The Verge: LastPass is going to become an independent company

The Verge: LastPass is going to become an independent company. “LogMeIn plans to spin out password management tool LastPass as a standalone company, it announced Tuesday. With the change, LastPass is promising that customers will receive enhancements on an ‘accelerated timeline’ next year. ‘With a team solely dedicated to its continued innovation and growth, [LastPass] will be able to deliver even more strongly for users,’ a spokesperson said.”

CNET: Mozilla will end support for Firefox Lockwise app

CNET: Mozilla will end support for Firefox Lockwise app. “Mozilla will end support for its Firefox Lockwise password management app this year, the company said in a post on its site. The app, currently available on iOS and Android, will no longer be available to install or reinstall starting Dec. 13. That means iOS version 1.8.1 and Android version 4.0.3 will be the app’s last releases.” It looks like Firefox still supports password management – they’re just getting rid of the app.

The Register: Kaspersky Password Manager’s random password generator was about as random as your wall clock

The Register: Kaspersky Password Manager’s random password generator was about as random as your wall clock . “In March 2019, security biz Kaspersky Lab shipped an update to [Kaspersky Password Manager], promising that the application could identify weak passwords and generate strong replacements. Three months later, a team from security consultancy Donjon found that KPM didn’t manage either task particularly well – the software used a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) that was insufficiently random to create strong passwords. From that time until the last few months of 2020, KPM was suggesting passwords that could be easily cracked, without flagging the weak passwords for users.”

LastPass vs. 1Password: Which password manager wins? (Tom’s Guide)

Tom’s Guide: LastPass vs. 1Password: Which password manager wins?. “LastPass does have a leg up with its free tier, which has all the basic functionality you could want, although it recently limited syncing across all device types (computers, smartphones and tablets) to its premium plan. However, 1Password’s user experience on Apple devices and its plans to improve the design across platforms put it in close proximity to other competitors. So which should you get? Let this LastPass vs. 1Password faceoff help you decide.”

Wired: How to Export Your Passwords From LastPass

Wired: How to Export Your Passwords From LastPass. “There are several other password services we think are better than LastPass, and one of them is also free. If you’d like to switch, have a look at our updated Guide to the Best Password Managers. Once you’ve decided where you want to take your passwords, you will need to export your data out of LastPass and import it into the new service.”

Ars Technica: Demand for fee to use password app LastPass sparks backlash

Ars Technica: Demand for fee to use password app LastPass sparks backlash. “Two investment firms, Elliott Management and Francisco Partners, acquired the service as part of their $4.3 billion buyout of Internet software group LogMeIn in September last year. Now, the app is warning users that they must pay as much as $36 a year if they want access to those cumbersome passwords on all their devices. Those who refuse to pay will have to choose between synching only to their desktop computers, or only to mobile devices such as phones.”

Ubergizmo: How To Create A QR Code For Your WiFi Password

Ubergizmo: How To Create A QR Code For Your WiFi Password. “We’re sure that many of us have had that experience when your friends or family members come to your home and ask for the WiFi password. Maybe you use this password for other things and you’d rather not give it outright, or maybe you’re tired of having to repeat it over and over again. Thankfully, there is a quicker way of giving your guests access to your home’s WiFi and that is by generating a QR code.”

The Verge: The best free password manager

The Verge: The best free password manager. “There are many good password managers available that charge a monthly fee, but for this guide we’re going to be focusing on free services. All of them have paid subscription tiers, but for most, the free tier offers the essential core features of a password manager.”

Mashable: 5 password managers to replace LastPass

Mashable: 5 password managers to replace LastPass. “According to The Verge, LastPass’s free version will only allow users to view their passwords from one type of device, either mobile or computer, starting March 16. On that date, users will have to choose their device category, which they will be able to switch only three times, or upgrade to Premium at $3/month. Since I do actually want to make my life easier and more secure (and yours, too!): I’ve gathered the best free and paid alternatives to LastPass.”

Best password managers: Reviews of the top products (PC World)

PC World: Best password managers: Reviews of the top products. “…password managers vary widely in their capabilities and cost, so we compared several of the most popular. All support Windows Mac OS, Android, and iOS, as well as the major browsers. And all will let you sync your data across multiple devices, though you may have pay extra for the privilege. Here are our top two picks, followed by tips on what to look for when shopping for a password manager and links to full reviews of all the products.”

BetaNews: The best password managers 2021

BetaNews: The best password managers 2021. “Using unique passwords is essential for keeping documents, data and accounts safe. However, it can be hard to remember them all. Using password managers is the ideal solution for keeping everything organized. Now that the new year is nearly upon us, it’s time to take a look at the best password managers for 2021.”

Neowin: Google is making password management and payments easier in Chrome

Neowin: Google is making password management and payments easier in Chrome. “Google is making it easier for users to use and save credentials on their Google accounts in Chrome, even if they choose not to use Chrome’s sync service. The company has announced new features making their way to Android and desktop versions of the browser that let users access information on their Google account more easily.”