Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: UA holds New York Post’s 1.38 million photos; archive dates to 1860s

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: UA holds New York Post’s 1.38 million photos; archive dates to 1860s. “More than a million photographs and negatives spanning the 20th century arrived at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville last month. Dennis T. Clark, dean of libraries, said the trove is the New York Post’s photo archive, which contains a few photos dating back to the 1860s….Clark said the archive was donated in 2017, but the university didn’t take possession of 1.38 million items until early October, when two trucks carrying the 1,492 boxes of photos and negatives arrived on campus.”

University of Arizona: Kennerly Archive Acquired by UA Center for Creative Photography

University of Arizona: Kennerly Archive Acquired by UA Center for Creative Photography. “Spanning more than 50 years of history dating from 1965, the David Hume Kennerly archive features nearly 1 million images, prints, objects, memorabilia, correspondence and documents. It includes iconic portraits of U.S. presidents, world leaders, celebrities and individuals, as well as personal correspondence and mementos such as the helmet and cameras that Kennerly used while photographing the Vietnam War.”

University of Tennessee Knoxville: New Website Catalogs 26 Years of Eyes on LaFollette Photojournalism Project

University of Tennessee Knoxville: New Website Catalogs 26 Years of Eyes on LaFollette Photojournalism Project. “Each spring, professor Rob Heller from UT’s School of Journalism and Electronic Media in the College of Communication and Information takes his advanced photojournalism students to LaFollette, Tennessee, to find and photograph stories in the Campbell County community of 7,000, about 45 miles north of Knoxville…. A new website chronicles the history of the project and the amazing body of work it’s yielded over the years.”

They saw history’: Unseen Pantagraph photos published (The Pantagraph)

The Pantagraph: They saw history’: Unseen Pantagraph photos published. “If a picture is worth a thousand words, Central Illinois has regained hundreds of books’ worth of history. Nearly 37,000 photos, many never before published, taken by Pantagraph photographers in the early part of the 20th century are now available to everyone with an internet connection, digitally restored and preserved for the foreseeable future.”

Emulsive: The Honesty In Film Photography

Emulsive: The Honesty In Film Photography. “When it comes to the idea of honesty I feel there are many different approaches, and that the concept of honest photography is fairly nebulous to begin with. Unless you are a true journalist I don’t think it is always the most important thing to approach subjects with honesty – for example, fine art imagery, landscapes which can use long exposures and filters to manipulate the scene, or fashion where the subject is posed and presented. I think that in documentary photography – especially photojournalism – but to some degree street photography as well, I think that honesty of the image plays a role in the quality and impact of the work.” This is one of those rare articles that unfolded my brain a little bit.

New York Times: How Our Photo Archive Team Has Scanned a Million-Plus Pictures

New York Times: How Our Photo Archive Team Has Scanned a Million-Plus Pictures. “Tucked away in a small, dimly lit room on the second floor of The New York Times’s headquarters, the team tasked with digitizing the newspaper’s vast archive of photographs recently reached a milestone: one million photos scanned.”

Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries acquires the archive of photojournalist David Bacon

Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries acquires the archive of photojournalist David Bacon. “Stanford Libraries has added the work of David Bacon, a Bay Area-based photographer, author, political activist and union organizer, to its photography collection. Bacon has been documenting the lives of farm workers since 1988, and his archive joins a robust and growing collection of photography archives at Stanford.” The collection has not yet been processed, but there are plans to build a digital archive.