BuzzFeed: A Marketing Site Deleted Over 7,000 Articles After It Was Caught Stealing Fact-Checks And Plagiarizing

BuzzFeed: A Marketing Site Deleted Over 7,000 Articles After It Was Caught Stealing Fact-Checks And Plagiarizing. “Since at least November 2016, [Shawn] Rice has written thousands of articles about hoaxes for business2community.com, a business and marketing blog. His quick, formulaic debunks appeared high on the first page of Google search results and in Google News. He was the site’s most frequent contributor and recently scored its biggest hit on Facebook of the past two years with a debunk of a fake story about Netflix picking up the recently canceled TV series Roseanne, according to data from social tracking tool BuzzSumo. Rice’s story generated over 80,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook. But last night close to 6,000 of Rice’s more than 7,200 articles were suddenly deleted — including all of his debunks. And Rice’s remaining stories were deleted after this story was published.”

Syracuse University News: Acuna and Team Create Tool to Detect Academic Fraud in Research Papers

Syracuse University News: Acuna and Team Create Tool to Detect Academic Fraud in Research Papers. “For academic journal editors and research integrity officers at post-secondary institutions, detecting the re-use of images and illustrations in academic papers can be a time-consuming, if not impossible, task. While resources for detecting similarities and plagiarism in text submissions have been in use for several years, up until now there has been no technological solution that could be applied to finding duplicate images across research literature. That may soon change, thanks to work done by School of Information Studies (iSchool) Assistant Professor Daniel Acuna.”

BuzzFeed: Twitter Just Suspended A Ton Of Accounts Known For Stealing Tweets

BuzzFeed: Twitter Just Suspended A Ton Of Accounts Known For Stealing Tweets. “@Dory, @GirlPosts, @SoDamnTrue, Girl Code/@reiatabie, Common White Girl/@commonwhitegiri, @teenagernotes, @finah, @holyfag, and @memeprovider were among the accounts that got swept up in the purge. Many of these accounts were hugely popular, with hundreds of thousands or even millions of followers.”

Lifehacker: Detect Plagiarism With the Help of This Friendly AI Bot

Lifehacker: Detect Plagiarism With the Help of This Friendly AI Bot. “The next literary hit to bear the same name as Jane Austen’s 200-year-old masterpiece Emma isn’t a book at all, but a thoroughly modern AI. This Emma — formally Emma Identity — the creation of computer science professor Aleksandr Marchenko, is the world’s first publicly available authorship identification web app. Give her at least 5,000 words of a written piece, and she’ll use more than 50 math parameters to figure out who wrote the lines.”

Crossword Puzzle Database Leads to Crossword Scandal

I’ll just file this under “unexpected uses for databases” – a guy named Saul Pwanson created a database of crossword puzzles, people started looking at it, and all of a sudden there’s a plagiarism scandal in crossword world. “A group of eagle-eyed puzzlers, using digital tools, has uncovered a pattern of copying in the professional crossword-puzzle world that has led to accusations of plagiarism and false identity. Since 1999, Timothy Parker, editor of one of the nation’s most widely syndicated crosswords, has edited more than 60 individual puzzles that copy elements from New York Times puzzles, often with pseudonyms for bylines, a new database has helped reveal. The puzzles in question repeated themes, answers, grids and clues from Times puzzles published years earlier. Hundreds more of the puzzles edited by Parker are nearly verbatim copies of previous puzzles that Parker also edited.”