Miami New Times: New Database Lets You Search Miami Police Officer Complaints

Miami New Times: New Database Lets You Search Miami Police Officer Complaints. “After talking to the sister of a woman who had a traumatic run-in with Miami police during a June protest, a light bulb went on for WLRN reporter Danny Rivero. Rivero had the name of the woman’s arresting officer and could easily access records that listed his record of complaints, suspensions, and reprimands. But he figured the public might not have the same familiarity with police records, so he set out to create a tool to make that information more accessible. Yesterday, Rivero announced the beta launch of Badge Watch, a website and soon-to-be app that keeps track of use-of-force incidents and citizen complaints against City of Miami police officers.”

CNN: Thousands of NYPD discipline records published by New York Civil Liberties Union after court order is lifted

CNN: Thousands of NYPD discipline records published by New York Civil Liberties Union after court order is lifted. “The second circuit court of appeals lifted the order that was put on the NYCLU to not publish the records it had obtained from the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), the city agency charged with oversight of the NYPD, after a New York State law was repealed that prevented discipline records from being released. Within minutes of the denial, the NYCLU’s database went live with what it says has 35 years of data and over 300,000 complaints against over 81,000 NYPD officers.”

ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades

ProPublica: We’re Publishing Thousands of Police Discipline Records That New York Kept Secret for Decades. “In releasing the information included in our database, ProPublica is not publishing all complaints against officers. As we’ve noted, we’ve limited the data to only those officers who’ve had at least one substantiated allegation. And every complaint in the database was fully investigated by the CCRB, which means, among other steps, a civilian provided a sworn statement to investigators. We’ve also excluded any allegations that investigators concluded were unfounded, meaning investigators determined the incident did not happen as the complainant alleged. There were about 3,200 allegations listed as unfounded in the data we were provided, about 9% of the total.”

KOBI: Oregon releases new, online database showing police misconduct

KOBI: Oregon releases new, online database showing police misconduct. “A new database is now available showing Oregon law enforcement officers’ suspensions, open investigations, and who has lost their badge. It comes in the wake of George Floyd’s death and the passage of House Bill 4207 in the legislature in recent weeks.”

Mashable: Amnesty International creates a map of where police brutality occurred during police brutality protests

Mashable: Amnesty International creates a map of where police brutality occurred during police brutality protests. “Released on Tuesday, the map documents 125 separate instances of police violence against protesters occurring between May 26 and June 5. With incidents recorded in 40 states as well as the District of Columbia, Amnesty International claims it is the most comprehensive human rights analysis of police violence against protesters to date.”

KOB4: NYC to give greater access to police disciplinary records

KOB4: NYC to give greater access to police disciplinary records. “In his latest push for police reform, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday that the city is launching an online database that will let New Yorkers track disciplinary cases against police officers accused of excessive force and other violations and view their administrative records.”

MIT Technology Review: How to turn filming the police into the end of police brutality

MIT Technology Review: How to turn filming the police into the end of police brutality. “Once again, footage taken on a smartphone is catalyzing action to end police brutality once and for all. But [Darnella] Frazier’s video also demonstrates the challenge of turning momentum into lasting change. Six years ago, the world watched as Eric Garner uttered the same words—’I can’t breathe’—while NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo strangled him in a chokehold. Four years ago, we watched again as Philando Castile, a 15-minute drive from Minneapolis, bled to death after being shot five times by Officer Jeronimo Yanez at a traffic stop. Both incidents also led to mass protests, and yet we’ve found ourselves here again. So how do we turn all this footage into something more permanent—not just protests and outrage, but concrete policing reform?”

Mercer Island Reporter: Mercer Island teen, who went viral for his COVID-19 dashboard, launches new website

Mercer Island Reporter: Mercer Island teen, who went viral for his COVID-19 dashboard, launches new website . “The site, which [Avi] Schiffmann announced June 2 on Twitter, aggregates and continually updates resources and information relevant to the recent wave of police-brutality protests happening nationally in response to the police killing of George Floyd and other black Americans.”

WTMJ: Retired Milwaukee police officer develops online memorial for victims of police injustice

WTMJ: Retired Milwaukee police officer develops online memorial for victims of police injustice. “For the past two weeks people across Milwaukee and the country have protested the issues of police overreach and racism on our streets, but what happens after the marching and protesting? Here in Milwaukee, a retired officer hopes to take the conversations to the web. The images of people who’ve died at the hands of police are now located in one spot on a website designed by retired Milwaukee police officer, Thomas Thadison.”

Vice: Police Violence at Protests Is Undeniable. All the Videos Are Right Here

Vice: Police Violence at Protests Is Undeniable. All the Videos Are Right Here. “Filming police brutality is always dangerous. But during these protests, the sheer volume of it that has been caught on camera and circulated online speaks to the fact that Americans are fed up and ready to press record, whatever the risk. Lawyer T. Greg Doucette and mathematician Jason Miller are working on compiling these clips and images of violence in a public Google Sheet, titled ‘GeorgeFloyd Protest – police brutality videos on Twitter.'”

Business Insider: Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Jeff Merkley propose creating a national database of cops with a record of misconduct

Business Insider: Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Jeff Merkley propose creating a national database of cops with a record of misconduct. “The National Police Misconduct Database and Transparency in Hiring Act, introduced by Merkley with support from Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, calls for creating a publicly searchable repository of law enforcement officers who engaged in misconduct. That includes the inappropriate use of force or discrimination.”

ABC 15: Database shows every Arizona law enforcement official tracked for ‘integrity’ concerns

ABC 15: Database shows every Arizona law enforcement official tracked for ‘integrity’ concerns. “For the first time ever, ABC15 has published a searchable database of all Arizona law enforcement officials tracked by prosecutors for credibility concerns, including past crimes, lying on the job, and other integrity issues. The unprecedented database of the state’s ‘Brady lists’ contains more than 1,400 law enforcement officials.”

Officer: Vermont City Plagued by Social Media Scandal Appoints 3 Police Chiefs in a Week

Officer: Vermont City Plagued by Social Media Scandal Appoints 3 Police Chiefs in a Week . I don’t usually post random municipal stuff like this but this is wild. “The state’s largest city, whose police department keeps getting mired in social media scandals, is appointing its third chief in a week as two have been forced to resign when underground Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts surfaced.”

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police . “Those on Hong Kong social media—especially on Twitter and some channels on Telegram, the secure messaging app preferred by the protesters—have made a concerted effort to document and publicize police brutality. #HongKongPoliceBrutality and #HongKongPoliceTerrorism are just two of the hashtags Hong Kongers use on Twitter as they recirculate videos and graphics contextualizing the violence. These netizen-protesters see themselves as being on the front lines of the information war over Hong Kong, coordinating a PR campaign to raise awareness—and get the international attention that they see as crucial to their movement’s success.” This was a great story, but The Nation had an pop-in ad for its mailing list that was really intrusive. I could only get rid of it by reloading the page.

Sacramento Bee: Search this database of police officers convicted of crimes in the past 10 years

Sacramento Bee: Search this database of police officers convicted of crimes in the past 10 years. “The review found 630 officers convicted of a crime in the last decade — an average of more than one a week. After DUI and other serious driving offenses, domestic violence was the most common charge. More than a quarter of the cases appear never to have been reported in the media until now. And nearly one out of five officers in the review are still working or kept their jobs for more than a year after sentencing.” This database is about California law enforcement, not other states or federal.