Microsoft: we’ve got your back, Linux, here are 60,000 patents to protect you (Neowin)

Neowin: Microsoft: we’ve got your back, Linux, here are 60,000 patents to protect you . “Microsoft loves Linux. And it really wants to prove it. In lieu of a wedding ring, the company has decided to show its dedication to open-source software by joining the Open Innovation Network (OIN), a community designed to protect Linux and other open-source software from legal liability. As part of its grand gesture, the company is also planning on making 60,000 of its patents public, and making them available to the OIN.”

AG-IP News: WIPO and IFPMA Launch New Online Patent-Search Resource to Help Health Agencies Procure Medicines

AG-IP News: WIPO and IFPMA Launch New Online Patent-Search Resource to Help Health Agencies Procure Medicines. “WIPO and the research-based pharmaceutical industry launched a new online tool designed to help procurement agencies better understand the global patent status of medicines. The Patent Information Initiative for Medicines (Pat-INFORMED) is a unique resource where patent holders provide information about patents covering approved medicines through a free, open access database.” WIPO is the World Intellectual Property Organization, while IFPMA is the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Associations.

Google Blog: Coming together to create a prior art archive

Google Blog: Coming together to create a prior art archive. “A healthy patent system requires that patent applicants and examiners be able to find and access the best documentation of state-of-the-art technology. This documentation is often found in sources other than patents. Non-patent literature can be particularly hard to find and access in the software field, where it may take the form of user manuals, technical specifications, or product marketing materials. Without access to this information, patent offices may issue patents covering existing technology, or not recognize trivial extensions of published research, removing the public’s right to use it and bringing the reliability of patent rights into question. To address this problem, academia and industry have worked together to launch the Prior Art Archive, created through a collaboration between the MIT Media Lab, Cisco and the USPTO, and hosted by MIT. The Prior Art Archive is a new, open access system that allows anyone to upload those hard-to-find technical materials and make them easily searchable by everyone.”

BIP Patent Attorneys: Searching for Patents on Indian Patent Database (InPASS)

New-to-Me, from BIP Patent Attorneys: Searching for Patents on Indian Patent Database (InPASS). “I recall a time when searching for Indian patents and applications online was almost impossible. Performing a search to identify relevant prior art would mean perusal of each and every weekly gazette published by the Indian patent office. These gazettes, being poorly scanned copies of the bibliographic data, would make patent searching a task in itself and let us not even begin to discuss the patience that was tested. It was a time when even the popular paid databases failed to provide comprehensive data on Indian patents. Today, however, performing a patent search for Indian patents has become fairly easier thanks to InPass, Indian patent advanced search system.”

Go Zuck Yourself: Facebook destroys patent suit over timeline (The Register)

The Register: Go Zuck Yourself: Facebook destroys patent suit over timeline . “Facebook has prevailed in a suit over its iconic news feed and claims it ripped off the idea from a patent troll. Judge John Koetl granted Summary Judgement [PDF] to House Zuck, approving its motion to dismiss an allegation that the Facebook timeline violated Mirror Worlds’ purchased patents on the organization of messages and news items.”

The Next Web: Inside Google’s plan to stalk your social media accounts

The Next Web: Inside Google’s plan to stalk your social media accounts. “Google, once again, is excited about social media. But not in the ways you might think; this isn’t about another in a failed string of chat apps, or the knockout success that never was in Google Plus. Instead, it’s an entirely new way of recognizing human faces, and one made possible by — you guessed it — creeping on your social media profiles.”

Ars Technica: Facebook patent would turn your mic on to analyze how you watch ads

Ars Technica: Facebook patent would turn your mic on to analyze how you watch ads. “As Facebook tries to get ahead of public pressure about what the service does and doesn’t track about its users, a patent application has emerged which would enable something that the service’s detractors have long theorized and feared: silently triggered microphones that keep tabs on Facebook users.”