Reclaim the Net: Patreon deplatforms censored video archive altCensored for “hate speech”

Reclaim the Net: Patreon deplatforms censored video archive altCensored for “hate speech”. “altCensored, a platform that archives videos that have been censored or limited by YouTube, has been booted by the fan-funding platform Patreon for ‘hate speech.’ The platform has received around 500,000 unique monthly visitors over the last year, according to estimates based on web analytics company SimilarWeb and altCensored’s server logs.” Platforms like altCensored do important work. YouTube content removal often leads to unintended consequences like removing evidence of war crimes.

Rolling Stone: Patreon Claimed They Kicked Conspiracy Theorists Off. QAnon Still Flourishes

Rolling Stone: Patreon Claimed They Kicked Conspiracy Theorists Off. QAnon Still Flourishes. “Both aspiring and well-established QAnon influencers are directly profiting off the paid subscription service platform Patreon, despite the website publicly cracking down on accounts pushing the conspiracy theory last winter. Rolling Stone found nearly a dozen examples of creators on the platform using language that identifies them as followers of QAnon, the far-right extremist conspiracy theory baselessly positing, among other things, that President Trump will arrest and execute a cadre of left-wing political figures who are secretly pedophiles.”

Daily Dot: On Patreon, QAnon believers are turning conspiracy into cash

Daily Dot: On Patreon, QAnon believers are turning conspiracy into cash. “QAnon followers have found a home on Patreon, one that is more hospitable and profitable than other social media platforms. Patreon is a fundraising platform where donors, or patrons, sign up to give a specific amount every month to access exclusive content. While Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube work to limit the spread, Patreon essentially accepts the conspiracy theorists with open arms. There some are making thousands of dollars every month.”

The Verge: Patreon’s CEO is launching a $50,000 annual grant for creators

The Verge: Patreon’s CEO is launching a $50,000 annual grant for creators. “Patreon CEO and co-founder Jack Conte touts his crowdfunding platform (as Patreon describes it, ‘membership’ platform) as a place where ‘creators get paid’ instead of being subject to the whims of advertisers or recommendation algorithms. Today, Conte is announcing a much more individual attempt to fund creators that’s not formally related to Patreon but fits squarely into its vision for how artists work today.”

Variety: Patreon May Start Providing Loans to Creators, Among Other New Services

Variety: Patreon May Start Providing Loans to Creators, Among Other New Services. “Patreon, the subscription-based fan platform, is eyeing a range of new services to support creators — including potentially providing loans at some point, CEO Jack Conte said. Conte, speaking at Variety’s Entertainment & Technology Summit in L.A., said Patreon is considering ways to provide capital funding and other financial services to artists, as well as services like health insurance and HR support.”

TechCrunch: Patreon’s new fees are surprisingly low

TechCrunch: Patreon’s new fees are surprisingly low . “Patreon announced today that it was creating multiple pricing tiers for its membership service, with varying levels of features offered depending on price. The company will now offer a ‘Lite’ offering that charges a 5% commission, a ‘Pro’ offering at 8%, and a ‘Premium’ option at 12%, with discounted rates for existing founders.”

TechCrunch: Facebook wants up to 30% of fan subscriptions vs Patreon’s 5%

TechCrunch: Facebook wants up to 30% of fan subscriptions vs Patreon’s 5%. “Facebook will drive a hard bargain with influencers and artists judging by the terms of service for the social network’s Patreon-like Fan Subscriptions feature that lets people pay a monthly fee for access to a creator’s exclusive content. The policy document attained by TechCrunch shows Facebook plans to take up to a 30 percent cut of subscription revenue minus fees, compared to 5 percent by Patreon, 30 percent by YouTube, which covers fees and 50 percent by Twitch.” OF COURSE IT DOES.

The Art Newspaper: New York’s Postmasters gallery, in survival move, solicits pledges via Patreon

The Art Newspaper: New York’s Postmasters gallery, in survival move, solicits pledges via Patreon. “New York’s Postmasters Gallery has turned to Patreon, the crowdfunding site where members pledge a set amount of money per month to support all types of creative endeavours, from podcasts to comics to music, to help cover its operating expenses and keep the business going.”

The Verge: Facebook is rolling out Patreon-style subscriptions for a small group of creators

The Verge: Facebook is rolling out Patreon-style subscriptions for a small group of creators. “Facebook is investing in its creator community in an attempt to get them to make content for the social network. The company announced multiple new creator features today, including the ability for fans to support creators with monthly payments. Fans will receive exclusive content as a reward, as well as a new badge that shows their support. Top fans can also display the badge based on how often they comment, share, react, or watch a creator’s content, but they have to opt-in to this experience.” The timing of this is… not great.

Vintage Vinyl News: The Estate of John Denver Starts Patreon Page to Give Fans Rare Content

Vintage Vinyl News: The Estate of John Denver Starts Patreon Page to Give Fans Rare Content. From the Patreon announcement included in the article: “Patreon is a Membership platform that makes it easy for creators to offer exclusive content to their fans in exchange for a small monthly pledge. We’ve decided to build a ‘virtual museum’ of John’s work on Patreon so that his most dedicated fans can get access to his personal photographs, previously unreleased recordings, and other special content. The collection will be carefully curated and new content will be released each month. Patreon also serves as a community space, where fans can comment and share their experiences around John’s music and art. “

Washington Post: Facing a rebellion of furious creators, Patreon backs away from a new fee

Washington Post: Facing a rebellion of furious creators, Patreon backs away from a new fee. “Creators, and by extension, their fans, tend to have an uneasy relationship with the companies on which their businesses depend. And for good reason: A slight tweak to a YouTube algorithm or advertising policy can have a dramatic impact on the income of someone’s channel. They might sympathize with fans who turn on the platform, but they still need those fans to stick with them to make money. The thing is, Patreon has benefited in the past from a reputation as one of the relatively good guys among those companies.” Patreon did something else earlier this year that made me uneasy, so the fee change isn’t the only thing that’s been bothering me about them. I’m looking into other options; keep an eye out for an article early next week.

MIT Technology Review: Patreon Introduces Tools to Let Anyone with a Website Put Up a Paywall

MIT Technology Review: Patreon Introduces Tools to Let Anyone with a Website Put Up a Paywall. “Fans can now sign up on an artist’s website to make recurring contributions, and creators can restrict content pages to be available to paying supporters only. This is effectively allowing easy paywall implementation on any WordPress site. Other plug-ins will allow for direct support of artists through MailChimp-powered newsletters, Patreon exclusive Discord voice and chat servers, and Patreon-only live-streaming through Crowdcast.”

The Verge: Inside Patreon, The Economic Engine Of Internet Culture

The Verge: Inside Patreon, The Economic Engine Of Internet Culture. “Patreon isn’t simply a replacement for record labels or TV networks, though. Instead it’s the ideal incubator for niche internet subcultures, where a small but dedicated group of fans can directly support work they care about. That includes traditional arts and entertainment, but also YouTube celebrities, cultural figures, or even political actions — some inspiring, some troubling. The Patreon model encourages people to see themselves not as consumers, but as members of a private club, free from the constraints of mainstream gatekeepers or mass-market appeal. And in the process, it’s blurred the lines between art, artist, and audience in an unprecedented way.” I am on Patreon, as you may know, and I very much appreciate your support.

Mashable: Patreon wants to grow up with a new look, big-name artists, and its own Snapchat ripoff

Mashable: Patreon wants to grow up with a new look, big-name artists, and its own Snapchat ripoff. “Patreon has fed a hotbed of homemade art and bootstrap media. Now it’s looking to get more professional. The crowdfunding platform launched a sleek brand overhaul and a host of new creator tools on Wednesday in a bid to cast itself as a serious business builder for scrappy bedroom artists and established entertainers alike.”

Please Help Brian Fritz and the OMDb API

There’s a Web site called the OMDb API, at http://www.omdbapi.com/ , and it’s run by a guy called Brian Fritz. His Web site is an invaluable way to easily get information on movies and import it into Google Spreadsheets or manipulate it some other way. He’s a small operation and recently has been having problems keeping his server up. If you want to help a small operation, please consider supporting him on his Patreon page. His goal is modest; $450 a month keeps his servers going. If there’s any interest I can write an article about how to use his site’s API with Google Spreadsheets. Thank you. DISCLAIMER: Mr. Fritz doesn’t know me. He didn’t ask for this. I’m a long-time fan of his site.