National Post: Vast digital trove of off-the-cuff remarks from Canadian literary lions nears completion

National Post: Vast digital trove of off-the-cuff remarks from Canadian literary lions nears completion. “After six years of work, SpokenWeb is in its final year. When it’s done in early 2024, students can study writers’ remarks, scholars can track changes in the performance of a particular piece and literature lovers can savour their favourite works in the voices of those who penned them — all from a single, searchable online portal.”

Jamaica Gleaner: Digital archive to shake up access to, understanding of Jamaican poetry

Jamaica Gleaner: Digital archive to shake up access to, understanding of Jamaican poetry. “[The digital Jamaica Poetry Archive] will serve as a vital educational resource for students studying literature, Jamaican culture, and related fields. It will provide access to audio recordings of poets reciting their works, allowing students to engage with the nuances of pronunciation, rhythm, and emotion that make poetry a living, breathing art form.” The archive is available but I think it’s still growing.

Washington University in St. Louis: New Grant to Preserve Born-Digital Poetry

Washington University in St. Louis: New Grant to Preserve Born-Digital Poetry. “The Washington University Libraries were awarded a two-year grant by the Mellon Foundation to support an exploration of essential questions surrounding the acquisition, discoverability, preservation, and use of born-digital poetry collections. The $250,000 award will enable the University Libraries to develop online resources and systems to process, preserve, and steward the collections of a new generation of digital-native poets.”

Cornell Chronicle: Website sheds light on 19th century Black literary culture

Cornell Chronicle: Website sheds light on 19th century Black literary culture. “The site includes 700 poems [Charline] Jao discovered and transcribed from periodicals managed by Black editors in New York City. The site is searchable by publication, title, description, author and other parameters. The website also includes collections of poems focused on themes — from deaths and elegies to hymns and songs to British poets and women poets. Another section showcases a large collection of online and textual resources.”

University of Delaware: Mellon Foundation grant supports UD Library project focused on 20th-century poet-activists of color

University of Delaware: Mellon Foundation grant supports UD Library project focused on 20th-century poet-activists of color. “The University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press was recently awarded a $250,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation to support the curation and stewardship of poetry archives related to 20th-century poet-activists of color along with a digital publishing and poet-in-residence project that draws on these collections.”

University of Stirling: Burns’ influence on working class English writers revealed after the discovery of ‘lost’ works

University of Stirling: Burns’ influence on working class English writers revealed after the discovery of ‘lost’ works. “The influence of Robert Burns saw poets in the north of England writing verse in Scots, say researchers who have uncovered a host of ‘lost’ literary works penned by industrial workers in the 19th Century. The team, led by Professor Kirstie Blair of the University of Stirling, has discovered a deluge of poems, songs and short stories penned by navvies, shipbuilders, railwaymen, factory workers and miners, from Scotland and the north of England, which give unique, first-hand accounts of their lives in the late 1800s and early 1900s.”

Honolulu: Hawaii’s new poet laureate finds solace in verse

Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Hawaii’s new poet laureate finds solace in verse. “Hawaii’s new poet laureate, Brandy Nalani McDougall, sees poetry as a way to heal…. As poet laureate, she will spend the next three years encouraging the people of Hawaii to follow her on that path of healing…. She also plans to launch an indexed online archive for poets to post their own poetry.”

Boing Boing: Literary Hub has an 90s style “Mathblaster” game based on Emily Dickinson

Boing Boing: Literary Hub has an 90s style “Mathblaster” game based on Emily Dickinson. “Literary Hub’s new game ‘EmilyBlaster’ could be the most engaging way to make students that are interfacing with Emily Dickinson’s work for the first time view the classic poems in a new light. Although the potential for enticing students to read Emily Dickinson exists, the game was actually created to serve as a tie-in to the novel Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin.”

Library of Congress: Library to Celebrate Joy Harjo’s Three Terms as U.S. Poet Laureate with Reading, Dance Party and Retreat

Library of Congress: Library to Celebrate Joy Harjo’s Three Terms as U.S. Poet Laureate with Reading, Dance Party and Retreat. “The Library of Congress will celebrate Joy Harjo, the first Native American U.S. poet laureate, as her three terms in the position come to a conclusion with two public programs at the end of April.” The closing event takes place tomorrow night (Thursday, April 28) and will be livestreamed.

Iran Human Rights Monitor: Jailed Iranian poet Baktash Abtin dies due to lack of timely medical care for Covid-19

Iran Human Rights Monitor: Jailed Iranian poet Baktash Abtin dies due to lack of timely medical care for Covid-19. “Baktash Abtin, a member of Iran’s Writer’s Association died today in a Tehran hospital after catching COVID-19 in Evin Prison. Baktash Abtin, 48, was put into an induced coma in a Tehran hospital after being rushed there from Evin Prison on December 14 with severe symptoms of COVID-19.”

Library of Congress: Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo and New Resources from the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo and New Resources from the Library of Congress. “‘Living Nations, Living Words’ is Harjo’s signature project as U.S. Poet Laureate. With an emphasis on poetry, and sharing and elevating the voices of living Native poets, the project consists of two main components: a story map and a poetry collection. Together, they present works by 47 Native poets that explore the themes of place and displacement, as well as the ‘touchpoints’ of persistence, resistance, acknowledgment and visibility.”

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life

University of Connecticut: History Professor Uncovers Missing Parts of a Prominent Life. “Cornelia Dayton, a professor of history at UConn, has helped uncover some missing pieces in the life story of Phillis Wheatley, author of the first volume of poetry published by an African American. In a prize-winning research paper recently published in the New England Quarterly, Dayton describes her findings on the later parts of Wheatley’s life.” A Web site showcasing the research is underway.