State of Minnesota: State rolls out dashboard showing PFAS monitoring results for drinking water

State of Minnesota: State rolls out dashboard showing PFAS monitoring results for drinking water . “Minnesota residents who get their drinking water from a community public water system will now be able to find out if their system’s water has any level of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), through an interactive online dashboard unveiled today by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH).”

News@Northeastern: This Map IDs Cancer-causing Chemical Sites In Your Neighborhood

News@Northeastern: This Map IDs Cancer-causing Chemical Sites In Your Neighborhood. “Just how toxic is your community? No, this isn’t about contentious school committee meetings or surly neighbors. Neighborhoods across the country are contaminated with long-lasting, cancer-causing toxins called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS, and researchers at Northeastern recently unveiled an interactive, online map that identifies areas with high levels of the chemicals.”

Revealed: more than 120,000 US sites feared to handle harmful PFAS ‘forever’ chemicals (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Revealed: more than 120,000 US sites feared to handle harmful PFAS ‘forever’ chemicals. “The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified more than 120,000 locations around the US where people may be exposed to a class of toxic ‘forever chemicals’ associated with various cancers and other health problems that is a frightening tally four times larger than previously reported, according to data obtained by the Guardian.”

Chemical & Engineering News: New database amasses toxicity studies on PFAS

Chemical & Engineering News: New database amasses toxicity studies on PFAS. “A first-of-its-kind database assembles hundreds of toxicology studies on 29 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The database is aimed at assisting communities exposed to PFAS contamination and helping policy makers access scientific literature on these substances, says Katherine E. Pelch, a professor at the University of North Texas School of Public Health.”

EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One (Environmental Working Group)

EWG: EWG: PFAS Chemicals Must Be Regulated as a Class, Not One by One. “The known extent of contamination of American communities with the toxic fluorinated compounds known as PFAS continues to grow at an alarming rate, with no end in sight. As of March 2019, at least 610 locations in 43 states are known to be contaminated, including drinking water systems serving an estimated 19 million people.”