New York Times: How Misinformation ‘Superspreaders’ Seed False Election Theories

New York Times: How Misinformation ‘Superspreaders’ Seed False Election Theories. “New research from Avaaz, a global human rights group, the Elections Integrity Partnership and The New York Times shows how a small group of people — mostly right-wing personalities with outsized influence on social media — helped spread the false voter-fraud narrative that led to those [“Stop the Steal”] rallies.”

New York Times: Facebook, Alarmed by Discord Over Vote Count, Is Said to Be Taking Action

New York Times: Facebook, Alarmed by Discord Over Vote Count, Is Said to Be Taking Action. “Facebook is planning to enact new measures to make it more difficult for election misinformation to spread virally across its platform, two people with knowledge of the matter said Thursday, as the outcome of the presidential race remained uncertain.”

USA Today: Twitter adding messages to preemptively debunk misinformation ahead of election

USA Today: Twitter adding messages to preemptively debunk misinformation ahead of election. “Twitter will roll out messages on its platform preemptively debunking false information about the 2020 election as social media companies brace for a deluge of misinformation. On Monday, Twitter said it will introduce prompts to U.S. users ‘that preemptively address topics that are likely to be the subject of election misinformation.'”

NBC News: Coordinated push of conspiracy theories target Biden hours before debate

NBC News: Coordinated push of conspiracy theories target Biden hours before debate. “On Facebook, memes insisting Biden should have his ears inspected for electronic devices before the debate saturated the platform on Tuesday. One meme that simply said ‘Joe Biden should be inspected for a hidden ear piece as well as submit to a drug test before the debate. Share if you agree!’ was posted by a network of conservative sites early Tuesday morning.”

Vox Recode: How to guard your social feeds against election misinformation

Vox Recode: How to guard your social feeds against election misinformation. “Election Day is approaching, and you’ll likely have to use your own judgment to identify misleading or downright false content on social media. So how can you prepare? Plenty of outlets have written guides to spotting misinformation on your feeds — some great resources are available at The Verge, Factcheck.org, and the Toronto Public Library. You can go beyond that by minimizing the chance that you’ll come across misinformation in the first place (though there’s no guarantee).”

Download the Election Deception Tracker: A New Tool to Fight Online Misinformation (MapLight)

MapLight: Download the Election Deception Tracker: A New Tool to Fight Online Misinformation . “With only a few clicks, the Election Deception Tracker allows users to capture content from their Facebook feeds that contains false or misleading content about the election, voting-by-mail, and other voter suppression or intimidation and send it to a team of election protection advocates who will analyze the information and push for its removal.” Looks like this is a browser extension available for Chrome and Firefox.

Washington Post: Pro-Trump youth group enlists teens in secretive campaign likened to a ‘troll farm,’ prompting rebuke by Facebook and Twitter

Washington Post: Pro-Trump youth group enlists teens in secretive campaign likened to a ‘troll farm,’ prompting rebuke by Facebook and Twitter. “The messages have been emanating in recent months from the accounts of young people in Arizona seemingly expressing their own views — standing up for President Trump in a battleground state and echoing talking points from his reelection campaign. Far from representing a genuine social media groundswell, however, the posts are the product of a sprawling yet secretive campaign that experts say evades the guardrails put in place by social media companies to limit online disinformation of the sort used by Russia during the 2016 campaign.”

USA Today: We’re launching an election-season ad campaign to fight fake news, and we need your help

USA Today: We’re launching an election-season ad campaign to fight fake news, and we need your help . “…our organizations, the News Literacy Project and The Open Mind Legacy Project, are distributing public service announcements around the country this week to combat malicious fabrication, bots and online trolls that seek to mislead voters and suppress voting. These engaging and animated PSAs will seek to inoculate voters against viral deception about how and when they can vote and encourage them to be skeptical about the election information they encounter.”