Pew: Three Months In, Many Americans See Exaggeration, Conspiracy Theories and Partisanship in COVID-19 News

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!- yes, I must do it here too.): Three Months In, Many Americans See Exaggeration, Conspiracy Theories and Partisanship in COVID-19 News. “As Americans continue to process a steady flow of information about the coronavirus outbreak – from changing infection and death rates to new testing protocols and evolving social distancing guidelines – they give the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other public health organizations the highest rating when it comes to getting the facts right. And they give Donald Trump and his administration the lowest rating for ‘getting the facts right’ among five key sources of COVID-19 information, according to a Pew Research Center survey of 9,654 U.S. adults conducted June 4-10, 2020, as part of the American News Pathways project.”

The Digital Pulpit: A Nationwide Analysis of Online Sermons (Pew)

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): The Digital Pulpit: A Nationwide Analysis of Online Sermons. “Frequent churchgoers may have a good sense of what kind of sermons to expect from their own clergy: how long they usually last, how much they dwell on biblical texts, whether the messages lean toward fire and brimstone or toward love and self-acceptance. But what are other Americans hearing from the pulpits in their congregations?” The methodology was as fascinating to me as the research.

Pew: An update on our research into trust, facts and democracy

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): An update on our research into trust, facts and democracy “A little over a year ago, Pew Research Center decided to intensify its research focus on the theme of trust, facts and democracy. The decision reflected a changing world: In the U.S. and abroad, anxiety over misinformation has increased alongside political polarization and growing fragmentation of the media. Faith in expertise and institutions has declined, cynicism has risen, and citizens are becoming their own information curators. All of these trends are fundamentally changing the way people arrive at the kind of informed opinions that can drive effective governance and political compromise.”

Pew: What our transition to online polling means for decades of phone survey trends

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW): What our transition to online polling means for decades of phone survey trends. “The fact that many public opinion surveys today are conducted online is no secret to avid poll watchers. What is not well known, however, is what this migration to online polling means for the country’s trove of data documenting American public opinion over the past four decades, on issues ranging from abortion and immigration to race relations and military interventions. Specifically, can pollsters just add new online results to a long chain of phone survey results, or is this an apples-to-oranges situation that requires us to essentially throw out the historical data and start anew?”

Pew: Gender and Jobs in Online Image Searches

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Gender and Jobs in Online Image Searches. “Online media organizations, social media sites and individuals add vast quantities of images to the web each day. These images can then appear in search engines as users look for pictures representing common phrases or topics. Because the way that men and women are represented in these online search results might be connected to the way people understand gender and society, some academic researchers have specifically focused on the ways women and men are depicted in the workplace in online images.”

Pew: Public Attitudes Toward Computer Algorithms

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Public Attitudes Toward Computer Algorithms. “Algorithms are all around us, utilizing massive stores of data and complex analytics to make decisions with often significant impacts on humans. They recommend books and movies for us to read and watch, surface news stories they think we might find relevant, estimate the likelihood that a tumor is cancerous and predict whether someone might be a criminal or a worthwhile credit risk. But despite the growing presence of algorithms in many aspects of daily life, a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults finds that the public is frequently skeptical of these tools when used in various real-life situations.”

Tubefilter: Most Parents Who Let Their Kids Watch YouTube Have Encountered Disturbing Videos (Study)

Tubefilter: Most Parents Who Let Their Kids Watch YouTube Have Encountered Disturbing Videos (Study). “A new study from Pew Research Center confirms widespread concerns about young children encountering objectionable content on YouTube. The survey found that a sweeping majority of parents — four out of five, to be exact — let their young children (aged 11 and younger) watch YouTube videos. And while this may be encouraging news for the video giant, the study also found that a majority of this group of parents — 61% — say that their kids have seen disturbing content on the platform, The Wall Street Journal reports.”

Pew: A Majority of Teens Have Experienced Some Form of Cyberbullying

Pew (no PEW PEW because I don’t like to joke about this): A Majority of Teens Have Experienced Some Form of Cyberbullying. “59% of U.S. teens have been bullied or harassed online, and a similar share says it’s a major problem for people their age. At the same time, teens mostly think teachers, social media companies and politicians are failing at addressing this issue.”

Pew: Internet, social media use and device ownership in U.S. have plateaued after years of growth

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Internet, social media use and device ownership in U.S. have plateaued after years of growth. “The use of digital technology has had a long stretch of rapid growth in the United States, but the share of Americans who go online, use social media or own key devices has remained stable the past two years, according to a new analysis of Pew Research Center data.”

Pew: News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2018

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2018. “About two-thirds of American adults (68%) say they at least occasionally get news on social media, about the same share as at this time in 2017, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Many of these consumers, however, are skeptical of the information they see there: A majority (57%) say they expect the news they see on social media to be largely inaccurate. Still, most social media news consumers say getting news this way has made little difference in their understanding of current events, and more say it has helped than confused them (36% compared with 15%).”

Pew: Activism in the Social Media Age

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Activism in the Social Media Age. “This month marks the fifth anniversary of the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag, which was first coined following the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin. In the course of those five years, #BlackLivesMatter has become an archetypal example of modern protests and political engagement on social media: A new Pew Research Center analysis of public tweets finds the hashtag has been used nearly 30 million times on Twitter – an average of 17,002 times per day – as of May 1, 2018.”

Pew: Distinguishing Between Factual and Opinion Statements in the News

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Distinguishing Between Factual and Opinion Statements in the News. “In today’s fast-paced and complex information environment, news consumers must make rapid-fire judgments about how to internalize news-related statements – statements that often come in snippets and through pathways that provide little context. A new Pew Research Center survey of 5,035 U.S. adults examines a basic step in that process: whether members of the public can recognize news as factual – something that’s capable of being proved or disproved by objective evidence – or as an opinion that reflects the beliefs and values of whoever expressed it.”

Pew: Declining Majority of Online Adults Say the Internet Has Been Good for Society

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): Declining Majority of Online Adults Say the Internet Has Been Good for Society. “…Americans have grown somewhat more ambivalent about the impact of digital connectivity on society as a whole. A sizable majority of online adults (70%) continue to believe the internet has been a good thing for society. Yet the share of online adults saying this has declined by a modest but still significant 6 percentage points since early 2014, when the Center first asked the question.” I can’t even imagine what the response is going to be to this question this time next year.

Pew: Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy

Pew (pew pew pew pew pew!): Our expanded focus on trust, facts and the state of democracy. “Today, we are issuing a comprehensive look at public attitudes on the state of American democracy. In the months ahead, we will examine how Americans balance the desire to address false news and First Amendment freedoms, explore how news consumers differentiate between fact and opinion in news content, and add to our existing research on how trust functions in democracies. We also plan to take a close look at public confidence in the electoral process. And in an upcoming 30-nation study, we will bring a global perspective to these issues.”

Bots on Twitter share two-thirds of links to popular websites: Pew (TechCrunch)

TechCrunch: Bots on Twitter share two-thirds of links to popular websites: Pew . “It’s official: Bots are doing a lot of PR grunt work on Twitter — especially when it comes to promoting porn websites. That perhaps unsurprising conclusion about what automated Twitter accounts are link sharing comes courtesy of a new study by the Pew Research Center which set out to quantify one aspect of bot-based activity in the Twittersphere.”