NBC News: Gun violence is surging in cities, and hitting communities of color hardest

NBC News: Gun violence is surging in cities, and hitting communities of color hardest. “Over 1,500 people have been shot in Chicago, almost 900 in Philadelphia, and more than 500 in New York City so far in 2020 — all up significantly from the same time last year (1,018 in Chicago, 701 in Philadelphia and 355 in New York). The surge in shootings has been particularly painful for communities of color, which have disproportionately endured the weight of the COVID-19 crisis, the economic recession and social unrest following the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis in May.”

Eater London: New Recipe Collection to Support BAME Covid-19 Victims Raises £10,000 in First Day

Eater London: New Recipe Collection to Support BAME Covid-19 Victims Raises £10,000 in First Day. BAME stands for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic. “The author, activist, and Eater London contributor Riaz Phillips has launched a new digital recipe collection, with entries from over 100 cooks and writers from diasporic communities across the country. Community Comfort, which is available to download now for a minimum donation of £10, will donate all proceeds to the Majonzi COVID-19 Bereavement Fund in collaboration with the Ubele Initiative, which was set up by social commentator, Windrush campaigner, and cultural historian Patrick Vernon to support the communities disproportionately affected by the coronavirus crisis. Since the collection was made available for purchase yesterday, 9 July, it has been downloaded over 600 times, generating nearly £10,000 in under 24 hours.”

BNN Bloomberg: Google Campus Security Singled Out Black, Latinx Employees

BNN Bloomberg: Google Campus Security Singled Out Black, Latinx Employees. “Google’s campus security system subjected Black and Latinx workers to bias and prompted complaints to management, according to people familiar with the situation, leading the company to scrap a key part of the approach. The internet giant encouraged employees to check colleagues’ ID badges on campus, and asked security staff to do the same. This went beyond the typical corporate office system where workers swipe badges to enter. The policy was designed to prevent unauthorized visitors and keep Google’s open work areas safe.”

Wake Forest University: Do virtual meetings level the playing field for diverse voices?

Wake Forest University: Do virtual meetings level the playing field for diverse voices?. “Decades of research have shown that diverse organizations are more engaged and able to develop creative solutions to problems. The more diverse voices in the room, the more likely meaningful innovation will happen. But diversity is not the same as inclusion. Not everyone attending a meeting feels empowered to share their best ideas or offer opinions they feel the group may not want to hear. Can virtual meetings level the playing field? Not usually.”

New York Times: The Fullest Look Yet at the Racial Inequity of Coronavirus

New York Times: The Fullest Look Yet at the Racial Inequity of Coronavirus. “Early numbers had shown that Black and Latino people were being harmed by the virus at higher rates. But the new federal data — made available after The New York Times sued the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — reveals a clearer and more complete picture: Black and Latino people have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus in a widespread manner that spans the country, throughout hundreds of counties in urban, suburban and rural areas, and across all age groups.”

WCNC: CDHHS launches COVID-19 social media campaign to reach historically marginalized populations

WCNC: CDHHS launches COVID-19 social media campaign to reach historically marginalized populations. “The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) is launching a new social media marketing campaign as part of a larger public outreach campaign designed to reach historically marginalized populations disproportionately affected by COVID-19.”

Washington Post: Almost one-third of black Americans know someone who died of covid-19, survey shows

Washington Post: Almost one-third of black Americans know someone who died of covid-19, survey shows. “Nearly 1 in 3 black Americans know someone personally who has died of covid-19, far exceeding their white counterparts, according to a Washington Post-Ipsos poll that underscores the coronavirus pandemic’s profoundly disparate impact. The nationwide survey finds that 31 percent of black adults say they know someone firsthand who has been killed by the virus, compared with 17 percent of adults who are Hispanic and 9 percent who are white.”

CBS 19: Teachers create new website to share anti-racist resources

CBS 19: Teachers create new website to share anti-racist resources. “Three teachers from Cale Elementary School in Albemarle County worked together to create a new website with anti-racist resources to share with other teachers and people in the community. Chiaka Chuks, Jasmine Azimi, and Rachel Caldwell collaborated on the project in the wake of George Floyd’s death.” Not endless amounts of content yet, but a solid start.

Matador Network: How the EatOkra app helps diners ‘be aware and intentional’ of who they support

New-to-me, from Matador Network: How the EatOkra app helps diners ‘be aware and intentional’ of who they support . “The database — which currently lists 2,600 Black-owned restaurants, bakeries, cafes, food trucks, bars and wineries — is on the verge of a major expansion. Around 5,000 new businesses have reached out to Edwards since June 1, requesting to be added to the EatOkra directory.”

CNBC: Black doctors push for anti-bias training in medicine to combat health inequality

CNBC: Black doctors push for anti-bias training in medicine to combat health inequality. “George Floyd’s last words, ‘I can’t breathe,’ have become a rallying cry during the weeks of protests against police violence. Doctors writing in the New England Journal of Medicine use those words as a refrain to lay out how systemic racism has negatively impacted the health of African Americans and how this is the moment to change it.”

BNN Bloomberg: The Pandemic Is Exacerbating America’s Systemic Food Inequality

BNN Bloomberg: The Pandemic Is Exacerbating America’s Systemic Food Inequality. ” Access to food has been unequal in America long before the onset of the coronavirus. But the pandemic has deepened the problem, with images of snaking lines at food banks bringing the harsh reality to light. Even in the U.S., one of the most food-secure nations in the world, millions face difficulty in accessing nutritious meals. Food inequality disproportionately impacts Americans of color, who’ve already been among the hardest hit by Covid-19 and its economic fallout.”

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities

Emory University: Emory launches national dashboard to help visualize and target COVID-19 disparities. “On the homepage, users can see a snapshot of COVID-19 deaths across the country. Selecting a state brings up a map displaying COVID-19 mortality by county. Drilling down, users can select a county to see how it compares to the rest of the state and to the country in average daily cases and deaths, and in social characteristics, such as percentage of residents who are African-American, percentage who live in poverty, percentage who are obese, percentage who have diabetes, and more. The dashboard allows users to compare counties within the same state, aggregating key metrics that tell a story of a community’s social and economic health.”

CNBC: Powell warns of ‘significant uncertainty’ about the recovery and says small businesses are at risk

CNBC: Powell warns of ‘significant uncertainty’ about the recovery and says small businesses are at risk. “Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell warned Tuesday about ‘significant uncertainty’ regarding the pace of the U.S. economic recovery and said small businesses and lower-income and minority Americans are particularly at risk.”

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help

Londonist: The Home Of Black British History Is Creating A New Archive – With Your Help. “Black Cultural Archives is the only national heritage centre dedicated to collecting and sharing the stories and histories of African and Caribbean people in Britain — check out examples from their amazing archives here. Now they’re crowdsourcing material to document the Black Lives Matter movement and protests of 2020: this is your chance to make sure that the records that future generations will have available to them of this time will reflect the reality.”