Sports Collectors Daily: Lelands Acquires Brown Brothers Photo Archive

Sports Collectors Daily: Lelands Acquires Brown Brothers Photo Archive. “A well-known photography archive, with roots in the early 20th century, has been acquired by Lelands. The company has acquired the archives of Brown Brothers, recognized as the most comprehensive American stock photo library covering events of the 20th century. Included are images of some of the most famous athletes in American history.”

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’. “A Bradford boy’s pictures depicting ‘a side of life that has disappeared’ from the city have gone online. The exhibition, called Lad Wi’ Camera, shows the early photographs of Christopher Pratt, who was born in the city in 1888. He started to take pictures in about 1900 when he would have been aged 12.” Surprisingly good photography, especially for a early 20th century kid.

The Calvert Journal: A digital photo archive shows everyday life in 20th-century Romania

The Calvert Journal: A digital photo archive shows everyday life in 20th-century Romania. “A curatorial collective has started to digitise one of Romania’s few historical photographic archives. The collection belongs to Mihai Oroveanu (1946-2013), an art historian and photographer who worked as the director of Romania’s National Museum of Contemporary Art between 2001-2013.”

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard. “The website, designed by Stamen Design working with Getty Digital, allows users to ‘drive’ down Sunset Boulevard in 12 different years between 1965 and 2007, as well as to view, search, and compare the more than 65,000 photographs of this key urban artery.”

6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s

6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s. “Nonprofit advocacy and educational organization Village Preservation is well known for many things, one of which is its historic image archive. Their newest addition is the Jean Polacheck Collection, which dates largely from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, and includes scenes of Washington Square Park, the interior of clubs and restaurants, and other NYC street scenes.”

Northern Arizona University: Martin-Springer Institute’s new online exhibit shows World War II Europe from a GI’s view

Northern Arizona University: Martin-Springer Institute’s new online exhibit shows World War II Europe from a GI’s view. “James Kuykendall was an amateur photographer who documented his 1942-46 tour through southwest Germany and other Nazi-occupied territories in more than 500 pictures. The collection came to the Martin-Springer Institute after Carol Wittmeier, a physical therapist then living in California, heard that Kuykendall’s descendants were unsure of what to do with the photographs and were considering throwing them out.”

Gizmodo: A New Tool for Detecting Deepfakes Looks for What Isn’t There: an Invisible Pulse

Gizmodo: A New Tool for Detecting Deepfakes Looks for What Isn’t There: an Invisible Pulse. “In the endlessly escalating war between those striving to create flawless deepfake videos and those developing automated tools that make them easy to spot, the latter camp has found a very clever way to expose videos that have been digitally modified by looking for literal signs of life: a person’s heartbeat.”

UC Santa Cruz: UCSC publishes online collection of 10,000 photos documenting over a century of Santa Cruz history

UC Santa Cruz: UCSC publishes online collection of 10,000 photos documenting over a century of Santa Cruz history. “The University Library at UC Santa Cruz announced today the online publication of the Santa Cruz County Historic Photograph Collection. Consisting of more than 10,000 images, the collection documents over a century of Santa Cruz County history, featuring original photographs and copy prints from 1866 to 1995.”

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute

Getty Iris: Archive of Venezuelan Intellectual and Photographer Alfredo Boulton Comes to the Getty Research Institute. “Photographer Alfredo Boulton, who lived from 1908 to 1995, was a champion of modern art in Latin America and a key intellectual in 20th-century Venezuela. An art critic, art historian, and photographer, he wrote more than 60 publications on the art and historiography of his country…. Newly acquired by the Getty Research Institute, the Boulton archive, ca. 1920-1995, contains his extensive correspondence with local and international artists, institutions, intellectuals, and collectors; his writings for magazines and newspapers, his research materials on pre-Hispanic art, colonial art, the iconography of independence leaders, and modern artists; and a complete vintage collection of his photographic production.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Filling in the Blanks — Researching Georgia Photographers

New-to-me, from the Digital Library of Georgia: Filling in the Blanks — Researching Georgia Photographers. “For my Georgia Photographers Documentation Project, I use many research sources, and my database now has close to 3,700 records, documenting about 2,200 photographers. One of my all-time favorite sources, the DLG’s Georgia Historic Newspapers collection allows me to search for advertisements, notices of formed or dissolved partnerships, and personal information, including obituaries on these photographers and their associates. I also find some wonderful articles about photography itself.”

University of Illinois at Chicago: Alkebuluan Merriweather (BA, 2019) launches Black Matriarch Archive

University of Illinois at Chicago: Alkebuluan Merriweather (BA, 2019) launches Black Matriarch Archive . “Alumna Alkebuluan Merriweather (BA, 2019) has launched a digital platform titled Black Matriarch Archive. Black Matriarch Archive is a digital platform and archive that seeks to encourage members of the African diaspora to submit images and video documentation of black elders, whether they may be grandmothers, great-aunts, godmothers, or caregivers.” This is a project that uses Instagram as its platform. It’s early days.

Russia Beyond: INSIDE the cockpits of legendary Soviet planes (PHOTOS)

Russia Beyond: INSIDE the cockpits of legendary Soviet planes (PHOTOS). “Many people dream of sitting in the cockpit of a plane. But what about the cockpit of historical aircraft? Now it’s possible even online thanks to Sasha Gentsis’ ‘Ruling the Skies’ photo project. Gentsis took some incredible shots of the inside of rare aircraft from the collection of the Central Museum of the Russian Air Force.”

9to5 Google: Google Takeout now lets you select Photos albums for direct Flickr, OneDrive transfer

9to5 Google: Google Takeout now lets you select Photos albums for direct Flickr, OneDrive transfer. “Google Takeout has long let users export and download local copies of their data. With the Data Transfer Project, Google made it so that you could directly move an image library to a third-party service. Google Takeout now lets you select specific Photos albums to transfer.”

SeaCoastOnline: UMaine marine geologist archives change in Maine landscapes

SeaCoastOnline: UMaine marine geologist archives change in Maine landscapes. “Every year since 1982, Joseph Kelley captured photos of the fastest deteriorating portion of Maine’s coast, located in Camp Ellis, for use in his work as a state marine geologist, and research and teaching at the University of Maine. Later this fall, the public will have the opportunity to view decades of geologic transformation captured in the images taken of the Saco-area shoreline, as well as thousands of others depicting dramatic changes in Maine’s coastal vistas.”

Humanities Commons: Passenger Pigeon Manifesto

Humanities Commons: Passenger Pigeon Manifesto. “Even though most of our tangible cultural heritage has not been digitised yet, a process greatly hindered by the lack of resources for professionals, we could already have much to look at online. In reality, a significant portion of already digitised historical photos is not available freely to the public – despite being in the public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium sized previews scattered throughout numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct. The knowledge and efforts of these institutions are crucial in tending our cultural landscape but they cannot become prisons to our history. Instead of claiming ownership, their task is to provide unrestricted access and free use. Cultural heritage should not be accessible only for those who can afford paying for it.”