NBC News: Hackers are leaking children’s data — and there’s little parents can do

NBC News: Hackers are leaking children’s data — and there’s little parents can do. “Some schools contacted about the leaks appeared unaware of the problem. And even after schools are able to resume operations following an attack, parents have little recourse when their children’s information is leaked. Some of the data is personal, like medical conditions or family financial statuses. Other pieces of data, such as Social Security numbers or birthdays, are permanent indicators of who they are, and their theft can set up a child for a lifetime of potential identity theft.”

Pattaya Mail: Thai Public Health Ministry’s database of 16 million patients hacked, probed

Pattaya Mail: Thai Public Health Ministry’s database of 16 million patients hacked, probed. “Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul has ordered investigation into the report that the database of 16 million patients under the supervision of the Public Health Ministry was hacked. Mr Anutin said he received an initial report that the incident happened in Phetchabun province and people should not panic while concerned officials were responding to it.”

The Register: Indonesian authorities probe million-record leak from national COVID app

The Register: Indonesian authorities probe million-record leak from national COVID app. “Indonesia’s Ministry of Communications and Informatics is investigating a leak of over a million records from the nation’s COVID-19 quarantine management app. News of the leak was revealed on August 30th by security review site vpnMentor, which wrote that its research team discovered exposed databases generated by eHAC, an app that is mandatory for use by travellers moving into and out of Indonesia, or within its borders.”

Abigail Spanberger: Without major changes, more Americans could be victims of online crime

Abigail Spanberger; Without major changes, more Americans could be victims of online crime. “If signed into law, the Better Cybercrime Metrics Act would improve our cybercrime metrics, anticipate future trends, and make sure law enforcement has the tools and resources they need. Our bill would require federal reporting on the effectiveness of current cybercrime mechanisms and highlight disparities in reporting data between cybercrime data and other types of crime data.”

The Conversation: Data privacy laws in the US protect profit but prevent sharing data for public good – people want the opposite

The Conversation: Data privacy laws in the US protect profit but prevent sharing data for public good – people want the opposite. “U.S. data protection laws often widely permit using data for profit but are more restrictive of socially beneficial uses. We wanted to ask a simple question: Do U.S. privacy laws actually protect data in the ways that Americans want? Using a national survey, we found that the public’s preferences are inconsistent with the restrictions imposed by U.S. privacy laws.”

CNET: Instagram users must disclose their birthday to the company going forward

CNET: Instagram users must disclose their birthday to the company going forward. “If you haven’t already informed it of your birthday, Instagram will start to ask you for that information when you open the app. You’ll receive a handful of reminder notifications, according to Instagram, but if you haven’t provided your birthday by a certain point, you won’t be able to use the app.”

Washington Post: How to block Facebook from snooping on you

Washington Post: How to block Facebook from snooping on you. “Facebook says it’s not literally activating the microphones on our smartphones, but it is tracking what we do in other apps, websites and even real-world stores. That much data can make ads feel as on-point as if it was in the room…. So what can you do about it? If you’re very committed — or a bit techie — there are some steps you can take to try to hide from Facebook’s personal data vacuum.”

Washington Post: There’s no escape from Facebook, even if you don’t use it

Washington Post: There’s no escape from Facebook, even if you don’t use it. “Megan Borovicka joined Facebook in 2013 and then forgot she even had an account. But Facebook never forgot about her. The 42-year-old Oakland, Calif., lawyer never picked any ‘friends,’ posted any status updates, liked any photos or even opened the Facebook app on her phone. Yet over the last decade, Facebook has used an invisible data vacuum to suction up very specific details about her life — from her brand of underwear to where she received her paycheck.”

Fast Company: Hate your Google search results? Now there’s a how-to guide for removing information

Fast Company: Hate your Google search results? Now there’s a how-to guide for removing information. “Recent events in Afghanistan have highlighted how detrimental people’s past online activity can quickly become. Afghans are scrambling to erase data about themselves from the internet that the Taliban may use to extract retribution. Thankfully, many tech giants are stepping up to protect Afghani users and help them hide or remove their data.”

NBC News: T-Mobile CEO apologizes after hacker stole millions of users’ personal information

NBC News: T-Mobile CEO apologizes after hacker stole millions of users’ personal information. “T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert published an open apology to customers Friday after hackers stole more than 50 million users’ personal data, including their Social Security numbers and driver’s license information.” As the article points out, T-Mobile has an extensive history of security issues.

Motherboard: How Data Brokers Sell Access to the Backbone of the Internet

Motherboard: How Data Brokers Sell Access to the Backbone of the Internet. “There’s something of an open secret in the cybersecurity world: internet service providers quietly give away detailed information about which computer is communicating with another to private businesses, which then sells access to that data to a range of third parties, according to multiple sources in the threat intelligence industry.”

New York Times: A Thumbs Down for Streaming Privacy

New York Times: A Thumbs Down for Streaming Privacy. “Common Sense Media, a nonprofit advocacy group for children and families, published a report this week that found that most of America’s popular streaming services and TV streaming gadgets such as Netflix, Roku and Disney+ failed to meet the group’s minimum requirements for privacy and security practices. The lone exception was Apple.”

Wired: 38M Records Were Exposed Online—Including Contact-Tracing Info

Wired: 38M Records Were Exposed Online—Including Contact-Tracing Info. “MORE THAN A thousand web apps mistakenly exposed 38 million records on the open internet, including data from a number of Covid-19 contact tracing platforms, vaccination sign-ups, job application portals, and employee databases. The data included a range of sensitive information, from people’s phone numbers and home addresses to social security numbers and Covid-19 vaccination status.”

Bleeping Computer: AT&T denies data breach after hacker auctions 70 million user database

Bleeping Computer: AT&T denies data breach after hacker auctions 70 million user database. “From the samples shared by the threat actor, the database contains customers’ names, addresses, phone numbers, Social Security numbers, and date of birth. A security researcher who wishes to remain anonymous told BleepingComputer that two of the four people in the samples were confirmed to have accounts on att.com. Other than these few details, not much is known about the database, how it was acquired, and whether it is authentic.”