ZDNet: Facebook bug exposed private photos of 6.8 million users

ZDNet: Facebook bug exposed private photos of 6.8 million users. “Facebook announced today another security incident affecting millions of its customers. This time, the company said that a bug in one of its APIs exposed the private photos of nearly 6.8 million users. Facebook blamed this new leak on a Photo API bug that was present in its backend code between September 13 to September 25, 2018.”

Getty Iris: Ottoman-Era Photographs Take on New Meaning in Their Digital Life

Getty Iris: Ottoman-Era Photographs Take on New Meaning in Their Digital Life. “In the 1980s the French collector Pierre de Gigord traveled to Turkey and collected thousands of Ottoman-era photographs in a variety of media and formats. The resulting Pierre de Gigord Collection is now housed in the Getty Research Institute, which recently digitized over 12,000 of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs, making them available to study and download for free online.”

New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?

New York Times: It’s Almost 2019. Do You Know Where Your Photos Are?. “Do you know where your photos are? Most of us don’t, at least not exactly, or in terms that we fully understand. Holding on to pictures was, for most of the history of photography, a matter of material decay and physical storage. Are these prints fading, and how fast? Are they organized by year or by subject? Do I know where they are? To the people who took them, they were deeply valuable; to anyone else, mostly worthless. Their peculiar sort of pricelessness made archivists of regular people.”

University of Massachusetts Lowell: Event Unveils Digital Archive Celebrating Lowell’s Southeast Asian Communities

University of Massachusetts Lowell: Event Unveils Digital Archive Celebrating Lowell’s Southeast Asian Communities. “The archive is designed to be used by the public, students, teachers, researchers and scholars. In it, users will find documents and oral histories from the Indochinese Refugee Foundation (IRF), a Lowell-based organization active from 1977 through 1985 that helped Southeast Asian immigrants settle in the region in the wake of the Vietnam War and to escape Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge regime. The organization was founded by Hai and Lan Pho, former UMass Lowell faculty, and UMass Lowell Chancellor Jacquie Moloney served as the IRF’s executive director before joining the university. The archive also includes works by photographer James Higgins, who documented the Southeast Asian-American experience and life in Lowell in a series of photo books from 1983 to 1997; the books, now out of print, are available on the new digital platform. Other items in the archive include materials from Lowell’s Angkor Dance Troupe and Burmese community.”

The Guardian: Careful curation is what matters on Instagram – even in the ‘outtakes’

The Guardian: Careful curation is what matters on Instagram – even in the ‘outtakes’. “Instagram influencers: flawless people doing flawless things in flawless places, right? Well, not anymore – or so they would like you to think. Now there is an increasing trend to offer behind-the-scenes glimpses of their “process”, a sort of social media blooper reel. Skateboarder Natalie Hintze this week coupled a typical selfie – bikini-clad, blond hair flowing behind her as she skates beneath a blue sky – with a video of her falling over (or stacking it, in skating parlance) at the bottom of the hill.”

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos

DiverNet: Sealife Collection Wants Your Photos . “Hoping that underwater photographers will be moved to contribute their images to form the ultimate marine-life database is a new Spanish-based online platform called the Sealife Collection. The initiative is being run in partnership with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), which ‘provides the taxonomic backbone to the database and daily updates to the taxonomy’, according to Sealife Collection’s Director Bernat Garrigós.”