Poynter: Who needs deepfakes when bogus crowd photos get thousands of shares on Facebook?

Poynter: Who needs deepfakes when bogus crowd photos get thousands of shares on Facebook?. “In Indonesia, where people are paid to spread deliberately false information about presidential candidates on social media, fact-checkers have been busy debunking similar hoaxes in the lead-up to next week’s election. France 24 reported this week that misinformation has exacerbated religious rifts in Indonesian society. At the same time, a lot of the hoaxes that journalists are going after have to do with crowd size. In the past week, two of the most engaging articles from Liputan 6’s fact-checking team debunked photos that were taken out of context, according to audience metrics tool BuzzSumo.”

SCV News: Budman Donates Vast Signal Photo Archive to Historical Society

SCV News: Budman Donates Vast Signal Photo Archive to Historical Society. “The owner of the Santa Clarita Valley Signal newspaper has donated the entire Signal Photo Archive – an estimated 1 million individual negatives, prints and digital images documenting the goings-on in the SCV from at least the 1960s to the early 2000s – to the nonprofit Santa Clarita Valley Historical Society.” So nice to read about an archive ending up somewhere besides destroyed or in a dumpster.

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website

Shropshire Star: Shropshire photos preserved through Express & Star archive project go live on new website. “About 3,000 images of the history of the industrial past of the Black Country and its surrounding areas have been preserved for future generations… The Express & Star Photographic Collection partnership received a grant from the National Lottery Heritage Fund to produce a website and digitise photographs dating back over the past century.” My knowledge of England’s geography is woeful but the BBC gave me an overview of some opinions on what makes the “Black Country” of England. (like many geographical areas, there are disagreements.)

CNET: Google AI helps NYT get a handle on 5 million photo archive

CNET: Google AI helps NYT get a handle on 5 million photo archive. “Google’s computer brains are helping The New York Times turn a historic archive of more than 5 million photos into digital data that’ll appear in the newspaper’s features about history. The newspaper’s ‘morgue’ has 5 million to 7 million photos dating back to the 1870s, including prints and contact sheets showing all the shots on photographers’ rolls of film. The Times is using Google’s technology to convert it into something more useful than its current analog state occupying banks of filing cabinets.”

Firstpost: Photojournalist TS Satyan’s work gets new lease of life with Bengaluru MAP’s digital archive

Firstpost: Photojournalist TS Satyan’s work gets new lease of life with Bengaluru MAP’s digital archive. “The image as a medium of disseminating or recording information has only gone from strength to strength ever since the camera was invented. The role of the photographer, the once ordained writer of history, though has diminished with time to the point that it now faces a crisis of identity. With a camera in everyone’s hands, who really is a photographer and who isn’t? Though time and technology may have blurred the boundaries of functionality here, back when the photographer was a distinct amalgam of curiousness and glassy tools, his or her eye represented a vision. Aptly then, a collection of photographs captured by one of India’s first photojournalists, TS Satyan, has been brought online by the Bengaluru-based Museum of Art and Photography (MAP), giving Satyan’s work a new lease of life.” I could not find an URL in the article, but you can see at least some of the photos at http://map-india.org/special-collection/the-t-s-satyan-collection/ . These are really arresting. What a beautiful use of light.

VPR: As News Outlets Drop Photographers, Who Will Document Vermont’s Visual Story?

VPR: As News Outlets Drop Photographers, Who Will Document Vermont’s Visual Story?. “Layoffs are not uncommon in the newspaper industry these days, but the recent layoff of a local veteran newspaper photographer seems to indicate another shift in 21st-century journalism — and one that is being felt in Vermont. It was announced last week that Glenn Russell, a veteran staff photographer for the Burlington Free Press, was being laid off. Russell’s work had been appearing in the paper since 1986. As Seven Days noted in their coverage of Russell’s layoff, there were at least five photographers on staff at the Free Press in the 1980s, whereas now just one remains at the paper.”