NASA: NASA Selects 5 Proposals to Provide New Insights from Openly Available Data in the Physical Sciences Informatics System

NASA: NASA Selects 5 Proposals to Provide New Insights from Openly Available Data in the Physical Sciences Informatics System. “Researchers will investigate important problems with existing data from NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics (PSI) system. The online database contains data from completed physical science reduced-gravity flight experiments conducted on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle flights, free flying spacecraft, commercial cargo flights to and from the space station, or from related ground-based studies.”

University of California, Riverside: Using physics to explain the transmission effects of different SARS-CoV-2 mutations

University of California, Riverside: Using physics to explain the transmission effects of different SARS-CoV-2 mutations. “During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, multiple new and more transmissible variants of the virus have emerged. Understanding how specific mutations affect SARS-CoV-2 transmission could help us to better understand the biology of the virus and to control outbreaks. This, however, is a challenging task, said John Barton, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California, Riverside, who is presenting results from his research titled ‘Inferring the Effects of Mutations on SARS-CoV-2 Transmission From Genomic Surveillance Data’ at the American Physical Society’s March Meeting.”

IOP Publishing: ResearchGate and IOP Publishing partner to increase the visibility of academic content

IOP Publishing: ResearchGate and IOP Publishing partner to increase the visibility of academic content. IOP Publishing is the publishing arm of the Institute of Physics. “ResearchGate and IOP Publishing (IOPP) today announce a new collaboration agreement to explore ways to support the scientific community through syndication of IOPP peer reviewed scholarly content on ResearchGate’s platform…. The agreement – which marks the first time a physics society publisher has made its content available on the platform – will initially run for 12 months. Over 36,000 full text articles will be uploaded from open-access (OA) journals Environmental Research Letters, Materials Research Express and New Journal of Physics and hybrid journals Biomedical Materials, Classical Quantum Gravity, Physica Scripta and J Phys B.”

VentureBeat: What 1000-X faster simulation means for digital twins

I’m seeing the term “digital twin” a lot, so I went looking for a good explainer article. This particular article focuses more physics, but I’ve seen the digital twin concept used for optimizing a ski resort’s busy season and improve business and manufacturing processes. VentureBeat: What 1000-X faster simulation means for digital twins. “A digital twin is a virtual representation of an object or system that spans its lifecycle, is updated from real-time data, and uses simulation, machine learning, and reasoning to help decision-making. Connected sensors on the physical asset collect data that can be mapped onto the virtual model.”

The Next Web: Research indicates the whole universe could be a giant neural network

The Next Web: Research indicates the whole universe could be a giant neural network. “Vitaly Vanchurin, a professor of physics at the University of Minnesota Duluth, published an incredible paper last August entitled ‘The World as a Neural Network’ on the arXiv pre-print server. It managed to slide past our notice until today when Futurism’s Victor Tangermann published an interview with Vanchurin discussing the paper.”

Stanford University: Stanford physicists help create time crystals with quantum computers

Stanford University: Stanford physicists help create time crystals with quantum computers. “Just as a crystal’s structure repeats in space, a time crystal repeats in time and, importantly, does so infinitely and without any further input of energy – like a clock that runs forever without any batteries. The quest to realize this phase of matter has been a longstanding challenge in theory and experiment – one that has now finally come to fruition.”

University of Delaware: New Atomic Data Portal

University of Delaware: New Atomic Data Portal. “Even if you’re one of the most precise physicists on the planet — as University of Delaware Professor Marianna Safronova is — you still will need collaborators whose skills complement your own and make new opportunities possible. You will need someone such as UD Professor Rudolf Eigenmann, who can take that precision, add generous amounts of computer science expertise and help to make that high-value information available to any other physicist who wants it. A project led by Safronova and Eigenmann and supported by the National Science Foundation has done just that, producing a Portal for High-Precision Atomic Data and Computation that provides extraordinary information about atomic properties in user-friendly ways. It’s the periodic table on steroids and it is already drawing keen interest from researchers who need to know the nitty-gritty details of the materials they work with.”

MEDIA ADVISORY: Physics Digital Images Available for Free from AIP Niels Bohr Library & Archives (American Institute of Physics)

American Institute of Physics: MEDIA ADVISORY: Physics Digital Images Available for Free from AIP Niels Bohr Library & Archives. “Trying to find the right image for a scientific story can be daunting. The American Institute of Physics’ Niels Bohr Library & Archives is making it easier to locate that visual impact for a news piece. More than 28,000 digital images from the Emilio Segrè Visual Archives are available for free to anyone who is searching for historic images of labs and researchers, headshots, and candid photos of physical scientists with their co-workers, families, and friends. The new, searchable location of the photos also houses manuscripts, publications, audiovisual materials, and more from the Niels Bohr Library & Archives.”

Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics: Biard Lecture 2021 – Katie Mack (NCSU) “Physics at the End of the Universe”

Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics: Biard Lecture 2021 – Katie Mack (NCSU) “Physics at the End of the Universe”. “The Big Bang theory tells the story of the beginning of the Universe, our cosmic home for the last 13.8 billion years. But what is the story of its end? I’ll share what modern astrophysics tells us about the ultimate fate of the cosmos, and what each possibility would entail if there were people there to see it. ‘The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking)’ is an accessible journey to the end of time, exploring five possible fates of the universe and how physicists are investigating our cosmic future.”

IceCube Neutrino Observatory: 10 years of IceCube data now publicly available at NASA’s HEASARC archive

IceCube Neutrino Observatory: 10 years of IceCube data now publicly available at NASA’s HEASARC archive. “The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is an enormous neutrino detector that comprises 5,160 light sensors attached to 86 bundles of cable (called ‘strings’) that are buried in a cubic kilometer of ice a mile below the surface at the South Pole. A cooperative effort of the international IceCube Collaboration, its purpose is to detect astrophysical neutrinos: elusive, lightweight particles that are created by the most energetic phenomena in the universe.”

Caltech: Albert Einstein at 50

Caltech: Albert Einstein at 50 . “The Einstein Papers Project at Caltech has released the 16th volume of its massive scholarly collection of Albert Einstein’s scientific and nonscientific writings and correspondence. The volume covers the period from June 1927 to May 1929 and contains 1,600 letters by and to Einstein, many more than contained in previous volumes. This is due in part to the fact that Einstein turned 50 on March 14, 1929 and received a flood of congratulatory wishes.”