Trains: Cheseapeake & Ohio Historical society receives slides from J. David Ingles collection

Trains: Cheseapeake & Ohio Historical society receives slides from J. David Ingles collection. “Chesapeake & Ohio Historical Society announced in a press release that it received a collection of slides from the estate of J. David Ingles, the late senior editor of Classic Trains magazine and former editor of Trains magazine. The collection includes many slides from the 1960s and 1970s of the C&O in Ohio and Michigan, Ingles’ birthplace and one-time residence. The historical society is working to scan the approximately 3,000 slides to add to its digital archive.”

Philadelphia Inquirer: Who was the man with the uneven gait? Mystery medical photos come to life with discovery of long-lost Penn archives.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Who was the man with the uneven gait? Mystery medical photos come to life with discovery of long-lost Penn archives.. “He swayed slightly from side to side, his bare feet slapping the ground with each step. Identified only as Rogers, the lanky young man was one of nine neurological patients in a series of sepia-toned ‘electro-photographs,’ captured with novel stop-motion technology in Philadelphia in the summer of 1885. The photographer was Eadweard Muybridge, better known for using his technique to record the movements of galloping horses. His famous images settled a vigorous debate of the Victorian era: whether the animals, at any point in their stride, lift all four hooves off the ground. (They do.) Yet Rogers and the other medical patients in the photos have long been a mystery.”

Asbarez: UCLA Promise Armenian Institute, Armenian Film Foundation Partner to Support Film and Photography Projects

Asbarez: UCLA Promise Armenian Institute, Armenian Film Foundation Partner to Support Film and Photography Projects . “The Promise Armenian Institute announced that it has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Armenian Film Foundation to collaborate on a range of projects that will support Armenian film and photography at the University of California, Los Angeles. On November 18, the Promise Armenian Institute will host ‘Aftermath: the Armenian Earthquake of 1988,’ the first online exhibit of the Armenian Image Archive, which will celebrate the work of Asadour Guzelian.”

Flickr Blog: Partnering with Black Women Photographers to Further Photography

Flickr Blog: Partnering with Black Women Photographers to Further Photography. “Today, we’re excited to officially announce a new grant in partnership with the Black Women Photographers community. With this grant, we hope to help one photographer that is part of both Black Women Photographers and Flickr further their photography practice. The grant includes funds of $1,200 to be used by the recipient towards furthering their photography practice, a two-year Flickr Pro membership, and a one-year SmugMug Pro membership.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

Ohio University: New Digital Collection Shows Breadth of Photographer’s Work

Ohio University: New Digital Collection Shows Breadth of Photographer’s Work. “Lynn Johnson is an award-winning photojournalist who has covered many international issues in her long career. The Lynn Johnson Collection, which was donated by Johnson in 2011, contains material beginning with Johnson’s early work at the Pittsburgh Press through decades of her work as a world-renowned photojournalist, spanning the 1970s into the 2000s. Along with prints, the collection includes film negatives, tear sheets from magazines and other items that add greater context to her work.”

DJ Magazine: Late Electronic Music Photographer Shaun Bloodworth’s Work Celebrated In New Archive

DJ Magazine: Late Electronic Music Photographer Shaun Bloodworth’s Work Celebrated In New Archive. “An archive of photography by the late Shaun Bloodworth is currently in the works. The Shaun Bloodworth Archive, which will take in a website and dedicated Instagram account, will look at work from across the Sheffield photographer’s career, which saw him capture war in the Balkans and the aftermath of Ukraine’s Chernobyl disaster.”

PetaPixel: Glass is a Subscription-Based Photo Sharing App for Photographers

PetaPixel: Glass is a Subscription-Based Photo Sharing App for Photographers. “In the light of Instagram’s recent statement that it is no longer a photo-sharing app, a new photography-focused, subscription-based community app has launched to support the art of photography through a distraction-free experience. Fresh out of its private beta, Glass is live in the App Store, but is currently only available to iOS users.”

New Yorker: A Woman’s Intimate Record of Wyoming in the Early Twentieth Century

New-to-me from New Yorker, discovered via Kottke: A Woman’s Intimate Record of Wyoming in the Early Twentieth Century. “Between 1899 and her death, in 1962, [Lora Webb] Nichols created and collected some twenty-four thousand negatives documenting life in her small Wyoming town, whose fortunes boomed and then busted along with the region’s copper mines. What Nichols left behind might be the largest photographic record of this era and region in existence: thousands of portraits, still-lifes, domestic interiors, and landscapes, all made with an unfussy, straightforward, often humorous eye toward the small textures and gestures of everyday life.” The best word for this photography is “charming.” Absolutely unfussy but so full of detail and life.

LA Weekly: The Jules Bates “Artrouble” Center Sorts Out A Legacy

LA Weekly: The Jules Bates “Artrouble” Center Sorts Out A Legacy. “Before he died at just 27 years old in a motorcycle accident in September 1982, Bates had already achieved more legendary work than many artists make in decades. Now, his family and his alma mater have joined forces to preserve and disseminate his photo archive, as the ArtCenter College of Design gets set to open the Jules Bates ‘Artrouble’ Center this fall, for the benefit of students and the public alike.”

Virginia Gazette: Library wants help finding the faces in the photos of Williamsburg’s first licensed African American photographer

Virginia Gazette: Library wants help finding the faces in the photos of Williamsburg’s first licensed African American photographer. “[Albert] Durant, the first-licensed African American photographer in Williamsburg, photographed life in the area from the late 1930s to the 1960s. Durant documented life from an African American perspective, photographing many sporting, social, school and city events during that time. Now, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library is hoping to fill in some of the blanks in Durant’s photographs. The library is working with the Library of Virginia to provide a digital collection of Durant’s photographs for the public to transcribe.” Currently about 100 photos are available with more on the way.

University of New Mexico: New Maxwell exhibitions examine work of two photographers

University of New Mexico: New Maxwell exhibitions examine work of two photographers. “During a recent exhibitions design class taught by professor Devorah Romanek, curator of exhibits at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at The University of New Mexico, the works of two photographers who chronicled life in New Mexico captured the interest of two graduate students. The class projects, online exhibitions by Katie Conley and Paloma Lopez, are now available on the Maxwell website. They highlight the work of American photographers John Collier Jr. and Charles Fletcher Lummis.”

Vogue: 8 Brilliant Queer Photographers To Follow On Instagram

Vogue: 8 Brilliant Queer Photographers To Follow On Instagram. “As we once again take to the streets (Covid-19 restrictions permitting) for this year’s Pride celebrations to honour our LGBTQIA+ siblings, eight queer photographers share their hopes for the future, from the funding of trans healthcare to the building of new physical safe spaces.” Some of the images in the article would probably be considered NSFW.