BuzzFeed News: The One Place Left On Earth Not Ruled By An Algorithm Is Free To The Public

BuzzFeed News: <a href=”https://news.yahoo.com/photo-collection-revolutionized-way-look-182535520.html”&gt; The One Place Left On Earth Not Ruled By An Algorithm Is Free To The Public</a>. “The picture collection consists of exactly what you might think — visual information from magazines, postcards, clippings, and photographs collected by the New York Public Library’s staff since 1915. From Singapore to silver mining, Oklahoma to olive oil, there’s a folder containing a century’s worth of photographs for nearly everything. For visitors and artists, one of the most appealing things about the Picture Collection is that it’s one of the few spaces left available to us that is untouched by algorithms.”

Oskaloosa Herald: Family photos connect Iowans to history

Oskaloosa Herald: Family photos connect Iowans to history. “[Bettina] Fabos discovered the original Fortepan photo archive in 2013 in Hungary, where she was a Fulbright scholar. The project began when a group of friends in Budapest rescued a discarded box of old photos and decided to post them online in 2010….Fabos brought the idea home to Iowa and created the world’s first Fortepan archive outside of Hungary. Others are in the works in Minnesota, as well as Denmark, Malta, Romania and India.”

Popular Photography: This tool automatically colorizes your black and white photographs

Popular Photography: This tool automatically colorizes your black and white photographs. “According to the creators of the project Algorithmia produced colorized image that lacked intensity, which makes the final product appear inauthentic. The goal of Colourise was to create a program that was specifically trained to colorize old Singaporean photos. The creators did this by training the tool with historical images from Singapore. In contrast, Algorithmia was trained using 1.3 million images from ImageNet, a database often used by researchers at Stanford and Princeton specifically to train AI.”

Unwritten Histories: A Beginner’s Guide to Online Canadian Historical Images

Unwritten Histories: A Beginner’s Guide to Online Canadian Historical Images. “Are you ready for another resource guide? This time I wanted to address the issue of online Canadian historical images. Many of us love to add images to lectures or presentations. However, you’ve likely learned by now that it is really hard to find Canadian historical images online. Google is fantastic, but even if you put the word ‘Canadian’ next to an image search, you’re still going to end up mostly with American images. Unwritten Histories to the rescue!”

CNET: It’s time to take a long, hard look at our Instagram etiquette

CNET: It’s time to take a long, hard look at our Instagram etiquette. “It would be easy to blame Instagram as a platform, but let’s not conflate our own failings with the failings of technology. Technology is imperfect and often deeply flawed, but to make it the scapegoat for all our bad or downright bizarre behavior would be disingenuous. Yes, Instagram, owned by Facebook, has its problems, but the often reckless and selfish lengths we go to to capture a photo? That’s all on us. A few weeks ago, 19-year-old Instagram model Katarina Zarutskie was bitten by a shark while on holiday with her boyfriend’s family in the Bahamas. Zarutskie spotted the sharks in the water — and joined them to grab a quick shot for Instagram.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Rare Irving Berlin WWII Play Photographs Online

State Archives of North Carolina: Rare Irving Berlin WWII Play Photographs Online. “The State Archives of North Carolina’s Military Collection is excited to announce the availability online of 416 original photographs documenting the international tour of American songwriter Irving Berlin’s traveling U.S. Army play This Is The Army was performed from October 1943 through October 1945 during World War II.”

Georgia State University is Crowdfunding to Save Its Photographic Collections

Georgia State University is crowdfunding to preserve its photographic collections. “Our photographic collections are the most heavily used collections by individuals, corporations, organizations, journalists, publishers, and designers. We receive approximately 300 photograph requests annually. By creating an exhibit, we can further promote our extensive collections and share them with the community both in physical and digital form. Fabricating, mounting, promoting, and preservation of photographs for this exhibit will cost us approximately $5,500. Without any foundation funding, corporate, or individual support at a higher level we would not be able to create a compelling exhibit. Help us preserve our collections while sharing them with the public by supporting this campaign.”

Ransom Center Magazine: Remembering photojournalist David Douglas Duncan, 1916–2018

Ransom Center Magazine: Remembering photojournalist David Douglas Duncan, 1916–2018. “The internationally-renowned American photojournalist David Douglas Duncan has died at age 102 in France. As Harry Ransom Center Curator of photography Jessica S. McDonald wrote in a recent tribute, ‘For decades, Americans at home and abroad learned of world events as they unfolded before Duncan’s camera, first during his service as a combat photographer with the United States Marine Corps during World War II, and then through his coverage of the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and conflicts in the Middle East for Life magazine. Delivered to millions of households each week through the illustrated press, Duncan’s photographs have played a profound role in informing the public and shaping history.’” This article links to a gallery of over 600+ of Mr. Duncan’s pictures.

DNA India: Social media pics of culture can predict economic trends in cities, claims new study

DNA India: Social media pics of culture can predict economic trends in cities, claims new study. “The rise and prosperity of an urban neighbourhood may not only be based on economic capital, but also the presence of a vibrant arts, music and science culture, scientists say. In a study published in the journal Frontiers in Physics, the researchers used social media images of cultural events in London and New York City on image hosting site Flickr to create a model that can predict neighbourhoods where residents enjoy a high level of wellbeing.”

Resource Magazine: Natives Photograph Wants To Help You Tell Authentic Indigenous Stories

Resource Magazine: Natives Photograph Wants To Help You Tell Authentic Indigenous Stories . “Today marks the first day in business for Natives Photograph, a database of Indigenous visual journalists. Founded by Josué Rivas, an indigenous photographer himself, and Daniella Zalcman, the founder of Women Photograph, the sites hopes to elevate the work of Indigenous photographers in an effort to ‘balance the way we tell stories about Indigenous people and spaces.’”

Bowery Boogie: 190 Bowery’s Jay Maisel Launches Archival Photo Website

Bowery Boogie: 190 Bowery’s Jay Maisel Launches Archival Photo Website. “According to the media advisory, Maisel reviewed ‘hundreds of thousands of 35mm Kodachrome slides’ from 1954 to 2000, and selected favorites for publication. Many were shot right here on the Bowery, including his home-studio at 190 Bowery.” I found the jazz collection the most striking but all the pictures here are great.

Techradar: Nvidia’s amazing deep learning tool can reconstruct incomplete photos

Techradar: Nvidia’s amazing deep learning tool can reconstruct incomplete photos. “It might look like witchcraft, but researchers at Nvidia have developed an advanced deep learning image-retouching tool that can intelligently reconstruct incomplete photos. While removing unwanted artefacts in image editing is nothing new – Adobe Photoshop’s Content-Aware tools are pretty much the industry standard – the prototype tool that Nvidia is showcasing looks incredibly impressive.”