Stanford University: Cantor Arts Center and Stanford Libraries collaborate to make Warhol photography archives publicly available

Stanford University: Cantor Arts Center and Stanford Libraries collaborate to make Warhol photography archives publicly available . “For those who ever wondered about the exact design of John Lennon’s iconic glasses or what it would have been like to have had a front-row seat at Maria Shriver’s wedding to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the newly accessible archive of Andy Warhol’s photography provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personal with the social and art-world celebrities of the time.”

Calvert Journal: This new online talent hub is showcasing Russia’s best young photographers

Calvert Journal: This new online talent hub is showcasing Russia’s best young photographers. “Currently featuring 47 emerging photographers, the Attention Hub will highlight pioneering artists for collectors, curators and institutions. The charity hopes that the database, available in English and Russian, will break down stereotypes and challenge cultural isolation.” Some of the pictures in the article do show nudity.

Art Guide Australia: Ilona Nelson, This Wild Song

Art Guide Australia: Ilona Nelson, This Wild Song. “This Wild Song is a long-term project by artist and curator Ilona Nelson. Galvanised by recent statistics around gender inequality in the arts (for example the 2015 Countess Report), Nelson has made it her mission to champion and celebrate Australian female artists through photographic portraiture. Involving more than 100 practitioners so far, This Wild Song has evolved to encompass a growing online archive of photographs and interviews, exhibitions, public forums and most recently a podcast.”

ABC13: Janice Rubin, renowned photographer impacted by Harvey, donates collection to UH

ABC13: Janice Rubin, renowned photographer impacted by Harvey, donates collection to UH. “A famed photojournalist just gave the University of Houston the gift of a lifetime. Janice Rubin donated 15,000 pieces to the UH Libraries Special Collections. The images date back to 1976, showcasing iconic Houston leaders and ordinary life.”

NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back

NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back . “‘We removed your post because it doesn’t follow [Instagram’s] community guidelines. If you violate our guidelines again, your account may be restricted or disabled.’ That vague, fateful warning is one Gio Black Peter has received time and time again. To date, Peter, a queer New York-based visual artist, has cycled through 10 Instagram accounts, 15 Facebook pages, two YouTube accounts, and four Vimeo profiles. And he’s not alone: For queer fine artists‚ particularly those whose work includes nudity, censorship on social media is an unfortunate reality. These platforms—all vital networking assets and creative tools for working artists in the digital age—are notorious for their harsh censorship practices, especially when it comes to nudity.” The nudity in the images accompanying this article is blocked out.

303 Magazine: This Photographer Is Creating A Digital Archive Of Old Denver

303 Magazine: This Photographer Is Creating A Digital Archive Of Old Denver. “Born in Mexico but a native son of Denver’s Northside, Fuentes is the curator of the @olddenver Instagram account and a documentarian of the city’s historical yet disappearing cultural landscapes. Through both his photographic work and curating others via the #olddenver hashtag, Fuentes crafts a digital archive of the Denver communities he was raised in. Through his documenting, he aims to promote spaces he feels are being forgotten in the current narrative of the city.”

Artnet: Nearly 100,000 Previously Unseen Photos by Andy Warhol Will Be Made Public This Fall

Artnet: Nearly 100,000 Previously Unseen Photos by Andy Warhol Will Be Made Public This Fall . “Pop art fans, rejoice! The Andy Warhol Foundation will release tens of thousands of the artist’s previously unseen photographs for the first time, including intimate images of the artist’s celebrity friends and lovers. In total, 3,600 contact sheets featuring more than 130,000 images were acquired by Stanford University, which will digitize and release the images online as part of a new initiative called the Contact Warhol Project.”