UC Magazine: Diving deep for data (Marine Biodiversity Photography)

University of Cincinnati Magazine: Diving deep for data. “Paleobiologist David Meyer took his first underwater photograph in 1967, the year he got into diving…. Fifty years later, Meyer has accumulated a library of images documenting marine species around the world to understand the ancient ones from the Ordovician Period 450 million years ago that he studied as a geologist in the McMicken College of Arts and Sciences. Now Meyer is sharing his life’s work with the public in UC’s digital repository for scholarly works, Scholar@UC. He is converting his old photographic slides to digital images for UC’s new Global Marine Biodiversity Archive.” There isn’t a lot in the archive yet, but enough that I’m looking forward to seeing what gets added.

TIME: Twitter Is Full of Fake History Photos. Here’s How to Outsmart Them

TIME: Twitter Is Full of Fake History Photos. Here’s How to Outsmart Them. “The Twitter war between historians and history-photo accounts has been going on for years — but now, as it becomes clearer than ever that inaccurate information floating around on Twitter can affect the course of world events, the battle has taken on new importance.”

Victoria Cross Recipients: First World War now on Flickr (Library and Archives Canada)

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Victoria Cross Recipients: First World War now on Flickr. “The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest military decoration in the Commonwealth and takes precedence over all other medals, decorations and orders. A recognition of valour in the face of the enemy, the VC can be awarded to a person of any rank of military service and to civilians under military command. So far, 98 Canadians have been awarded the Victoria Cross, beginning with Alexander Roberts Dunn who in 1854 fought in the Battle of Balaclava in the Crimean War. The Victoria Crosses were awarded to 71 Canadian soldiers during the First World War, and 16 were awarded during the Second World War.”

National Fairgrounds and Circus Archive’s Image Collection is Digitized and Online

The National Fairgrounds and Circus Archive has digitized its image collection and put it online (this link is to a Facebook post.) There are over 76,000 images available and cover everything from buildings and sideshow people to animals and rides. The images start in the 19th century, looks like, and keep going. I want to find time to browse this.

Gizmodo: Instagram Stories Now Lets You Post Old Photos Without a Workaround

Gizmodo: Instagram Stories Now Lets You Post Old Photos Without a Workaround. “I have an evening routine where I lay in my bed, tapping from Instagram story to Instagram story, mindlessly consuming what feels like a mundane montage of all of my friends’ days. That’s because, up until today, users were limited to posting photos and videos from within the last 24 hours. But now, Instagram has updated the feature to let you go wild from your camera roll. No more limitations, no more tediously bypassing the rules by screenshotting an image or editing its metadata. Time is meaningless, baby.”

The Next Web: This site uses machine learning to enhance your low-res photos for free

The Next Web: This site uses machine learning to enhance your low-res photos for free. “We’ve recently seen a number of interesting approaches to improving low-resolution images using machine learning, including ones from researchers at Google, and at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems. Now, you can try an AI-powered enhancing tool for yourself with just a couple of clicks.”

Digital Trends: The best place to print photos online, from budget-friendly to gallery quality

Digital Trends: The best place to print photos online, from budget-friendly to gallery quality. “Photographs deserve to exist in more than just digital pixels. But sometimes details get lost in translation from digital to print, spitting out prints with weird colors, fuzzy details, unexpected borders, and horrible customer service. So what’s the best place to print photos online? We’ve rounded up the options from personal experience, pro photographer recommendations, and web reviews to put together our seven favorite photo printers, from online to in-person.”