Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers

Nerdist: This Tool Lets You See World’s 1,000 Most-Polluting Rivers. “One of the biggest environmental disasters that needs to be addressed ASAP is the immense plastic pollution in the oceans. According to the nonprofit organization The Ocean Cleanup Project, the best way to do this is to tackle the incoming plastics at their source: rivers along coasts. With a new tool, the nonprofit allows people to see the 1,000 most-polluting rivers in the world; ones it aims to purify with its autonomous, plastic-collecting drone ships.”

Duke University: New Webpage Highlights 52 Technologies to Fight Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans

This is from November, but I just found it and it’s so cool I’m exceptioning it in. Duke University: New Webpage Highlights 52 Technologies to Fight Plastic Pollution in Our Oceans. “Duke University researchers have created a new online resource designed to help local governments, conservation groups, businesses and other stakeholders identify the best technologies to clean up plastic pollution in our oceans or prevent it from getting there in the first place. The Plastic Pollution Prevention and Collection Technology Inventory includes 52 different technologies, from solar-powered catamarans that use conveyor belts to scoop up floating debris, to underwater bubble tubes that force submerged bits of plastic to the surface where they can more easily be collected.”

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools

Packaging Today: BPF Launches Online Database of Sustainable Design Guides and Tools . The BPF is the British Plastics Federation. “The new online resource includes numerous design guides for making plastic packaging more recyclable, guides for incorporating recycled content in products, general guides about sustainability, as well as interactive tools such as carbon calculators. The searchable database presents a wealth of insight into plastic packaging design at a variety of technical levels, which can ultimately help to reduce the overall environmental impact of products.”

Mother Jones: Hygiene Theater at Restaurants Is Creating Endless Plastic Waste

Mother Jones: Hygiene Theater at Restaurants Is Creating Endless Plastic Waste. “…it’s not clear exactly how many restaurants have switched to disposables. But extrapolating from pre-pandemic studies of California restaurants, a midsize restaurant with 30 seats went through 17,800 disposable cups and utensils in a year. Multiply that by 520,000—the number of US restaurants that the consulting firm McKinsey estimates survived the COVID-19 shutdowns—and you get more than 9 billion pieces of trash in one year. And bursting landfills aren’t the only problem: The uptick in plastic restaurant waste, advocates point out, will be especially acute in Black and Brown communities.”

Neowin: Google raises its sustainability goals, will make plastic-free packaging by 2025

Neowin: Google raises its sustainability goals, will make plastic-free packaging by 2025. “Google is stepping up its sustainability game with new goals for its own hardware products, the company announced today. Last year, the search giant had already set some goals in this regard, such as using recycled materials in all of its new products by 2022, but it reached that goal early, as all Pixel and Nest devices released this year use recycled materials to some extent. In that light, Google is setting some more ambitious goals.”

i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object

i-D: The Plastic Bag Museum archiving the disappearing everyday object. “To sum up the last seventy years in a single object, you needn’t look further than under your kitchen sink. The humble plastic bag — once an everyday object carelessly picked up, used and disposed and now environmentalism’s public enemy number one — became readily available in the post-war 50s, peaked in the 90s and is slowly disappearing from our streets. As we move from plastic to totes, the significance of these seemingly worthless single-use bags is being archived in a recently opened digital collection, aptly named the Plastic Bag Museum.”

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish

Natural History Museum: Where to report birds tangled in plastic rubbish. “Birds and Debris was set up by Dr Alex Bond, Senior Curator of Birds at the Museum, and collaborators at the Environmental Research Institute at the University of the Highlands and Islands. The website allows people all over the world to report birds endangered by not only plastic but any type of debris, such as glass, fabric and metal.” The image with the story is a graphic one, of a bird with a fishing hook caught in its mouth.

Florida International University: Citizen scientists collect vital data on microplastics – from their yachts

Florida International University: Citizen scientists collect vital data on microplastics – from their yachts. “As part of a new collaborative project, dubbed the S.A.R.A.H. initiative, privately owned yachts become platforms for FIU scientists to conduct field research. Special nets are towed behind the vessels to gather samples of plastic debris in the water. They are designed to collect even the tiniest bits of plastic – that can be smaller than a grain of rice – known as microplastics.”

Technical University of Denmark: New collaboration addresses marine plastic pollution

Technical University of Denmark: New collaboration addresses marine plastic pollution. “Plastics in the ocean is one of today’s fastest growing environmental problems. Up to 80% of the world’s waste consists of plastic, and 300 million tons of plastic are discharged to the ocean every year. Researchers from five Danish research institutions, including DTU, are now collaborating to develop knowledge about and solutions to marine plastic pollution. The collaboration takes place within the frame of the MarinePlastic research center, headed by Aalborg University and supported by the Velux Foundation with 20 million DKK.”

New York Times: These Cultural Treasures Are Made of Plastic. Now They’re Falling Apart.

New York Times: These Cultural Treasures Are Made of Plastic. Now They’re Falling Apart.. “Of an estimated 8,300 million metric tons of plastic produced to date, roughly 60 percent is floating in the oceans or stuffed in landfills. Most of us want that plastic to disappear. But in museums, where objects are meant to last forever, plastics are failing the test of time.”