It’s Nice That: Truthmark is a photography database aiming to stop misuse in fake news

It’s Nice That: Truthmark is a photography database aiming to stop misuse in fake news. “Photographers can upload their images to the database, while retaining copyright, along with written documentation as to the context of the photograph. This is then encrypted together with all the information as one file. Journalists and members of the public who wish to check the authenticity of images can search the database and discover the origin of the photo in more detail than most existing image banks, including the specific context of what’s portrayed.”

How to Use the iPhone Camera App: The Ultimate Guide (How-To Geek)

How-To Geek: How to Use the iPhone Camera App: The Ultimate Guide. “According to Flickr, the iPhone is the most popular camera in the world. Every year, Apple tweaks and improves it, which is one of the most compelling reasons to upgrade to the latest model. To take the best pictures with your iPhone, though, you’ll have to master some basics.”

BBC: Kashmir’s open-air classes offer stunning solution to lockdown

BBC: Kashmir’s open-air classes offer stunning solution to lockdown.”Every morning, students in Doodpathri, a town in Budgam district, walk past streams and bridges, and up the hill to their new classroom: a picturesque spot with the snow-capped Himalayas as a backdrop. The outdoor school is a breather for both parents and children after months of a grinding lockdown to slow down Covid-19 infections. The state has reported more than 19,000 cases and some 365 deaths.” The photography with this article is just stunning.

Mashable: Surreal photos of once-packed locations that are now empty due to the pandemic

Mashable: Surreal photos of once-packed locations that are now empty due to the pandemic. “With coronavirus cases surging in some parts of the United States, institutions like the NBA and Disney World are trying to figure out how to reopen as safely as possible. This often means allowing a fraction of the crowds that were allowed in the Before Times to assure social distancing — which makes for surreal photos of these usually-densely populated places. Here are photos of iconic spots as you’ve likely never seen them.”

Core 77: The Most Instagrammed Train Stations in the World

Core 77: The Most Instagrammed Train Stations in the World. “As an industrial designer in New York City, I commuted through Grand Central Station and never got tired of it. At least once a week, I’d halt my rush and take in some new detail of the ceiling or concourse. I’m not alone in my appreciation. Grand Central Station is the most Instagrammed train station in the world, with some 339,116 IG posts featuring it to date, according to European rail travel website Trainline.”

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon. “Historically, most of the photographs presented in the media have been based on decades-old, low-resolution scans/digitisation. This has been remedied somewhat by efforts to create high-resolution scans of the negatives, although many of the ~35,000 frames from NASA’s Apollo archive at the Johnson Space Center still need work to bring out the detail we all know is stored in those amazing Kodak negatives and slides. This is where Andy Saunders comes in. Over the past few years, Andy has worked tirelessly to remaster both high- and low-resolution scans from NASA’s archive, bringing many 16mm, 35mm and 70mm slides and negatives from the Apollo missions into sharp relief for the first time.” The article called Mr. Saunders’ work “astounding” and that ain’t the half of it.

University of Miami: Take a virtual, photographic journey through Mexico City

University of Miami: Take a virtual, photographic journey through Mexico City. “For as long as he can remember, Sean Black had always wanted to visit Mexico City. And this past Christmas, he finally made his dream come true. ‘Traveling on Christmas Day from Miami, a simple three-hour flight, I immediately set off on my adventure hailing an airport cab and taking a scenic, half-hour drive into one of the many breathtaking neighborhoods of one of North America’s oldest cities,’ said Black, a photography lecturer at the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Art and Art History. His experience touring the vibrant and colorful cosmopolitan city has become the latest online photo exhibition— ‘Mexico City: An Enchanting Trip Through Time’ —at the University’s Wynwood Gallery. “

Thinking outside the Boxing Ring: A Journey through 500 Photos (Getty Iris)

Getty Iris: Thinking outside the Boxing Ring: A Journey through 500 Photos. “It’s a quick moment of action frozen in time. Joey Maxim, World Light Heavyweight Champion, is being knocked to the side, his face contorted from a powerful blow. His opponent, fists raised, can only be seen in profile, making it nearly impossible for me to make out his facial features. This print is one of 534 boxing photographs in the Department of Photographs collection and it was making my job as cataloger difficult. I needed to figure out as much information about this photograph as possible, including when and where it took place, in order to fully catalog it. Joey Maxim’s career spanned nearly twenty years and over 100 fights. Without a name, I wouldn’t be able to place this print.”

Chicago Sun-Times: Lost and Found

Chicago Sun-Times: Lost and Found. “In December 2017, an executive from the Chicago History Museum opened a 30-by-30-foot storage locker in Dixon and found more than 225 containers inside it containing roughly 5 million negative frames from Chicago Sun-Times photographs…. [as of] Friday, 45,000 Sun-Times images are available for the public to view on the museum’s website, and archivists plan to add a few thousand images every month as they scan more negatives. People can purchase copies of these images online under a licensing deal between the Sun-Times and the museum.”

United States Golf Association: Historic Howard Schickler Photo Collection Acquired

United States Golf Association: Historic Howard Schickler Photo Collection Acquired. “The collection contains more than 1,000 high-quality, historically and artistically important golf images from the 19th and early 20th century. Many photographs feature top American and British golfers, both men and women, from the mid-1800s to the 1970s. The collection was amassed over decades by collector Howard Schickler, sourced from the collections of some of the game’s most influential figures, including the personal collections of Old Tom Morris and F.G. Tait, the Auchterlonie and the Foulis families, the estate of Billy Burke and the collections of Ed Dudley and Bernard Darwin.”

British Journal of Photography: Maxim Dondyuk rebuilds a lost archive of life in Chernobyl

British Journal of Photography: Maxim Dondyuk rebuilds a lost archive of life in Chernobyl. “Wandering through one of the thousands of evacuated homes, the photographer discovered piles of postcards, letters, and photographs, hidden beneath 30 years of debris. The Ukranian government considers anything left behind as ‘radioactive trash’, and forbids visitors from removing them from the exclusion zone. But, [Maxim] Dondyuk couldn’t bear to leave the artefacts he found to decay, so over the next two years, he continued to return, disguising himself as a landscape photographer, smuggling the photographs out of the exclusion zone, and rebuilding the lost archives of the families and individuals who once called the region their home.”

Google Blog: A redesigned Google Photos, built for your life’s memories

Google Blog: A redesigned Google Photos, built for your life’s memories. “Google Photos has become more than just an app to manage your photos, it’s become the home for your life’s memories. And that’s why today, we’re launching a redesigned Google Photos, focused on your memories, to help you find and relive your most treasured moments.”

CNET: 3D photos on iOS or Android are now a thing, thanks to this new, free app

CNET: 3D photos on iOS or Android are now a thing, thanks to this new, free app. “After being in beta for months, the 3D photo app LucidPix is now available to iOS and Android users. Whether you have a newer phone like the iPhone 11 or Samsung Galaxy Z Flip or an older one like a Motorola Moto G6 or iPhone 6S, you can use the app take 3D photos. Best of all, you don’t need a special accessory or multiple rear cameras. Instead, LucidPix uses artificial intelligence to render 3D photos that will move as you tilt and pan your phone.”