Vanderbilt University: Vanderbilt researchers develop app that promotes shared responsibility between parents and teens to manage family online safety and privacy

Vanderbilt University: Vanderbilt researchers develop app that promotes shared responsibility between parents and teens to manage family online safety and privacy. “…Vanderbilt researchers, with collaborators from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte and the University of Cincinnati, developed a mobile app—Community Oversight of Privacy and Security (‘CO-oPS’)—and tested it with parents and teenagers to see whether working collaboratively would help resolve some of the tech-centered disputes while enhancing the safety and privacy of all family members.

PR Newswire: California Child Care Resource & Referral Network Launches MyChildCarePlan.org to Help Families Find Child Care (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: California Child Care Resource & Referral Network Launches MyChildCarePlan.org to Help Families Find Child Care (PRESS RELEASE). “Using the site’s search tool, parents and families are able to learn what child care providers are in their neighborhood, which have space and availability, their approaches to care, languages spoken, experience in meeting medical and special needs, and more. Data is collected through state records and by local child care specialists, meaning the information on the site is reliable, unbiased, and free to use for both parents and providers.”

Cornell Chronicle: App for the pre-K set promotes healthy eating, exercise

Cornell Chronicle: App for the pre-K set promotes healthy eating, exercise. “Preschoolers can be notoriously picky eaters – and that’s if you can get one to sit still for a meal. A series of free, evidence-informed apps for preschool-aged children, developed by a Cornell researcher and colleagues, aims to encourage healthy eating behaviors and exercise. A majority of parents said the apps helped their children try new foods and raise their activity level, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior on date.”

CNET: The Bizarre Way Kids Use Memes Is Melting My Brain

CNET: The Bizarre Way Kids Use Memes Is Melting My Brain. “Much like the olden days, where urban legends spread from older sibling to savvy younger brother and beyond, children are constantly proliferating preexisting memes utterly divorced from the context of their origins. They’re consumed by osmosis, via a family member or YouTube streamer, then rapidly co-opted. Quickly they become part of a bizarre shared language. Nonsensical words that are simply shouted on the playground yet make no literal sense.”

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Teach Children How to Use the Internet Safely, for Kids and Parents

MakeUseOf: 5 Sites to Teach Children How to Use the Internet Safely, for Kids and Parents. “These websites offer different ways for children, parents, and educators to learn best digital practices and good online behavior. They address basics like security, privacy, and even behavioral patterns like cyberbullying through online games, interactive storytelling, quizzes, and detailed guides.”

New York Times: A Dad Took Photos of His Naked Toddler for the Doctor. Google Flagged Him as a Criminal.

New York Times: A Dad Took Photos of His Naked Toddler for the Doctor. Google Flagged Him as a Criminal.. “Because technology companies routinely capture so much data, they have been pressured to act as sentinels, examining what passes through their servers to detect and prevent criminal behavior. Child advocates say the companies’ cooperation is essential to combat the rampant online spread of sexual abuse imagery. But it can entail peering into private archives, such as digital photo albums — an intrusion users may not expect — that has cast innocent behavior in a sinister light in at least two cases The Times has unearthed.”

Unboxing videos on YouTube: What parents need to watch for (Brigham Young University)

Brigham Young University: Unboxing videos on YouTube: What parents need to watch for. “Videos of a child influencer opening a toy and demonstrating how to play with it have become wildly popular on YouTube, many garnering tens of millions of views from children around the globe. In fact, Walmart has a line of toys based on the reviews of a prominent kid YouTuber, Ryan Kaji of Ryan’s World. Unbeknownst to child viewers, however, is the fact that many of the toys shown in unboxing videos are paid for or provided by a brand, with the goal of influencing children.”

CNN: ‘Watchdog moms’ on TikTok are trying to keep minors safe

CNN: ‘Watchdog moms’ on TikTok are trying to keep minors safe. “Seara Adair, a mother of two young daughters from Atlanta, revealed in a TikTok video last year that she was sexually abused by a family member as a child. In the next few weeks, her follower count grew by tens of thousands, many of whom appeared to be minors. After that, she started using the popular short-form video app to educate her followers about various digital dangers. She posted about the risks of being approached by strangers online and the problematic content found hidden in the deep corners of TikTok and other platforms.”

Birthing a Capstone: A Prenatal and Postpartum Health Toolkit for Public Librarians (National Library of Medicine)

National Library of Medicine: Birthing a Capstone: A Prenatal and Postpartum Health Toolkit for Public Librarians. “Using PubMed and MedlinePlus as well as curating more online resources, this new toolkit gives librarians a ready-made, customizable bank of resources so that they can distribute pre-prepared resources or customize our resources templates to suit their specific library’s needs and ensures that librarians have access to high-quality, evidence-based information about prenatal, expecting, and postpartum needs to distribute to patrons, with the option to tailor it to suit their patrons’ needs.”

NBC News: Parents accuse online sellers of price gouging on baby formula

NBC News: Parents accuse online sellers of price gouging on baby formula. “Parents struggling to find baby formula amid a nationwide shortage are reporting that price gougers are selling bottles and cans marked up by as much as 300 percent or more on websites like eBay, OfferUp, Amazon and Craigslist, and inside Facebook communities. But in many cases, they’re finding that the platforms are doing little to punish the predatory sellers.”