New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?

New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?. “Do you know where your photos are? Most of us don’t, at least not exactly, or in terms that we fully understand. Holding on to pictures was, for most of the history of photography, a matter of material decay and physical storage. Are these prints fading, and how fast? Are they organized by year or by subject? Do I know where they are? To the people who took them, they were deeply valuable; to anyone else, mostly worthless. Their peculiar sort of pricelessness made archivists of regular people.”

University of Massachusetts Lowell: Event Unveils Digital Archive Celebrating Lowell’s Southeast Asian Communities

University of Massachusetts Lowell: Event Unveils Digital Archive Celebrating Lowell’s Southeast Asian Communities. “The archive is designed to be used by the public, students, teachers, researchers and scholars. In it, users will find documents and oral histories from the Indochinese Refugee Foundation (IRF), a Lowell-based organization active from 1977 through 1985 that helped Southeast Asian immigrants settle in the region in the wake of the Vietnam War and to escape Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. The organization was founded by Hai and Lan Pho, former UMass Lowell faculty, and UMass Lowell Chancellor Jacquie Moloney served as the IRF’s executive director before joining the university. The archive also includes works by photographer James Higgins, who documented the Southeast Asian-American experience and life in Lowell in a series of photo books from 1983 to 1997; the books, now out of print, are available on the new digital platform. Other items in the archive include materials from Lowell’s Angkor Dance Troupe and Burmese community.”

The Guardian: Careful curation is what matters on Instagram – even in the ‘outtakes’

The Guardian: Careful curation is what matters on Instagram – even in the ‘outtakes’. “Instagram influencers: flawless people doing flawless things in flawless places, right? Well, not anymore – or so they would like you to think. Now there is an increasing trend to offer behind-the-scenes glimpses of their “process”, a sort of social media blooper reel. Skateboarder Natalie Hintze this week coupled a typical selfie – bikini-clad, blond hair flowing behind her as she skates beneath a blue sky – with a video of her falling over (or stacking it, in skating parlance) at the bottom of the hill.”

Planetary Society: New Cameras on Mars!

Planetary Society: New Cameras on Mars!. “There was jubilation when InSight landed, but I’m just as happy to be writing about a distinct InSight event: The flow of raw images sent from Mars, straight to the Web, has begun. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has begun sharing images from InSight’s two cameras to the mission website.”

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos . “Hoping that underwater photographers will be moved to contribute their images to form the ultimate marine-life database is a new Spanish-based online platform called the Sealife Collection. The initiative is being run in partnership with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), which ‘provides the taxonomic backbone to the database and daily updates to the taxonomy’, according to Sealife Collection’s Director Bernat Garrigós.”

The Sunday Times: Photographer raises the bar by snapping every Irish pub

The Sunday Times: Photographer raises the bar by snapping every Irish pub. “Leopold Bloom, the fictional protagonist in James Joyce’s Ulysses, mused that a good puzzle would be to ‘cross Dublin without passing a pub’. Far from trying to solve it, one photographer from the city is setting off on a six-year quest to visit and snap every pub in the country.” The article is paywalled, but enough is visible for you to get the salients.

9News: Incredible photos show Brisbane homes in the 1970s

9News: Incredible photos show Brisbane homes in the 1970s. “In the 1960s, a man in a pink Cadillac and a woman in a van cruised Queensland streets, photographing more than 300,000 homes. Frank and Eunice Corely ran a business taking photos and selling the work back to the homeowners as calendars and postcards. The collection was collecting dust in a Brisbane basement, until the Queensland State Library decided to use the photos to create an interactive piece of history.”