Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world

Penn Today: Penn brings Philadelphia’s rare manuscripts to the world. “‘If medieval manuscripts—which are historical documents, marks of lives well spent, and also consummate works of art—are going to reach their full potential in the 21st century, then they have to reach new audiences,’ says William Noel, director of Penn’s Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. The collaborative three-year project, Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis, or BiblioPhilly for short, will digitize 475 European medieval and early modern manuscripts, and additional individual pages from the collections of 15 universities and other Philadelphia-area institutions. The high-resolution images and accompanying analyses will be made available to the public, free of charge, on Penn Libraries’ OPenn database.”

The Inquirer: How the Hoagie Historian is fighting to save Philly’s beleaguered History Museum

The Inquirer: How the Hoagie Historian is fighting to save Philly’s beleaguered History Museum. “Howard [Robboy] lives in Delray Beach, Fla., now. He’s a regular at the only Philly bar within miles — the Hurricane, where on Sundays he watches Eagles games with his soft pretzels. Last week, he fired up his computer and dashed off a passionate email to Mayor Kenney: Howard’s beloved museum was shuttering, perhaps indefinitely, and someone had to stick up for it. Howard decided this job fell squarely on his 73-year-old shoulders. Besides being the place’s biggest booster, a letter from him packs a certain amount of clout. He has made a career out of chronicling our city’s ephemera. He’s published multiple papers on the history of the hoagie. Sample title: ‘The sociocultural context of an Italian American dietary item.'”

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online

Hidden City Philadelphia: Victorian-era Philly Bicycle Routes Now Available Online. “Cycling was immensely popular in the 1890’s, and Estoclet produced what seems to be a unique set of American narrative bike routes published in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The detailed routes and hand-drawn maps described and showed crossroads, geographic features, and towns in the surrounding area, as well as local gossip. This allowed readers and riders to follow along. The routes ran regularly from 1896 to 1898 as a column called ‘Trips Awheel: Where to Go and How to Get There,’ and then as part of a special travel insert, The Inquirer Roadster, sporadically for another few years. The routes for 1897 through 1898 have been transcribed and digitized by faculty and staff of Paul Robeson Library, Rutgers Camden, and are now available online. “

Pappas Post: Philadelphia Historical Society Preserves City’s Greek Musical Heritage

Pappas Post: Philadelphia Historical Society Preserves City’s Greek Musical Heritage. “In recent years, the Greek American Heritage Society of Philadelphia has been on a long-term mission, collecting countless photographs and other materials for a digital library to preserve the city’s rich Greek heritage and history. But it is not just any digital library; it is a historical record being put together through public photo submissions that tells the story of more than 100 years of Greek music in Philadelphia.”

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence

JD Supra: Pennsylvania Superior Court Adopts New Standard for Social Media Evidence. “In Commonwealth v. Mangel, 2018 WL 1322179 (March 15, 2018), the Pennsylvania Superior Court adopted a standard for authenticating social media posts under Pennsylvania Rule of Evidence 901. The Court held that ‘the proponent of social media evidence must present direct or circumstantial evidence that tends to corroborate the identity of the author of the communication in question, such as testimony from the person who sent or received the communication, or contextual clues in the communication tending to reveal the identity of the sender.'”

The Daily Pennsylvanian: Two Penn alumni launch VOHTE — a ‘one-stop shop’ for voters to get info on all candidates

The Daily Pennsylvanian: Two Penn alumni launch VOHTE — a ‘one-stop shop’ for voters to get info on all candidates. “2014 Wharton graduate Sean Danowski and 2014 Penn Law graduate Dafan Zhang recently launched VOHTE — a mobile-friendly website that will act as a resource for Pennsylvania voters looking to learn more about candidates in their district. Zhang said he came up with the idea for VOHTE after running for State House in 2014 while simultaneously studying at Penn Law. Zhang, who said he did not have a large campaign fund, ended up losing the election, and said in an interview with The Daily Pennsylvania that he saw his inability to reach voters as a systematic problem.”

Pennsylvania Historic Preservation: Sharing PA-SHARE

Pennsylvania Historic Preservation: Sharing PA-SHARE. “Over its 50 years of operation, the PA State Historic Preservation Office (PA SHPO) has produced and received a large and varied quantity of archival materials. This includes Environmental Review files, more than 13,000 archaeology and above ground survey reports, 165,000 historic and archaeological resource forms, National Register nominations, tax credit applications, and more that amounts to millions of pages of paper documents and photographs.”