Yahoo! Groups’ closure and a tale of Oftel: Die-hard users ‘informally’ included telcos (The Register)

The Register: Yahoo! Groups’ closure and a tale of Oftel: Die-hard users ‘informally’ included telcos. “The tossing away of user-generated content on Yahoo!’s long-running Groups site on Wednesday was not just bad news for all the hardcore users who are about to lose all their precious things stored there. Many were quick to point at telcos, who were using Yahoo! Groups to manage phone number assignments.” WOW.

CNET: A hacker assault left mobile carriers open to network shutdown

CNET: A hacker assault left mobile carriers open to network shutdown. “Hackers have quietly infiltrated more than a dozen mobile carriers around the world, gaining complete control of networks behind the companies’ backs. The attackers have been using that access over the last seven years to steal sensitive data, but have so much control they could shut down communications at a moment’s notice, according to Cybereason, a security company based in Boston.”

The Intercept: Thanks To Facebook, Your Cellphone Company Is Watching You More Closely Than Ever

The Intercept: Thanks To Facebook, Your Cellphone Company Is Watching You More Closely Than Ever. “AMONG THE MEGA-CORPORATIONS that surveil you, your cellphone carrier has always been one of the keenest monitors, in constant contact with the one small device you keep on you at almost every moment. A confidential Facebook document reviewed by The Intercept shows that the social network courts carriers, along with phone makers — some 100 different companies in 50 countries — by offering the use of even more surveillance data, pulled straight from your smartphone by Facebook itself.”

FCC, Tech Companies Teaming Up to Stop Robocalls

A bunch of tech companies are teaming up with the FCC to stop robocalls. We can only hope. “Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, has asked wireless and wireline phone companies to offer call-blocking services to customers at no cost. The robocall strike force plans to report to the FCC by Oct. 19 on ‘concrete plans to accelerate the development and adoption of new tools and solutions,’ AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said in a statement.”