The Atlantic: Raising a Social-Media Star

The Atlantic: Raising a Social-Media Star. “When then-14-year-old Jonas Bridges ran down the stairs of his Atlanta home shouting, ‘Dad, I’ve got 1,000 fans!’ his father, Rob Bridges, hardly took notice. A few days later Jonas barreled into the living room again, saying, ‘Dad, I’ve got 3,000 fans now.’ Again, his father brushed him off. Several days later, Jonas told his father, ‘I have 5,000 fans now and if I get to 10,000 I’ll get paid for it.’ Finally, Rob Bridges turned to his wife and said, ‘Denise, what the hell is he talking about?'”

The Times: Children link self-worth to ‘likes’ on social media

The Times: Children link self-worth to ‘likes’ on social media. “Eleven-year-old children are starting secondary school desperate for validation through social media ‘likes’ and comments, research has found. Children whose parents share pictures or videos of them online are often left embarrassed but feel unable to ask that they are removed. The practice, known as ‘sharenting’, has been found to make younger children self-conscious and worried that images posted by their parents would cause them to be laughed at by peers.”

Lifehacker: How to Teach Your Kids to Spot Fake News

Lifehacker: How to Teach Your Kids to Spot Fake News. “How to teach kids to spot fake news? First: Teach everyone to spot fake news. When I was a child, my parents had access to only a few news sources: our local paper, the big-city dailies (for us, the Washington Post and the New York Times) and the nightly news. Kids today have … the entire internet, with every crackpot theory and faked moon landing right at their fingertips. Even the distinction between ‘media’ and ‘journalism’ has blurred to the point that many adults don’t know if anyone can be trusted at all.”

Meridian Star: Mississippi health department launches online database

Meridian Star: Mississippi health department launches online database . “The Mississippi State Department of Health has launched an online database of the more than 1,500 statewide licensed child care facilities. The database includes the facilities’ licensing status, inspection reports, complaint investigations, and monetary penalties assigned during routine visits or inspections.”

Quartz: Facebook debuts Messenger Kids, an ad-free app that gives parents control

Quartz: Facebook debuts Messenger Kids, an ad-free app that gives parents control. “Technically, children under the age of 13 aren’t allowed on Facebook. But many kids manage to sign up for Facebook and Instagram quite easily, making them vulnerable to all of the internet’s dangers. Now Facebook is rolling out a platform that will allow children to use one of its services—with plenty of parental supervision. Opening up a massive new pool of users, the company is introducing Messenger Kids, a standalone app that lets kids communicate with their family and friends.”

Sorry kid, access denied: Our favorite, free parental control software (Digital Trends)

Digital Trends: Sorry kid, access denied: Our favorite, free parental control software. “Most kids these days are well versed in the tech-savvy art of computing. Many of us wouldn’t mind a little assistance when it comes to curtailing cyberbullying, blocking inappropriate websites, or simply limiting our childrens’ computer usage — for many, it now hovers around eight hours a day. Thankfully, there is plenty of free parental control software available to help.”

Salon: A parent’s ultimate guide to YouTube kids

Salon: A parent’s ultimate guide to YouTube kids. “So many kids love watching videos on YouTube, it seemed like a slam dunk for Google to create a special app specifically for the online video service’s youngest fans. And while YouTube Kids offers a colorful, easy-to-navigate environment, a wide range of high-quality videos, a few parental controls, and fun features for kids, it’s been dogged by concerns over its advertising, branded content, and inappropriate clips slipping through the curation process. So is YouTube Kids right for kids — or not?”