fifty: The Coronavirus Is Here Forever. This Is How We Live With It.

Route Fifty: The Coronavirus Is Here Forever. This Is How We Live With It.. “Endemicity as the COVID-19 endgame seems quite clear, but how we get there is less so. In part, that is because the path depends on us. As my colleague Ed Yong has written, the eventuality of endemic COVID-19 does not mean we should drop all precautions. The more we can flatten the curve now, the less hospitals will become overwhelmed and the more time we buy to vaccinate the unvaccinated, including children. Letting the virus rip through unvaccinated people may get us to endemicity quickest, but it will also kill the most people along the way.”

CNN: As the government talks about vaccine boosters, it’s time to cover the endemic reality of Covid

CNN: As the government talks about vaccine boosters, it’s time to cover the endemic reality of Covid. “As US government officials prepare to brief the public about Covid-19 vaccine booster shots, there is an emerging consensus coming from influential corners of the national news media: people should anticipate that Covid-19 is here to stay. It’s time to adjust expectations accordingly.”

The Register: Scientists reckon eliminating COVID-19 will be easier than polio, harder than smallpox – just buckle in for a wait

The Register: Scientists reckon eliminating COVID-19 will be easier than polio, harder than smallpox – just buckle in for a wait. “In what is good news to everyone except possibly the most introverted masochists out there, boffins have decided that it is possible to rid the earth of COVID. In fact, it’s probably easier to do than polio, but harder than smallpox, said researchers in the online journal BMJ Global Health. The team of New Zealand public health physicians, epidemiologists, and catastrophic risk researchers compared polio, smallpox, and COVID-19 on technical, sociopolitical, and economic factors.”

AP: Old records shed new light on smallpox outbreaks in 1700s

AP: Old records shed new light on smallpox outbreaks in 1700s. “A highly contagious disease originating far from America’s shores triggers deadly outbreaks that spread rapidly, infecting the masses. Shots are available, but a divided public agonizes over getting jabbed. Sound familiar? Newly digitized records — including a minister’s diary scanned and posted online by Boston’s Congregational Library and Archives — are shedding fresh light on devastating outbreaks of smallpox that hit the city in the 1700s.”