Wired: A Brief History of Instagram’s Trouble With ‘Weight-Loss Tea’

Wired: A Brief History of Instagram’s Trouble With ‘Weight-Loss Tea’. “Do you want a lithe, toned body that absolutely does not take multiple photo-editing apps to achieve? Do you want to be a person whose hair and makeup look red-carpet-ready immediately after leaving the gym? Do you want to eat only photogenic smoothie bowls and be utterly unfazed by the fact that they are cold yogurt soup? Try this tea! The 30-Day Detox Starter Pack is now only $85—just use my promo code below. Oh, by the way: #ad.”

Washington Post: Article or ad? Teen Vogue removes glowing Facebook story without explanation.

Washington Post: Article or ad? Teen Vogue removes glowing Facebook story without explanation.. “The laudatory article carried a lofty headline, praising Facebook for fighting misinformation ahead of the 2020 presidential election. One of the tech giant’s executives, Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, liked it so much, she posted it to her own page, calling it ‘great.’ But the ‘article,’ published online Wednesday by Teen Vogue, appeared without a byline and read more like a 2,000-word news release than a piece of journalism, prompting some to ask whether Facebook had paid to place it.”

BBC: Social media stars agree to declare when they post ads

BBC: Social media stars agree to declare when they post ads. “Sixteen social media stars including singers Ellie Goulding and Rita Ora, models Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Alexa Chung, and vlogger Zoella have agreed to change how they post online. They will have to clearly state if they have been paid or received any gifts or loans of products they endorse.”

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals

New York Times: Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals. “One of the world’s top breast cancer doctors failed to disclose millions of dollars in payments from drug and health care companies in recent years, omitting his financial ties from dozens of research articles in prestigious publications like The New England Journal of Medicine and The Lancet.”

BuzzFeed: Inside The Ecosystem That Fuels Amazon’s Fake Review Problem

BuzzFeed: Inside The Ecosystem That Fuels Amazon’s Fake Review Problem . “One morning in late January, Jake picked up the box on his desk, tore through the packing tape, unearthed the iPhone case inside, snapped a picture, and uploaded it to an Amazon review he’d been writing. The review included a sentence about the case’s sleek design and cool, clear volume buttons. He finished off the blurb with a glowing title (‘The perfect case!!’) and rated the product a perfect five stars. Click. Submitted. Jake never tried the case. He doesn’t even have an iPhone.”

National Law Journal: FTC’s First Action Against a Social Media ‘Influencer’ Might Not Be Last

National Law Journal: FTC’s First Action Against a Social Media ‘Influencer’ Might Not Be Last. “This week, the FTC brought its first enforcement action against an influencer—and took the opportunity to issue new guidance for disclosing the business relationships behind promotional social media posts. The FTC targeted Trevor ‘TmarTn’ Martin and Thomas ‘Syndicate’ Cassell, co-owners of the online gambling service CSGO Lotto, who allegedly endorsed the company without disclosing their joint ownership of it. According to the FTC, Martin and Cassell enjoy wide followings in the online gaming community and paid other well-known influencers thousands of dollars to promote their online gambling service on YouTube, Twitter and Facebook without requiring them to disclose the business deals behind the posts.”

CNBC: Google has been paying academic researchers who write favorable papers, report says

? From CNBC: Google has been paying academic researchers who write favorable papers, report says. “Google has paid researchers and academics who have worked on projects that support the company’s positions in battles with regulators, a report in The Wall Street Journal said on Tuesday. Google’s practice might not sound all that different from lobbying, but The Wall Street Journal revealed that some of the professors, including a Paul Heald from the University of Illinois, didn’t disclose Google’s payments.”