Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers

Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers. “One of the biggest environmental disasters that needs to be addressed ASAP is the immense plastic pollution in the oceans. According to the nonprofit organization The Ocean Cleanup Project, the best way to do this is to tackle the incoming plastics at their source: rivers along coasts. With a new tool, the nonprofit allows people to see the 1,000 most-polluting rivers in the world; ones it aims to purify with its autonomous, plastic-collecting drone ships.”

Duke University: New Webpage Highlights 52 Technologies to Fight Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans

This is from November, but I just found it and it’s so cool I’m exceptioning it in. Duke University: New Webpage Highlights 52 Technologies to Fight Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans. “Duke University researchers have created a new online resource designed to help local governments, conservation groups, businesses and other stakeholders identify the best technologies to clean up plastic pollution in our oceans or prevent it from getting there in the first place. The Plastic Pollution Prevention and Collection Technology Inventory includes 52 different technologies, from solar-powered catamarans that use conveyor belts to scoop up floating debris, to underwater bubble tubes that force submerged bits of plastic to the surface where they can more easily be collected.”

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools . The BPF is the British Plastics Federation. “The new online resource includes numerous design guides for making plastic packaging more recyclable, guides for incorporating recycled content in products, general guides about sustainability, as well as interactive tools such as carbon calculators. The searchable database presents a wealth of insight into plastic packaging design at a variety of technical levels, which can ultimately help to reduce the overall environmental impact of products.”

Mother Jones: Hygiene Theater at Restaurants Is Creating Endless Plastic Waste

Mother Jones: Hygiene Theater at Restaurants Is Creating Endless Plastic Waste. “…it’s not clear exactly how many restaurants have switched to disposables. But extrapolating from pre-pandemic studies of California restaurants, a midsize restaurant with 30 seats went through 17,800 disposable cups and utensils in a year. Multiply that by 520,000—the number of US restaurants that the consulting firm McKinsey estimates survived the COVID-19 shutdowns—and you get more than 9 billion pieces of trash in one year. And bursting landfills aren’t the only problem: The uptick in plastic restaurant waste, advocates point out, will be especially acute in Black and Brown communities.”

i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object

i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object. “To sum up the last seventy years in a single object, you needn’t look further than under your kitchen sink. The humble plastic bag — once an everyday object carelessly picked up, used and disposed and now environmentalism’s public enemy number one — became readily available in the post-war 50s, peaked in the 90s and is slowly disappearing from our streets. As we move from plastic to totes, the significance of these seemingly worthless single-use bags is being archived in a recently opened digital collection, aptly named the Plastic Bag Museum.”

Green Queen: Hydro-Powered Search Engine Ekoru Helps Divert Ocean Waste With Every Browse

Green Queen: Hydro-Powered Search Engine Ekoru Helps Divert Ocean Waste With Every Browse. “Ekoru, a new hydro-electric powered search engine lets you browse the internet while helping clean ocean waste and keeping users’ data private. Founded this year by Australian techie Ati Bakush, Ekoru dedicates 60% of its revenue to climate change charities involved in animal welfare, reforestation and ocean conservation.”

Mashable: The app that went from Instagram trash to cleaning up the world

Mashable: The app that went from Instagram trash to cleaning up the world . “Say hello to Litterati, a free app that both encourages users to pick up litter and to share their efforts with likeminded individuals. But the app does more than just provide a nudge to tidy up. Behind the profile pics, photo galleries, and cheery campaigns announcing participants’ intention to clean up their neighborhoods lies a secret weapon: crowdsourced data.”

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish. “Birds and Debris was set up by Dr Alex Bond, Senior Curator of Birds at the Museum, and collaborators at the Environmental Research Institute at the University of the Highlands and Islands. The website allows people all over the world to report birds endangered by not only plastic but any type of debris, such as glass, fabric and metal.” The image with the story is a graphic one, of a bird with a fishing hook caught in its mouth.