i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object

i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object. “To sum up the last seventy years in a single object, you needn’t look further than under your kitchen sink. The humble plastic bag — once an everyday object carelessly picked up, used and disposed and now environmentalism’s public enemy number one — became readily available in the post-war 50s, peaked in the 90s and is slowly disappearing from our streets. As we move from plastic to totes, the significance of these seemingly worthless single-use bags is being archived in a recently opened digital collection, aptly named the Plastic Bag Museum.”

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish. “Birds and Debris was set up by Dr Alex Bond, Senior Curator of Birds at the Museum, and collaborators at the Environmental Research Institute at the University of the Highlands and Islands. The website allows people all over the world to report birds endangered by not only plastic but any type of debris, such as glass, fabric and metal.” The image with the story is a graphic one, of a bird with a fishing hook caught in its mouth.

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds . “Pictures of birds entangled in plastic and nests built with the waste are being collected by Scottish researchers. They want people from around the world to contribute to the ‘citizen science’ project by uploading their images to a new website.”

Florida International University: Citizen scientists collect vital data on microplastics – from their yachts

Florida International University: Citizen scientists collect vital data on microplastics – from their yachts. “As part of a new collaborative project, dubbed the S.A.R.A.H. initiative, privately owned yachts become platforms for FIU scientists to conduct field research. Special nets are towed behind the vessels to gather samples of plastic debris in the water. They are designed to collect even the tiniest bits of plastic – that can be smaller than a grain of rice – known as microplastics.”

Technical University of Denmark: New collaboration addresses marine plastic pollution

Technical University of Denmark: New collaboration addresses marine plastic pollution. “Plastics in the ocean is one of today’s fastest growing environmental problems. Up to 80% of the world’s waste consists of plastic, and 300 million tons of plastic are discharged to the ocean every year. Researchers from five Danish research institutions, including DTU, are now collaborating to develop knowledge about and solutions to marine plastic pollution. The collaboration takes place within the frame of the MarinePlastic research center, headed by Aalborg University and supported by the Velux Foundation with 20 million DKK.”

New York Times: These Cultural Treasures Are Made of Plastic. Now They’re Falling Apart.

New York Times: These Cultural Treasures Are Made of Plastic. Now They’re Falling Apart.. “Of an estimated 8,300 million metric tons of plastic produced to date, roughly 60 percent is floating in the oceans or stuffed in landfills. Most of us want that plastic to disappear. But in museums, where objects are meant to last forever, plastics are failing the test of time.”