Android Police: Google Photos ‘color pop’ feature will remain free, upgraded version in testing for Google One subscribers

Android Police: Google Photos ‘color pop’ feature will remain free, upgraded version in testing for Google One subscribers. “Google told Engadget in a statement that only an upgraded version of color pop will require a Google One subscription, not the existing functionality that is already available.”

Engadget: Google Photos adds paid color pop editing feature

Engadget: Google Photos adds paid color pop editing feature. “The next time you dive into Google Photos’ editing suite, you may notice some tools locked behind a paywall. As part of an ongoing rollout, Google is adding a new take on its color pop feature that users can apply to any photo, not just ones that include depth information. The catch is you’ll need to subscribe to Google One before you can tweak your photos with the new color pop.”

PC World: Google Meet extends unlimited meetings until March, possibly without a key feature

PC World: Google Meet extends unlimited meetings until March, possibly without a key feature. “Google said Tuesday that it would extend the period during which customers could make unlimited calls using Google Meet until March 31, 2021, ending speculation that it would end the free period on September 30. While that might be good news for those who use Meet casually to keep in touch with friends and family, one feature seems to have disappeared: the ability to record and archive Meet calls to Google Drive, which Google had offered for free as part of its original offer.”

Warning: The free version of Google Meet will enforce time limits soon (Mashable)

Mashable: Warning: The free version of Google Meet will enforce time limits soon . “The free version of Google Meet has been a godsend for some people during the COVID-19 pandemic, but all that’s golden is never real. Google released a free version of its business-focused video call app earlier this year, which allowed for more people in a call than Hangouts, its other video chat app.”

Humanities Commons: Passenger Pigeon Manifesto

Humanities Commons: Passenger Pigeon Manifesto. “Even though most of our tangible cultural heritage has not been digitised yet, a process greatly hindered by the lack of resources for professionals, we could already have much to look at online. In reality, a significant portion of already digitised historical photos is not available freely to the public – despite being in the public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium sized previews scattered throughout numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct. The knowledge and efforts of these institutions are crucial in tending our cultural landscape but they cannot become prisons to our history. Instead of claiming ownership, their task is to provide unrestricted access and free use. Cultural heritage should not be accessible only for those who can afford paying for it.”

Current Affairs: The Truth Is Paywalled But The Lies Are Free

Current Affairs: The Truth Is Paywalled But The Lies Are Free. “You want ‘Portland Protesters Burn Bibles, American Flags In The Streets,’ ‘The Moral Case Against Mask Mandates And Other COVID Restrictions,’ or an article suggesting the National Institutes of Health has admitted 5G phones cause coronavirus—they’re yours. You want the detailed Times reports on neo-Nazis infiltrating German institutions, the reasons contact tracing is failing in U.S. states, or the Trump administration’s undercutting of the USPS’s effectiveness—well, if you’ve clicked around the website a bit you’ll run straight into the paywall. This doesn’t mean the paywall shouldn’t be there. But it does mean that it costs time and money to access a lot of true and important information, while a lot of bullshit is completely free.”

No paywall in the chicken coop: A fast-food chain is paying to take down 16 Canadian newspapers’ paywalls this month (Nieman Lab)

Nieman Lab: No paywall in the chicken coop: A fast-food chain is paying to take down 16 Canadian newspapers’ paywalls this month. “Canadians will be able to keep abreast of the latest news for the next month, thanks to a sponsorship from Mary Brown’s Chicken & Taters, home of the Tater Poutine. This thing could have legs.”

Google Doc: Publisher Access COVID-19

Google Doc: Publisher Access COVID-19. “More than 30 leading publishers have committed to making all of their COVID-19 and coronavirus-related publications, and the available data supporting them, immediately accessible in PubMed Central (PMC) and other public repositories. This will help to support the ongoing public health emergency response efforts. “

PR Newswire: Elsevier Gives Full Access to its Content on its COVID-19 Information Center for PubMed Central and Other Public Health Databases to Accelerate Fight Against Coronavirus (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Elsevier Gives Full Access to its Content on its COVID-19 Information Center for PubMed Central and Other Public Health Databases to Accelerate Fight Against Coronavirus (PRESS RELEASE). “In January, Elsevier created the COVID-19 Information Center with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus. The Information Center is updated daily with the latest research information on the virus and the disease and includes links to more than 19,500 freely available articles on ScienceDirect, Elsevier’s platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature. Since its launch, the Information Center has been visited by more than a quarter of a million scientists, researchers, clinicians and others, 15 percent of whom are in the US.”

Column: COVID-19 could kill the for-profit science publishing model. That would be a good thing (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Column: COVID-19 could kill the for-profit science publishing model. That would be a good thing. “Of all the ways the current coronavirus crisis has upended commonplace routines — such as disrupting global supply chains and forcing workers to stay at home — one of the most positive is how it demonstrates the value of open access to scientific research. Ferreting out a silver lining in an event that has produced the infection of more than 90,000 individuals and taken the lives of more than 3,000 — and is certain to wreak further destruction before it is quelled — is a delicate matter.”

The Scientist: Journals Open Access to Coronavirus Resources

The Scientist: Journals Open Access to Coronavirus Resources. “On January 31 this year, a day after the novel coronavirus was designated a public health emergency of global concern, 94 academic journals, societies, institutes, and companies signed a commitment to making research and data on the disease freely available, at least for the duration of the outbreak.”

Science: World’s largest linguistics database is getting too expensive for some researchers

Science: World’s largest linguistics database is getting too expensive for some researchers. “To help cover its nearly $1 million in annual operating costs, Ethnologue got its first paywall in late 2015; most nonpaying visitors were turned away after several pages. Since October 2019, the paywall has taken a new form: It lets visitors access every page, but it blots out information on how many speakers a language has and where they live. Subscriptions now start at $480 per person per year.”

‘It’s a Moral Imperative:’ Archivists Made a Directory of 5,000 Coronavirus Studies to Bypass Paywalls (Motherboard)

Motherboard: ‘It’s a Moral Imperative:’ Archivists Made a Directory of 5,000 Coronavirus Studies to Bypass Paywalls. “A group of online archivists have created an open-access directory of over 5,000 scientific studies about coronaviruses that anyone can browse and download without encountering a paywall.”

Reuters: China science database scraps paywall to aid virus battle

Reuters: China science database scraps paywall to aid virus battle. “A major scientific database run by China’s Tsinghua University has made its contents available free of charge from Wednesday in order to help researchers work from home, following a virus outbreak in the central city of Wuhan.”