Techdirt: Philippines Lawmaker Introduces ‘Fake News’ Bill That Would Allow The National Police To Literally Police Speech

Techdirt: Philippines Lawmaker Introduces ‘Fake News’ Bill That Would Allow The National Police To Literally Police Speech. “The latest country to add a speech-squashing, government-expanding ‘fake news’ bill to its roster of bad ideas is the Philippines. The proposal doesn’t use the terminology du jour, but ‘fake news’ by any other name is still ‘fake news.’ Here’s the immediate effect the ‘Anti-False Content Act’ would have on the country’s population.”

Washington Post: Why crafty Internet trolls in the Philippines may be coming to a website near you

Washington Post: Why crafty Internet trolls in the Philippines may be coming to a website near you. “The world of Internet trolls — the gaslighting, the fabrications, the nastiness — is now a fact of life in the Web ecosystem nearly everywhere. But something new is happening here: Experienced public relations experts in the Philippines are harnessing the raw energy of young and aggressive social media shape-shifters.”

CDN: Digital Cebuano, NCCA project goes online

CDN: Digital Cebuano, NCCA project goes online. “The project continues an earlier project with the NCCA [National Commission for Culture and the Arts] – the Shared Future project – which was completed in 2017. For this recent addition, the materials freshly digitized are the Nueva Fuerza newspapers and some more years of the Bag-ong Kusog newspapers, both high-traffic early twentieth century periodicals for local and foreign researchers. The project covers eight years (8) years of Nueva Fuerza and four (4) years of Bag-ong Kusog.” Cebuano is a language spoken by over 10 million people in the Philippines. See this article in Britannica. Some people argue that Cebuano is not a separate language at all but is a dialect of Bisaya.

PLOS One: Reliance on Facebook for news and its influence on political engagement

PLOS One: Reliance on Facebook for news and its influence on political engagement. “This paper examines the link between reliance on Facebook for news, political knowledge, and political engagement in the Philippines. We tested five hypotheses using data gathered from an online survey of 978 Filipinos conducted from February 1 to March 31, 2016. Findings support the hypothesis that those who rely less on social media as a news source exhibit higher levels of perceived knowledge about politics than those who rely more on it for news.”

‘Seeded in social media’: Jailed Philippine journalist says Facebook is partly responsible for her predicament (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Seeded in social media’: Jailed Philippine journalist says Facebook is partly responsible for her predicament. “The arrest this month of Philippine journalist Maria Ressa, which experts say is a retaliatory move for exposing violence-inciting fake accounts on Facebook linked to President Rodrigo Duterte’s administration, raises the question of the company’s culpability for her dangerous predicament.”

Understanding Violent Extremism: Messaging and Recruitment Strategies on Social Media in the Philippines (ReliefWeb)

ReliefWeb: Understanding Violent Extremism: Messaging and Recruitment Strategies on Social Media in the Philippines. “The first news that militants had taken to the streets of the Islamic City of Marawi on May 23, 2017, came from Facebook. Pictures of masked men carrying assault rifles and waving the black flag of the Islamic State were swirling across social media well before Philippine and international news channels picked up the story. By the time the military and the media had begun to respond, Marawi’s residents were already streaming out of the city by the tens of thousands to seek refuge from the violence. The fact that news of the siege spread first on Facebook isn’t surprising. Over 60 million Filipinos have access to the internet; of those, 97 percent are on Facebook. For many, Facebook is the internet, a circumstance encouraged by local telecoms that offer free access to the social media site without the need for a paid data plan.”