Vanity Fair: Introducing the Inaugural Silver List, Featuring 47 Exciting Contemporary Photographers Whose Work You Just Have to See

Vanity Fair: Introducing the Inaugural Silver List, Featuring 47 Exciting Contemporary Photographers Whose Work You Just Have to See. “Launched this year by the Silver Eye Center for Photography, in partnership with Carnegie Mellon University and the Black List, the Silver List features 47 extraordinary photographers, selected by 500 nonprofit photography curators, educators, scholars, publishers, and critics. The criteria were simple, but deeply personal for each respondent: who is a living, early-career photographer whose work deserves to be seen by more people?”

NC State University Libraries: Libraries receives archive of photographer John Mark Hall (‘75)

NC State University Libraries: Libraries receives archive of photographer John Mark Hall (‘75). “From the Metropolitan Museum of Art to the Yale University Art Gallery to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, whether working in Paris or Milan or London, John Mark Hall, born on a farm in rural NC, ascended to the top of his field. His architectural and interior photography graced the pages of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, House & Garden, Architectural Digest, Elle Decor, and Veranda, and his discerning eye and sophisticated taste left a lasting impression on the photography world.”

‘You can almost hear the music’: Bringing back the legacy of a Hampstead photographer (Ham & High)

Ham & High: ‘You can almost hear the music’: Bringing back the legacy of a Hampstead photographer. “Laelia Goehr was born in Russia in 1908, but fled the country during its revolution in the early 1920s for Berlin at age 13. While in Germany, Laelia performed in a cabaret duo, The Stone Sisters, and even played in the Moulin Rouge in Paris. However, Laelia was Jewish and later escaped Berlin for Britain in the build-up to World War Two. The move to London with her husband brought her burgeoning cabaret career to an end – but allowed her to start her prolific career in photography.”

Hindustan Times: Inspired by World War II photographers, Syrian archives pictures of Damascus homes to preserve them

Hindustan Times: Inspired by World War II photographers, Syrian archives pictures of Damascus homes to preserve them. “35-year-old Rania Kataf creates a digital archive of the buildings of Old Damascus, Syria’s war-torn capital, after being ‘inspired by European photographers who tried to document buildings in their cities during the Second World War so architects could later rebuild part of them’”

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’. “A Bradford boy’s pictures depicting ‘a side of life that has disappeared’ from the city have gone online. The exhibition, called Lad Wi’ Camera, shows the early photographs of Christopher Pratt, who was born in the city in 1888. He started to take pictures in about 1900 when he would have been aged 12.” Surprisingly good photography, especially for a early 20th century kid.

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard. “The website, designed by Stamen Design working with Getty Digital, allows users to ‘drive’ down Sunset Boulevard in 12 different years between 1965 and 2007, as well as to view, search, and compare the more than 65,000 photographs of this key urban artery.”

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute. “Photographer Alfredo Boulton, who lived from 1908 to 1995, was a champion of modern art in Latin America and a key intellectual in 20th-century Venezuela. An art critic, art historian, and photographer, he wrote more than 60 publications on the art and historiography of his country…. Newly acquired by the Getty Research Institute, the Boulton archive, ca. 1920-1995, contains his extensive correspondence with local and international artists, institutions, intellectuals, and collectors; his writings for magazines and newspapers, his research materials on pre-Hispanic art, colonial art, the iconography of independence leaders, and modern artists; and a complete vintage collection of his photographic production.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Filling in the Blanks — Researching Georgia Photographers

New-to-me, from the Digital Library of Georgia: Filling in the Blanks — Researching Georgia Photographers. “For my Georgia Photographers Documentation Project, I use many research sources, and my database now has close to 3,700 records, documenting about 2,200 photographers. One of my all-time favorite sources, the DLG’s Georgia Historic Newspapers collection allows me to search for advertisements, notices of formed or dissolved partnerships, and personal information, including obituaries on these photographers and their associates. I also find some wonderful articles about photography itself.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Explore Dorothea Lange’s Iconic Photos With These Online Exhibitions

Smithsonian Magazine: Explore Dorothea Lange’s Iconic Photos With These Online Exhibitions. “Lange’s work documenting the economic downturn was just one chapter in her prolific, four-decade career. Now, two online exhibitions—a newly debuted digital archive from the Oakland Museum of California and a digitized retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City—enable users to explore the full range of Lange’s oeuvre, from her 1957 series on an Oakland public defender to her portraits of wartime shipyard workers and her later snapshots of Irish country life.”

Apollo Magazine: The late Robert Freeman was the Beatles’ favourite photographer – and now his entire archive has been stolen

Apollo Magazine: The late Robert Freeman was the Beatles’ favourite photographer – and now his entire archive has been stolen. “The archive stretched back to Freeman’s work in the early 1960s for the Sunday Times, where he made his name shooting portraits – from Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev to jazz greats such as Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane. His moody monochrome shots of the saxophonist – bebop was rather more to Freeman’s musical taste than pop music – subsequently brought him to the attention of Brian Epstein, manager of a Liverpudlian four-piece who were at that time storming the ‘hit parade’. In short order, Freeman became the Beatles’ most trusted photographer; he travelled with them on tour, discussing music and sharing a room with John Lennon, and was the go-to man for their album-cover portraits.”

Watch the birdie: how a papier-mâché horse in Tbilisi Zoo grew into a popular photo studio (The Calvert Journal)

The Calvert Journal: Watch the birdie: how a papier-mâché horse in Tbilisi Zoo grew into a popular photo studio. “I was born in Tbilisi in the 1980s, back when the country was still a part of the Soviet Union. Visiting the zoo was a special event for me: it meant that I would get a Plombir ice cream, a cup of sparkling gazirovka (a non-alcoholic sparkling beverage), and a ride on an amusement ride adjacent to the premises. But the highlight of the day would always be getting the chance to sit on the papier-mâché horse that looked like it had galloped from a merry-go-round ride. I remember being helped onto the horse, filled with anticipation and excitement at having my photo taken, but also overcome with shyness in front of the photographer.” The author is working with the descendants of the photographer to crowdsource a collection of these images. […]

Cornell Chronicle: Paniccioli’s vast hip-hop photo archive launches online

Cornell Chronicle: Paniccioli’s vast hip-hop photo archive launches online. “Missy Elliott and Li’l Kim dressed up as anime characters, resting between takes on the set of the ‘Sock It 2 Me’ music video. Biz Markie bouncing off his chair in a dressing room of the Apollo Theater. Doug E. Fresh blowing out candles on his birthday cake that’s decorated to look like a vinyl record, as Sean ‘Puff Daddy’ Combs peers over his shoulder. These and nearly 20,000 similar images can now be viewed online as Cornell University Library launches the Ernie Paniccioli Photo Archive, a digital collection chronicling hip-hop music and culture from the 1980s to the early 2000s.”

It’s Nice That: Truthmark is a photography database aiming to stop misuse in fake news

It’s Nice That: Truthmark is a photography database aiming to stop misuse in fake news. “Photographers can upload their images to the database, while retaining copyright, along with written documentation as to the context of the photograph. This is then encrypted together with all the information as one file. Journalists and members of the public who wish to check the authenticity of images can search the database and discover the origin of the photo in more detail than most existing image banks, including the specific context of what’s portrayed.”

United States Golf Association: Historic Howard Schickler Photo Collection Acquired

United States Golf Association: Historic Howard Schickler Photo Collection Acquired. “The collection contains more than 1,000 high-quality, historically and artistically important golf images from the 19th and early 20th century. Many photographs feature top American and British golfers, both men and women, from the mid-1800s to the 1970s. The collection was amassed over decades by collector Howard Schickler, sourced from the collections of some of the game’s most influential figures, including the personal collections of Old Tom Morris and F.G. Tait, the Auchterlonie and the Foulis families, the estate of Billy Burke and the collections of Ed Dudley and Bernard Darwin.”