CNET: As college football kicks off, avoid putting your favorite team in your password

CNET: As college football kicks off, avoid putting your favorite team in your password. “The research published by Specops Software, a Stockholm-based security company, shows that the names, nicknames and mascots of Division 1 football schools are among the most popular choices for passwords within a trove of 800 million compromised logins it analyzed. Nearly one in 10 entries used a college football team reference, according to the report, which focused exclusively on the top college teams.”

Make Tech Easier: The Best Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) Apps That Sync With Multiple Devices

Make Tech Easier: The Best Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) Apps That Sync With Multiple Devices. “If you’re conscious about your online security, two-factor authentication (2FA) should be on your radar. For the unaware, it’s a better way to validate your identity when you log in to a website than just a single password. It will provide a one-time code that you’ll enter into a dedicated field which authenticates your other credentials. In this post, we look at some 2FA apps that sync across devices, to let you log in wherever you are.”

The Register: Kaspersky Password Manager’s random password generator was about as random as your wall clock

The Register: Kaspersky Password Manager’s random password generator was about as random as your wall clock . “In March 2019, security biz Kaspersky Lab shipped an update to [Kaspersky Password Manager], promising that the application could identify weak passwords and generate strong replacements. Three months later, a team from security consultancy Donjon found that KPM didn’t manage either task particularly well – the software used a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) that was insufficiently random to create strong passwords. From that time until the last few months of 2020, KPM was suggesting passwords that could be easily cracked, without flagging the weak passwords for users.”

The Next Web: Have I Been Pwned goes open-source and teams up with the FBI on leaked passwords

The Next Web: Have I Been Pwned goes open-source and teams up with the FBI on leaked passwords. “[Troy] Hunt, also Microsoft Regional Director for security, announced last night that he’s making the website open-sourced so others can contribute to the project and make it easier to find your compromised credentials. He had first announced his intention of making this project available to other services last August.”

LastPass vs. 1Password: Which password manager wins? (Tom’s Guide)

Tom’s Guide: LastPass vs. 1Password: Which password manager wins?. “LastPass does have a leg up with its free tier, which has all the basic functionality you could want, although it recently limited syncing across all device types (computers, smartphones and tablets) to its premium plan. However, 1Password’s user experience on Apple devices and its plans to improve the design across platforms put it in close proximity to other competitors. So which should you get? Let this LastPass vs. 1Password faceoff help you decide.”

TechRadar: Google will soon make two-factor authentication mandatory

TechRadar: Google will soon make two-factor authentication mandatory. “One of the best ways to protect your online accounts is to have a second form of verification in place as this allows them to confirm that it is really you trying to log in. Google has been doing this for years by asking users to enroll in two-step verification (2SV) to confirm it’s really them by tapping on a prompt on their smartphone whenever they sign in. However, soon the company will begin automatically enrolling users in 2SV if their accounts are properly configured.”

Wired: How to Export Your Passwords From LastPass

Wired: How to Export Your Passwords From LastPass. “There are several other password services we think are better than LastPass, and one of them is also free. If you’d like to switch, have a look at our updated Guide to the Best Password Managers. Once you’ve decided where you want to take your passwords, you will need to export your data out of LastPass and import it into the new service.”

Ars Technica: Demand for fee to use password app LastPass sparks backlash

Ars Technica: Demand for fee to use password app LastPass sparks backlash. “Two investment firms, Elliott Management and Francisco Partners, acquired the service as part of their $4.3 billion buyout of Internet software group LogMeIn in September last year. Now, the app is warning users that they must pay as much as $36 a year if they want access to those cumbersome passwords on all their devices. Those who refuse to pay will have to choose between synching only to their desktop computers, or only to mobile devices such as phones.”

The Verge: The best free password manager

The Verge: The best free password manager. “There are many good password managers available that charge a monthly fee, but for this guide we’re going to be focusing on free services. All of them have paid subscription tiers, but for most, the free tier offers the essential core features of a password manager.”

PC World: How to create strong, secure passwords by learning how to crack them

PC World: How to create strong, secure passwords by learning how to crack them. “Create stronger, more secure passwords: We are nagged to do it all the time, but few of us actually make the effort. Meanwhile, passwords continue to be stolen, leaked, and cracked on a regular basis. So this time we’re hoping to get your attention by looking at it from the attacker’s side! We’ll show you how passwords are cracked and even how to do it yourself, so you can see exactly why a strong password matters.” If you just want some hints on good strong passwords, skip this article. If you want a deep, informative dive on passwords and security– enjoy.

Mashable: 5 password managers to replace LastPass

Mashable: 5 password managers to replace LastPass. “According to The Verge, LastPass’s free version will only allow users to view their passwords from one type of device, either mobile or computer, starting March 16. On that date, users will have to choose their device category, which they will be able to switch only three times, or upgrade to Premium at $3/month. Since I do actually want to make my life easier and more secure (and yours, too!): I’ve gathered the best free and paid alternatives to LastPass.”