ProPublica: Google Allowed a Sanctioned Russian Ad Company to Harvest User Data for Months

ProPublica: Google Allowed a Sanctioned Russian Ad Company to Harvest User Data for Months. “The day after Russia’s February invasion of Ukraine, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner sent a letter to Google warning it to be on alert for ‘exploitation of your platform by Russia and Russian-linked entities,’ and calling on the company to audit its advertising business’s compliance with economic sanctions. But as recently as June 23, Google was sharing potentially sensitive user data with a sanctioned Russian ad tech company owned by Russia’s largest state bank, according to a new report provided to ProPublica.”

MIT Technology Review: How to track your period safely post-Roe

MIT Technology Review: How to track your period safely post-Roe. “The fear is that in the hands of law enforcement, this data could be used to bolster a criminal case against a person who attempts to get an abortion in a state where it is restricted or banned. Understandably, a lot of people are scared and confused. So here’s our guide to what you need to know about period-tracking apps, what the apps’ makers say about their often murky privacy policies, and what alternative methods you can use to track your menstrual cycle that don’t involve handing your data over.”

CNET: Microsoft Restricts Its Facial Recognition Tools, Citing the Need for ‘Responsible AI’

CNET: Microsoft Restricts Its Facial Recognition Tools, Citing the Need for ‘Responsible AI’. “Microsoft is restricting access to its facial recognition tools, citing risks to society that the artificial intelligence systems could pose. The tech company released a 27-page ‘Responsible AI Standard’ on Tuesday that details the company’s goals toward equitable and trustworthy AI.”

CNET: Social Security Numbers Stolen in Flagstar Bank Data Breach

CNET: Social Security Numbers Stolen in Flagstar Bank Data Breach. “The personal information, including Social Security numbers, of more than 1.5 million Flagstar Bank customers was compromised in a data breach late last year, the company said. The Michigan-based bank, which operates 150 branches and is one of the country’s largest mortgage lenders, said in a disclosure to the state of Maine that its systems were hacked between Dec. 3 and 4 of last year but that the breach wasn’t discovered until earlier this month.”

BuzzFeed News: Leaked Audio From 80 Internal TikTok Meetings Shows That US User Data Has Been Repeatedly Accessed From China

BuzzFeed News: Leaked Audio From 80 Internal TikTok Meetings Shows That US User Data Has Been Repeatedly Accessed From China. “For years, TikTok has responded to data privacy concerns by promising that information gathered about users in the United States is stored in the United States, rather than China, where ByteDance, the video platform’s parent company, is located. But according to leaked audio from more than 80 internal TikTok meetings, China-based employees of ByteDance have repeatedly accessed nonpublic data about US TikTok users — exactly the type of behavior that inspired former president Donald Trump to threaten to ban the app in the United States.”

Krebs on Security: Ransomware Group Debuts Searchable Victim Data

Krebs on Security: Ransomware Group Debuts Searchable Victim Data. “Cybercrime groups that specialize in stealing corporate data and demanding a ransom not to publish it have tried countless approaches to shaming their victims into paying. The latest innovation in ratcheting up the heat comes from the ALPHV/BlackCat ransomware group, which has traditionally published any stolen victim data on the Dark Web. Today, however, the group began publishing individual victim websites on the public Internet, with the leaked data made available in an easily searchable form.”

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong’s privacy watchdog takes down 90 per cent of social media posts deemed to constitute doxxing under new law

South China Morning Post: Hong Kong’s privacy watchdog takes down 90 per cent of social media posts deemed to constitute doxxing under new law. “Hong Kong’s privacy watchdog has taken down about 90 per cent of social media posts it deemed constituted doxxing after legal amendments were passed last year to criminalise such behaviour.”

Security Boulevard: How to Prevent and Respond to Social Media Impersonations

Security Boulevard: How to Prevent and Respond to Social Media Impersonations. “Social media impersonations have become a very popular tactic to deploy online scams. Cybercriminals, fraudsters, and identity thieves alike pose as a trusted figure, such as a celebrity, corporate executive, or a well-known high-net worth individual, to try and trick unsuspecting people into taking an action, such as wiring money or sharing login credentials.”

Washington Post: Your kids’ apps are spying on them

Washington Post: Your kids’ apps are spying on them. “Apps are spying on our kids at a scale that should shock you. More than two-thirds of the 1,000 most popular iPhone apps likely to be used by children collect and send their personal information out to the advertising industry, according to a major new study shared with me by fraud and compliance software company Pixalate. On Android, 79 percent of popular kids apps do the same.”

Concordia University: Government websites and apps use the same tracking software as commercial ones, according to new Concordia research

Concordia University: Government websites and apps use the same tracking software as commercial ones, according to new Concordia research. “It’s no secret that the commercial websites and mobile apps we use every day are tracking us. Big companies like Facebook and Google depend on it. However, as a new paper by a team of Concordia researchers shows, businesses are not the only ones gathering up our private data. Governments across the world are incorporating the same tracking tools and empowering large businesses to track users of government services, even in jurisdictions where lawmakers are enacting legislation to restrict commercial trackers.”

WIRED: The Race to Hide Your Voice

WIRED: The Race to Hide Your Voice. “As machines become better at understanding you through your voice, companies are cashing in. Voice recognition systems—from Siri and Alexa to those using your voice as your password—have proliferated in recent years as artificial intelligence and machine learning have unlocked the ability to understand not just what you are saying but who you are. Big Voice may be a $20 billion industry within a few years. And as the market grows, privacy-focused researchers are increasingly searching for ways to protect people from having their voice data used against them.”