Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Invitation to participate in a new project: Help open journals’ deep backfiles. “Thanks to IMLS-supported work we did at Penn, we’ve produced a complete inventory of serials from the first half of the 20th century that still have active copyright renewals associated with them. And I’ve noted that there was far more serial material without active copyright, as late as the 1960s or even later. We’ve also produced a guide to determining whether particular serial content you may be interested in is in the public domain. Now that we’ve spent a lot of time surveying what is still in copyright though, it’s worth turning more focused attention to serial content that isn’t in copyright, but still of interest to researchers. “

Everybody’s Library Questions: Copyright and advertisements (Everybody’s Libraries)

Everybody’s Libraries: Everybody’s Library Questions: Copyright and advertisements. “My previous post answered a reader question about how to determine whether a newspaper (or other serial issue) was under copyright or not. (More details about the process can be found in our guide ‘Determining copyright status of serial issues’.) Some people still wonder about the ads, though.”

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books. “It’s getting easier over time to find and use data on copyrights, and thereby to find and make use of materials in the public domain. Here’s a quick update on what’s new and what’s coming, in my projects and elsewhere.”

New-to-me: the International Association for the Preservation of Spiritualist and Occult Periodicals

New-to-me, but apparently around for a while: the archive of the International Association for the Preservation of Spiritualist and Occult Periodicals, at http://www.iapsop.com/. From the home page (and I must say this home page design is very 1997-1998, which is not a bad thing. It loads almost instantly): “The IAPSOP is a US-based private organization focused on the digital preservation of Spiritualist and occult periodicals published between the Congress of Vienna and the start of the Second World War. Our all-volunteer staff digitizes, indexes and makes available free-of-charge these periodicals, in our archive, for use by students and researchers.”

British Library: Endangered Urdu Periodicals

British Library: Endangered Urdu Periodicals. “EAP839 produced digital images of rare Urdu periodicals from the 19th to the first half of the 20th century in order to preserve and make them available to researchers. During this period the project team has successfully produced 3,832 issues. Urdu journals played a significant role in the development of Urdu literature, especially fiction, religion, history, poetry and culture of the South Asian region as a whole, particularly in Pakistan and India.” The material is not yet available online, but should be later this year.

Georgia State University: Georgia Association of Educators records open; periodicals online

Georgia State University: Georgia Association of Educators records open; periodicals online. “The records document the merger of the Georgia Education Association and the Georgia Teachers and Education Association, which represented white and black teachers, respectively, and integration of K-12 schools around the state circa 1970. Periodicals from the collection (1930-2017) have been digitized and are available online as part of GSU Library’s Digital Collections. Scholars, students, and the general public are invited to visit Special Collections and Archives to use the collection.”

Everybody’s Libraries: New IMLS-funded project: Opening access to 20th century public domain serials

Everybody’s Libraries: New IMLS-funded project: Opening access to 20th century public domain serials . “I’m happy to report that over the next year, I and others at Penn will be working on a project that the Institute of Museum and Library Services has just funded to help open access to the vast public domain of 20th century serials. We’ll be developing and demonstrating data sets and procedures to make it much easier to verify public domain status for content in scholarly journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and special interest periodicals published in the United States.”