NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back

NewNowNext: These Queer Artists Were Censored on Social Media. Now, They’re Fighting Back . “‘We removed your post because it doesn’t follow [Instagram’s] community guidelines. If you violate our guidelines again, your account may be restricted or disabled.’ That vague, fateful warning is one Gio Black Peter has received time and time again. To date, Peter, a queer New York-based visual artist, has cycled through 10 Instagram accounts, 15 Facebook pages, two YouTube accounts, and four Vimeo profiles. And he’s not alone: For queer fine artists‚ particularly those whose work includes nudity, censorship on social media is an unfortunate reality. These platforms—all vital networking assets and creative tools for working artists in the digital age—are notorious for their harsh censorship practices, especially when it comes to nudity.” The nudity in the images accompanying this article is blocked out.

303 Magazine: This Photographer Is Creating A Digital Archive Of Old Denver

303 Magazine: This Photographer Is Creating A Digital Archive Of Old Denver. “Born in Mexico but a native son of Denver’s Northside, Fuentes is the curator of the @olddenver Instagram account and a documentarian of the city’s historical yet disappearing cultural landscapes. Through both his photographic work and curating others via the #olddenver hashtag, Fuentes crafts a digital archive of the Denver communities he was raised in. Through his documenting, he aims to promote spaces he feels are being forgotten in the current narrative of the city.”

Artnet: Nearly 100,000 Previously Unseen Photos by Andy Warhol Will Be Made Public This Fall

Artnet: Nearly 100,000 Previously Unseen Photos by Andy Warhol Will Be Made Public This Fall . “Pop art fans, rejoice! The Andy Warhol Foundation will release tens of thousands of the artist’s previously unseen photographs for the first time, including intimate images of the artist’s celebrity friends and lovers. In total, 3,600 contact sheets featuring more than 130,000 images were acquired by Stanford University, which will digitize and release the images online as part of a new initiative called the Contact Warhol Project.”

David Goldblatt: Documenting a country’s values in visuals (Daily Maverick)

Daily Maverick: David Goldblatt: Documenting a country’s values in visuals. “As the world hears of the death of renowned photographer David Goldblatt at the age of 87 on 25 June, 2018, his photographs remind us of the life and times of generations living under apartheid – and beyond.” A digital archive is planned for Mr. Goldbatt’s work.

Ransom Center Magazine: Remembering photojournalist David Douglas Duncan, 1916–2018

Ransom Center Magazine: Remembering photojournalist David Douglas Duncan, 1916–2018. “The internationally-renowned American photojournalist David Douglas Duncan has died at age 102 in France. As Harry Ransom Center Curator of photography Jessica S. McDonald wrote in a recent tribute, ‘For decades, Americans at home and abroad learned of world events as they unfolded before Duncan’s camera, first during his service as a combat photographer with the United States Marine Corps during World War II, and then through his coverage of the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and conflicts in the Middle East for Life magazine. Delivered to millions of households each week through the illustrated press, Duncan’s photographs have played a profound role in informing the public and shaping history.'” This article links to a gallery of over 600+ of Mr. Duncan’s pictures.

Resource Magazine: Natives Photograph Wants To Help You Tell Authentic Indigenous Stories

Resource Magazine: Natives Photograph Wants To Help You Tell Authentic Indigenous Stories . “Today marks the first day in business for Natives Photograph, a database of Indigenous visual journalists. Founded by Josué Rivas, an indigenous photographer himself, and Daniella Zalcman, the founder of Women Photograph, the sites hopes to elevate the work of Indigenous photographers in an effort to ‘balance the way we tell stories about Indigenous people and spaces.'”

Bowery Boogie: 190 Bowery’s Jay Maisel Launches Archival Photo Website

Bowery Boogie: 190 Bowery’s Jay Maisel Launches Archival Photo Website. “According to the media advisory, Maisel reviewed ‘hundreds of thousands of 35mm Kodachrome slides’ from 1954 to 2000, and selected favorites for publication. Many were shot right here on the Bowery, including his home-studio at 190 Bowery.” I found the jazz collection the most striking but all the pictures here are great.