My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched

My Champlain Valley: Public database of racial info from Vermont traffic stops launched. “Five years after Vermont law enforcement officers first became required to document the race of all drivers they pull over in traffic stops, that information has proven to be difficult to come by. However, a Vermont racial justice group has just made the data significantly easier to find.”

CNET: Facebook apologizes after anonymous post alleges racism at company

CNET: Facebook apologizes after anonymous post alleges racism at company. “Facebook apologized Friday after an anonymous online document alleged that black, Latino and Asian women continued to face racism at the company a year after a former employee brought the issue into public view. The post, titled ‘Facebook empowers racism against its employees of color’ and published on Medium, outlines incidents that 12 current and former employees experienced while on the job.”

Mashable: TikTok users of color call for better visibility on the For You Page

Mashable: TikTok users of color call for better visibility on the For You Page . “TikTok users are calling for more visibility for creators of color on the platform. The app’s For You Page, a never ending queue of trending content, displays videos based on content the user has already engaged with. Nobody outside of TikTok itself knows how the algorithm works, and TikTok declined to comment on it for Mashable, but some users claim that the app’s most popular faces are overwhelmingly white. Tired of not seeing people who look like them while scrolling through the app, the users are raising awareness for better representation.”

Londonist: Black Cultural Archives Just Made Over 4,000 Items Available Online

Londonist: Black Cultural Archives Just Made Over 4,000 Items Available Online. “The Black Cultural Archives in Brixton is one of London’s best resources for exploring the history of African and Caribbean communities in the UK. It’s continually open to the public, but has just become even more accessible, with the digitisation of over 4,000 items from its archives.”

Google using dubious tactics to target people with ‘darker skin’ in facial recognition project: sources (New York Daily News)

New York Daily News: Google using dubious tactics to target people with ‘darker skin’ in facial recognition project: sources. “… several people who worked for the project spoke to The News in lengthy interviews and said Google’s ravenous appetite for data led to questionable and misleading methods. They said teams were dispatched to target homeless people in Atlanta, unsuspecting students on college campuses around the U.S. and attendees of the BET Awards festivities in Los Angeles, among other places. The workers known as Google TVCs — an acronym to specify temps, vendors or contractors — told The News they were paid through a third-party employment firm called Randstad.”

Globe and Mail: Hands-on projects lead to major discoveries

Globe and Mail: Hands-on projects lead to major discoveries. “In the spring of 2018, approximately 20 students from Académie Ste-Cécile International School in Windsor, Ont., crouched low in a farmer’s field with crayons and paper in hand. But rather than drawing the surrounding landscape, the Grade 11 and 12 students were busy recording local history – one gravestone at a time…. While some of the county’s 18 known black cemeteries are still cared for by local churches or the government, others are abandoned, nearly invisible. That class trip for geography and history students launched what would eventually garner them ample media attention and an esteemed Lieutenant Governor’s Ontario Heritage Award For Youth Achievement.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”