PA Homepage: Finding the Hidden History of the Electric City

PA Homepage: Finding the Hidden History of the Electric City. “Glynis Johns spends a lot of time inside the Lackawanna Historical Society. She pours over maps — directories — and pretty much anything else that she can get her hands on to help explain the history of African Americans in the city of Scranton. Johns started in 2016 as part of a graduate research project.”

Pennsylvania: Wolf Administration Announces Comprehensive Tool to Help Individuals Identify Resources for Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Related Support Services

Pennsylvania: Wolf Administration Announces Comprehensive Tool to Help Individuals Identify Resources for Substance Use Disorder Treatment, Related Support Services. “The Wolf Administration today announced the launch of the Drug and Alcohol Referral Tool (DART), an online resource designed to help Pennsylvanians seeking substance use disorder treatment for themselves or a loved one find treatment options and other related services in their area. The tool is a centralized hub that consolidates available resources to assist people looking for services but are not sure where to begin.”

WHYY: A new one-stop-shop for Pennsylvania education data

WHYY: A new one-stop-shop for Pennsylvania education data. “If you’re looking for an education-related figure, number, data point, or variable, chances are the new Pennsylvania School Data Project has you covered. Conceived as a repository for researchers, journalists, policy wonks, and school administrators, the new website hosts more than a dozen spreadsheets packed with education data. The nonprofit Research for Action — known as RFA — spent more than six months collating federal, state, and local data to make the new databank.”

Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world

Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world. “‘If medieval manuscripts—which are historical documents, marks of lives well spent, and also consummate works of art—are going to reach their full potential in the 21st century, then they have to reach new audiences,’ says William Noel, director of Penn’s Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. The collaborative three-year project, Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis, or BiblioPhilly for short, will digitize 475 European medieval and early modern manuscripts, and additional individual pages from the collections of 15 universities and other Philadelphia-area institutions. The high-resolution images and accompanying analyses will be made available to the public, free of charge, on Penn Libraries’ OPenn database.”

The Inquirer: How the Hoagie Historian is fighting to save Philly’s beleaguered History Museum

The Inquirer: How the Hoagie Historian is fighting to save Philly’s beleaguered History Museum. “Howard [Robboy] lives in Delray Beach, Fla., now. He’s a regular at the only Philly bar within miles — the Hurricane, where on Sundays he watches Eagles games with his soft pretzels. Last week, he fired up his computer and dashed off a passionate email to Mayor Kenney: Howard’s beloved museum was shuttering, perhaps indefinitely, and someone had to stick up for it. Howard decided this job fell squarely on his 73-year-old shoulders. Besides being the place’s biggest booster, a letter from him packs a certain amount of clout. He has made a career out of chronicling our city’s ephemera. He’s published multiple papers on the history of the hoagie. Sample title: ‘The sociocultural context of an Italian American dietary item.'”

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online. “Cycling was immensely popular in the 1890’s, and Estoclet produced what seems to be a unique set of American narrative bike routes published in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The detailed routes and hand-drawn maps described and showed crossroads, geographic features, and towns in the surrounding area, as well as local gossip. This allowed readers and riders to follow along. The routes ran regularly from 1896 to 1898 as a column called ‘Trips Awheel: Where to Go and How to Get There,’ and then as part of a special travel insert, The Inquirer Roadster, sporadically for another few years. The routes for 1897 through 1898 have been transcribed and digitized by faculty and staff of Paul Robeson Library, Rutgers Camden, and are now available online. “