Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Peru allows Venezuela medics amid pandemic. “Peru is letting thousands of Venezuelan health workers who fled their country join the Peruvian health system during the coronavirus pandemic. Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra signed a decree which exempts qualified foreign doctors and nurses from having to validate their degrees. Peru has more than 430,000 cases of coronavirus and its health service has been struggling.”

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking

Bloomberg: It’s Covid Code Red in Latin America With No Signs of Peaking. “When a top World Health Organization official this week declared Latin America the new epicenter for Covid-19, few experts in the region needed to be persuaded. The data are overwhelming — and overwhelmingly dreadful. The number of regional cases stands at 1.17 million. Demographic giants Brazil and Mexico are posting among the fastest growth rates and logging daily death records. Viral illness is also rising in Peru, Colombia, Chile and Bolivia.”

Yale News: Yale, Field Museum map species diversity in South American national parks

Yale News: Yale, Field Museum map species diversity in South American national parks. “Park rangers, naturalists, tourists, educators, and land managers can now take a virtual tour of species diversity across three South American countries thanks to a new information dashboard created by researchers at Yale University and the Field Museum in Chicago. The Biodiversity Dashboard lists almost 5,500 species found in and around national parks in three of the world’s most biodiverse countries: Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.”

Ars Technica: Archaeologists found 143 more images among the Nazca Lines

Ars Technica: Archaeologists found 143 more images among the Nazca Lines. “Archaeologists have rediscovered 143 more enormous drawings called geoglyphs etched on the rocky ground of Peru’s Nazca Desert, with one of the finds coming courtesy of a machine-learning algorithm. The new images emphasize how much ancient art lies on the 450 square kilometer (280 square mile) Nazca Desert and how much of it archaeologists still need to find and document.”

TechCrunch: Alphabet’s Loon signs deal with Telefonica to provide internet to remote parts of the Amazon

TechCrunch: Alphabet’s Loon signs deal with Telefonica to provide internet to remote parts of the Amazon. “Alphabet-owned Loon, the high-altitude balloon company that is using its stratospheric technology to provide internet connectivity on Earth, has signed a new commercial agreement with Telefonica-owned Internet para Todos (IpT). The IpT initiative, which is also backed in part by Facebook and the Development Bank of Latin America, aims to provide internet connectivity to users in remote locations across Latin America, and its deal with Loon will specifically connect users in remote parts of the Amazon rainforest in Peru.”

Implant files: International journalism body creates database to track faulty medical devices (Scroll .in)

Scroll .in: Implant files: International journalism body creates database to track faulty medical devices. “The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists has compiled a global database of medical devices that are either faulty or dangerous. It allows users to explore more than 70,000 recalls, safety alerts and field safety notices of medical devices in 11 countries – Australia, Canada, Finland, India, Lebanon, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Spain, Switzerland and the United States – in its first release.”

Google Launches “Day of the Dead” Exhibit

Google has launched a “Day of the Dead” exhibition (AND quoted Octavio Paz, one of my favorite poets!) “Today, we want to invite everyone to experience Mexico’s tradition of paying tribute to life, through the Day of the Dead exhibition on Google Arts & Culture. The content is curated by 10 cultural organizations from Mexico, Peru and the United States and explores the Pre-Columbian roots of this festivity, its many transformations through history and its contemporary manifestations as told by pieces of archaeology, folk art, prints, paintings, sculptures, street art and many other artforms. The collection includes over 500 artworks and artifacts, 20 exhibits, 11 Street View virtual tours through cemeteries and museums and two guided tours that users can experience with a Cardboard viewer.”

Machu Picchu on Google Street Viewhu

The ruins of Machu Picchu are now on Google Street View. “After virtually touring these sacred and ceremonial spaces, discover more Wonders of Machu Picchu on the Google Cultural Institute. You can explore more than 130 Inca artifacts online thanks to the Museo Macchupicchu at Casa Concha. In three new online exhibits, the museum’s curators share their expert insights on the Inca’s daily life and rituals—which are still a subject of great mystery and fascination over 500 years later. “