Washington Post: The midterms are here. Critics say Facebook is already behind.

Washington Post: The midterms are here. Critics say Facebook is already behind.. “Republican congressional candidate Joe Kent recently claimed ‘rampant voter fraud’ in the 2020 election in an ad on Facebook — a misinformation problem Facebook has tried to correct. The ad, which ran in mid-May as part of the Donald Trump-endorsed candidate’s race to win Washington state’s 3rd District, was one of several by the campaign to go undetected by Facebook’s system designed to remove false claims that the election results are invalid, according to a Washington Post analysis of Facebook’s ad library.”

The Guardian: Google excludes several independent candidates from Australian political ad tracker

The Guardian: Google excludes several independent candidates from Australian political ad tracker. “Google has admitted it overlooked several independent candidates and failed to include their elections ads in its public data on paid political material, raising doubts about the tech giant’s ability to track advertising during the looming federal campaign.”

News@Northeastern: Donald Trump Was The Exception When It Comes To Benefiting From Facebook Ads

News@Northeastern: Donald Trump Was The Exception When It Comes To Benefiting From Facebook Ads. “It’s one of the first studies to show that Facebook ads can have an impact on voter turnout. Most of the research on Facebook ads hasn’t found statistically significant effects. This study did. When the right message is applied to the receptive audience, in areas with ‘high-salience’ elections—where there is greater interest and excitement in the election—then the ads work.”

Poynter: How to find out who is behind a political ad on Facebook

Poynter: How to find out who is behind a political ad on Facebook. “The name of the Facebook page or account that placed the ad is always clear, but it might not tell you much. Phrases like ‘protect democracy,’ or ‘backing America’ fit equally well for both conservative and liberal organizations. There are, however, three steps you can take to learn more about who is trying to get your attention, and why.”

Facebook misidentified thousands of political ads: study (Tech Xplore)

Tech Xplore: Facebook misidentified thousands of political ads: study. “Facebook misidentified tens of thousands of advertisements flagged under its political ads policy, according to a study released Thursday, which warned that the failure could lead to political manipulation. Researchers at Belgium’s KU Leuven university and New York University examined 33.8 million Facebook ads that ran on the social media site between July 2020 and February 2021.”

AFP: Google to halt election ads ahead of 2022 Philippines vote

AFP: Google to halt election ads ahead of 2022 Philippines vote. “Google will stop carrying election ads in the Philippines ahead of the May 2022 presidential vote, the internet giant said Wednesday, similar to action it has taken in the United States. Alarm has been raised in recent years by governments and election watchdogs over the use of targeted political advertising, especially disinformation campaigns to sway voters.”

American Independent: Experts say Facebook’s new ad policy won’t do much but hurt small political campaigns

American Independent: Experts say Facebook’s new ad policy won’t do much but hurt small political campaigns. “Facebook announced a major change to its advertising interface on Nov. 9, barring firms from targeting users based on their race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or political affiliation. Experts say the change appears to be somewhat cosmetic, in response to the company’s recently battered public image, and that big firms will be able to circumvent the prohibition easily. But the shift could have a more profound effect on campaigns without a data team at their disposal who might not otherwise navigate the new parameters as effectively.”

USA Today: Anti-Trump Lincoln Project targets Texas governor with ad showing wall of COVID-19 coffins

USA Today: Anti-Trump Lincoln Project targets Texas governor with ad showing wall of COVID-19 coffins. “A Republican group known for speaking out against former President Donald Trump is calling out Texas Gov. Greg Abbott after a television ad was pulled blasting his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The Lincoln Project, an American political action committee formed in 2019 made up of former and current Republicans, issued a statement questioning why the TV ad that it funded for $25,000 on ESPN during the nationally televised Texas vs. Rice college football game didn’t air. The group said the ad was pulled 10 minutes before it was expected to run, despite ESPN’s legal team clearing it beforehand. ”

Los Angeles Times: On Google and YouTube, Newsom and Elder aim for two different Californias

Los Angeles Times: On Google and YouTube, Newsom and Elder aim for two different Californias. “Nearly two-thirds of the ads aired by groups backing Newsom and Elder only appeared for users in specific ZIP Codes. The ‘Stop the Republican Recall of Governor Newsom’ group aired ads on the coast in the state’s densely populated Democratic strongholds, while Elder’s campaign committee has opted for inland areas where Republicans are more common. A Times analysis of records from Jan. 1 to Aug. 31, released by the Google Transparency Project, shows the rival camps are using the platform’s vast collection of user data to target areas they see as key to victory.”

The Canadian Press: Conservatives delete ‘Willy Wonka’ ad from Twitter after copyright complaint

The Canadian Press: Conservatives delete ‘Willy Wonka’ ad from Twitter after copyright complaint. “The Conservative party has deleted an ad mocking Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau from Twitter after a copyright infringement claim was made against it. The ad, which was released on Friday, depicted Trudeau’s face pasted on top of an image of a bratty character from classic children’s film ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.’”

Engadget: Facebook disables accounts of NYU team looking into political ad targeting

Engadget: Facebook disables accounts of NYU team looking into political ad targeting. “Before the US election last year, a team of researchers from New York University’s engineering school launched a project to gather more data on political ads. In particular, the team wanted to know how political advertisers choose the demographic their ads target and don’t target. Shortly after the project called the NYU Ad Observatory went live, however, Facebook notified the researchers that their efforts violate its terms of service related to bulk data collection. Now, the social network has announced that it has ‘disabled the accounts, apps, Pages and platform access associated with NYU’s Ad Observatory Project and its operators…’”

San Diego Union-Tribune: Calif. task force recommends public archive for digital campaign ads

San Diego Union-Tribune: Calif. task force recommends public archive for digital campaign ads. “A task force convened by the state agency in charge of enforcing the California Political Reform Act is recommending the creation of a digital archive to track online advertisements promoting candidates for state office. In a report released this week by the Fair Political Practices Commission, task force members say a public database of digital ads would help voters, researchers, journalists and others keep better track of campaign spending by state office seekers.”

University of Arkansas: Study Explains Lax Oversight in Facebook Ads During 2016 Election

University of Arkansas: Study Explains Lax Oversight in Facebook Ads During 2016 Election. “U of A English professor Adam Pope and his colleague at San Jose State University examined lax oversight of advertising on Facebook during the 2016 political campaign and found a systematic bias toward ad buyers, specifically a Russian internet troll farm that sought to sow discord within the U.S. political system.”