Mother Jones: The Facebook Loophole That Makes Political Ads Look Like Regular Content

Mother Jones: The Facebook Loophole That Makes Political Ads Look Like Regular Content. “…last year, in an attempt to head off scrutiny form Washington, Facebook announced two new policies. First, ads for candidates and political issues would now carry a disclaimer at the top, stating who paid for the ad. Second, clicking on that disclaimer would direct viewers to a new ‘ad library,’ where they could see who else had viewed the ad by state, age, and gender. But Facebook left a gaping loophole in this system: If a user shares a political ad, the disclaimer disappears for anyone who sees the shared ad, as does the ability to click through it to the ad library. “

Google Blog: EU Political Advertising Transparency Report 2019

Google Blog: EU Political Advertising Transparency Report 2019. “To help people better understand the election ads they see online and support the integrity of elections, earlier this year we implemented a new process to verify advertisers for the EU Parliamentary election. We also require that these verified election ads incorporate a clear ‘paid for by’ disclosure. Today, we are expanding our portfolio of transparency reports to include an EU Political Advertising on Google Transparency Report to show voters who is purchasing election ads on Google in the EU and how much money is being spent.”

Mashable: Facebook bans political ads from other countries to fight EU election interference

Mashable: Facebook bans political ads from other countries to fight EU election interference . “Facebook announced a major change to combat foreign election interference ahead of the European Union (EU) elections in May. At a press briefing on Friday, Facebook officials said that in order to protect ‘the integrity of elections,’ they would be cracking down on online advertising from being used for foreign interference. All political advertisers in the EU now need to gain authorisation in the country where ads are being delivered.”

Crikey: How to use Facebook to influence Australian voters for just $20 a day

Crikey: How to use Facebook to influence Australian voters for just $20 a day. “I write this out of frustration with Facebook’s public position to elections in Australia. Facebook will now use their international foreign influence tools, but despite our Prime Minister calling the election, we still don’t have to be certified in order to run ads about issues of national importance. My hope is to demonstrate how gobsmackingly easy it is in Australia to run hyper targeted ads, using Facebook’s publicly available tools, to push a political stance to influence a neighbourhood, a postcode, a key electorate.”

Quartz: Facebook political ads show Modi is still king of social media in India

Quartz: Facebook political ads show Modi is still king of social media in India. “If India’s 2019 parliamentary polls were to be judged entirely by the political advertisements on Facebook, it is all about economics. These ads have predominantly focused on the economy and development. It’s even more clear who is grabbing the limelight: Prime minister Narendra Modi’s name features in far more of these ads than those of his rivals and allies.”

TechCrunch: Facebook launches searchable transparency library of all active ads

TechCrunch: Facebook launches searchable transparency library of all active ads. “Now you can search Facebook for how much Trump has spent on ads in the past year, which Pages’ ads reference immigration or what a Page’s previous names were. It’s all part of Facebook’s new Ad Library launching today that makes good on its promise to increase transparency after the social network’s ads were used to try to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential elections.”

Times of India: FB takes down several political ads by state outfits

Times of India: FB takes down several political ads by state outfits . “Political outfits from the state were quite closefisted when it came to splurging on Facebook advertisements, reveal data from Ad Library, a searchable database of ads related to politics and issues of national importance run on Facebook or Instagram. Several such ads were taken down by the Facebook as the parties failed to provide information on who was paying for it.”