Harvard Business Review: What You Need to Know About California’s New Data Privacy Law

Harvard Business Review: What You Need to Know About California’s New Data Privacy Law. “Late last month, California passed a sweeping consumer privacy law that might force significant changes on companies that deal in personal data — and especially those operating in the digital space. The law’s passage comes on the heels of a few days of intense negotiation among privacy advocates, technology startups, network providers, Silicon Valley internet companies, and others. Those discussions have resulted in what many are describing as a landmark policy constituting the most stringent data protection regime in the United States.”

BetaNews: Timehop admits its security breach was worse than first thought

BetaNews: Timehop admits its security breach was worse than first thought. “The security breach suffered by Timehop on July 4 was much more serious than the company first thought. In an update to its original announcement, the company has revealed that while the number of account affected by the breach — 21 million — has not changed, the range of personal data accessed by hackers is much broader.”

CNN: Russian company had access to Facebook user data through apps

CNN: Russian company had access to Facebook user data through apps. “A Russian internet company with links to the Kremlin was among the firms to which Facebook gave an extension which allowed them to collect data on unknowing users of the social network after a policy change supposedly stopped such collection.”

Forbes: Google Has Been Letting App Developers Gain Access To Users’ Gmails, Unsurprisingly

Forbes: Google Has Been Letting App Developers Gain Access To Users’ Gmails, Unsurprisingly. “Google has reportedly allowed third-party developers of Android apps to review millions of Gmail messages, which seems about right. On Monday, a report by The Wall Street Journal drew attention to the fact that access settings for Gmail, Google’s popular email platform, allow users to opt-in to sharing data with developers, which can include users’ personal content and details.”

The Verge: Samsung phones are spontaneously texting users’ photos to random contacts without their permission

The Verge: Samsung phones are spontaneously texting users’ photos to random contacts without their permission. “Bad news for Samsung phone owners: some devices are randomly sending your camera roll photos to your contacts without permission. As first spotted by Gizmodo, users are complaining about the issue on Reddit and the company’s official forums. One user says his phone sent all his photos to his girlfriend. The messages are being sent through Samsung’s default texting app Samsung Messages. According to reports, the Messages app does not even show users that files have been sent; many just find out after they get a response from the recipient of the random photos sent to them.” The heck?

Quartz: California just passed the toughest data privacy bill in the US

Quartz: California just passed the toughest data privacy bill in the US. “In one day (June 28th), the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 unanimously passed both legislative chambers and was signed into law by governor Jerry Brown. Similar to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which went live in Europe in May, the law requires that Californians have access to and the ability to delete the data tech companies hold on them. It also gives users the ability to opt out of companies sharing (and theoretically selling) their data to third parties.”