Tampa Bay Times: Florida launches school security database with student discipline, health, social media info

Tampa Bay Times: Florida launches school security database with student discipline, health, social media info . “The Florida Department of Education rolled out its database of student information, called the Florida Schools Safety Portal, late Thursday, designed to enhance school security in the wake of last year’s shooting in Parkland.”

People: Parkland Dad Gathers ‘Incomplete’ Items Left Behind by Victims to Show Devastation of Gun Violence

People: Parkland Dad Gathers ‘Incomplete’ Items Left Behind by Victims to Show Devastation of Gun Violence. “The sneaker is the starting point for the story Manny Oliver wants to tell about the joyous, interrupted life of his 17-year-old son, and the lives of too many others that were abruptly ended by gun violence.”

Education Week: Florida Plan for a Huge Database to Stop School Shootings Hits Delays, Legal Questions

Education Week: Florida Plan for a Huge Database to Stop School Shootings Hits Delays, Legal Questions. “It was supposed to be operational six months ago, part of Florida’s wide-ranging effort to prevent the next school shooting: a sprawling new database that would merge people’s social media posts with millions of records on individuals who have been bullied, placed in foster care, committed a crime, or even been mentioned in unverified tips made to law enforcement. The plan, however, has sputtered, an Education Week investigation found.”

‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America. “…as the project’s new website explains, more than 200 teen journalists across the country last summer began researching and writing the life stories of young Americans — from newborns to 18-year-olds — who were killed during a year in this country. Their stories start on Feb. 14, 2018, the day a gunman walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and killed 17 people, 14 of them students. Those young people were not the only ones to die in America from guns that day.”

A Grim Task: Preserving Mementos From the Florida Shooting (US News and World Report)

US News and World Report: A Grim Task: Preserving Mementos From the Florida Shooting. “Under the unforgiving Florida sun, the stuffed animals along the makeshift memorial are beginning to fade. The prayer candles have melted, and the roses have withered. Now it’s time to collect, archive and preserve the mementos that honor the 17 students and faculty who were killed Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The grim assignment falls to Parkland city historian Jeff Schwartz, who has already heard from people associated with other mass shootings, telling him to collect the items with ‘some degree of speed.'”

Washington Post: We studied thousands of anonymous posts about the Parkland attack — and found a conspiracy in the making

Washington Post: We studied thousands of anonymous posts about the Parkland attack — and found a conspiracy in the making. “Forty-seven minutes after news broke of a high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., the posters on the anonymous chat board 8chan had devised a plan to bend the public narrative to their own designs: ‘Start looking for [Jewish] numerology and crisis actors.’ The voices from this dark corner of the Internet quickly coalesced around a plan of attack: Use details gleaned from news reports and other sources to push false information about one of America’s deadliest school shootings.”

Slate: YouTube Is Struggling to Deal With the Conspiracy Theory Videos That Flood the Site

Slate: YouTube Is Struggling to Deal With the Conspiracy Theory Videos That Flood the Site. “It’s an ugly game of whack-a-mole, and YouTube seems to be losing. On Sunday, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, Jonathan Albright, published a Medium post about the videos that come up if you search YouTube for ‘crisis actor.’ His analysis generated nearly 9,000 videos. The vast majority of the video ‘titles … are a mixture of shocking, vile and promotional,’ Albright wrote in his report. ‘Themes include rape game jokes, shock reality social experiments, celebrity pedophilia, “false flag” rants, and terror-related conspiracy theories dating back to the Oklahoma City attack in 1995.'”